A History of Antarctic Science

Author: Gordon Elliott Fogg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521361133
Release Date: 1992-09-24
Genre: Nature

This book describes the development of Antarctic science over three centuries against a background of advances in techniques of travelling and working in the polar environment and changing political attitudes to a remote and unknown part of the world.

An Empire of Ice

Author: Larson, Edward John Larson
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300159769
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Published to coincide with the centenary of the first expeditions to reach the South Pole, "An Empire of Ice" presents a fascinating new take on Antarctic exploration. Retold with added information, it's the first book to place the famed voyages of Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen, his British rivals Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton, and others in a larger scientific, social, and geopolitical context. Efficient, well prepared, and focused solely on the goal of getting to his destination and back, Amundsen has earned his place in history as the first to reach the South Pole. Scott, meanwhile, has been reduced in the public mind to a dashing incompetent who stands for little more than relentless perseverance in the face of inevitable defeat. "An Empire of Ice" offers a new perspective on the Antarctic expeditions of the early twentieth century by looking at the British efforts for what they actually were: massive scientific enterprises in which reaching the South Pole was but a spectacular sideshow. By focusing on the larger purpose, Edward Larson deepens our appreciation of the explorers' achievements, shares little-known stories, and shows what the Heroic Age of Antarctic discovery was really about.

The Belgica Expedition Centennial

Author: Claude de Broyer
Publisher: Vub Press
ISBN: 9054873132
Release Date: 2001
Genre: History

The Belgica expedition to Antarctica returned with an important scientific harvest and a complete annual cycle of observations. A century later, this book tries to enlighten some aspects of this expedition and commemorates its participants by looking back to their achievements and the great influence they had on subsequent Antarctic research and exploration.

Antarctica

Author: Gabrielle Walker
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780151015207
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Nature

A profile of Antarctica and its indigenous life traces the history of regional exploration and the science currently being conducted there while explaining how Antarctica reveals key insights into the planet's environmental future.

Dispatches from Continent Seven

Author: Rebecca Priestley
Publisher:
ISBN: 1927249058
Release Date: 2016-03-04
Genre: Science

A new edition of the ultimate and most essential guide to Doctor Who, now updated to include all twelve incarnations of the Doctor and covering all his newest adventures from Series 8 and 9. With fascinating facts from all of space and time, as well as information on the Doctor's helpful companions and fearsome foes, this book will tell all about the Doctor's Tardis, his regenerations, and much, much mor

The European Antarctic

Author: P. Roberts
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230337909
Release Date: 2011-12-19
Genre: History

This is the first transnational study of British, Norwegian, and Swedish engagement with the Antarctic. Rather than charting how Europeans unveiled the Antarctic, it uses the history of Antarctic activity as a window into the political and cultural worlds of twentieth-century Britain and Scandinavia.

Antarctica

Author: David Day
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199861453
Release Date: 2013
Genre: History

Explains the history of Antarctica, focusing on the explorers and sailors drawn to the continent, the scientific investigations that have taken place there, and the geopolitical implications of the landmass.

Antarctica and the Humanities

Author: Roberts Peder
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137545756
Release Date: 2016-08-31
Genre: History

The continent for science is also a continent for the humanities. Despite having no indigenous human population, Antarctica has been imagined in powerful, innovative, and sometimes disturbing ways that reflect politics and culture much further north. Antarctica has become an important source of data for natural scientists working to understand global climate change. As this book shows, the tools of literary studies, history, archaeology, and more, can likewise produce important insights into the nature of the modern world and humanity more broadly.

Antarctica

Author: D. W. H. Walton
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107003927
Release Date: 2013-03-28
Genre: Science

A dramatically illustrated book, by leading international scientists, which describes Antarctica's central role in global scientific research.

A History of Antarctica

Author: Stephen Martin
Publisher: Rosenberg Publishing
ISBN: 9781922013729
Release Date: 2013-02-01
Genre: Antarctica

This is a comprehensive history of Antarctica from the earliest human contact through to the present. It covers the early explorers (Polynesians), the flora and the fauna, geological features, and the amazing marine diversity. The author discusses the physical and emotional effect of Antarctica on explorers, scientists, workers and visitors.

The Technocratic Antarctic

Author: Jessica O'Reilly
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9781501708350
Release Date: 2017-01-17
Genre: Science

The Technocratic Antarctic is an ethnographic account of the scientists and policymakers who work on Antarctica. In a place with no indigenous people, Antarctic scientists and policymakers use expertise as their primary model of governance. Scientific research and policymaking are practices that inform each other, and the Antarctic environment—with its striking beauty, dramatic human and animal lives, and specter of global climate change—not only informs science and policy but also lends Antarctic environmentalism a particularly technocratic patina. Jessica O'Reilly conducted most of her research for this book in New Zealand, home of the "Antarctic Gateway" city of Christchurch, and on an expedition to Windless Bight, Antarctica, with the New Zealand Antarctic Program. O’Reilly also follows the journeys Antarctic scientists and policymakers take to temporarily “Antarctic” places such as science conferences, policy workshops, and the international Antarctic Treaty meetings in Scotland, Australia, and India. Competing claims of nationalism, scientific disciplines, field experiences, and personal relationships among Antarctic environmental managers disrupt the idea of a utopian epistemic community. O’Reilly focuses on what emerges in Antarctica among the complicated and hybrid forms of science, sociality, politics, and national membership found there. The Technocratic Antarctic unfolds the historical, political, and moral contexts that shape experiences of and decisions about the Antarctic environment.

Antarctic Climate Evolution

Author: Fabio Florindo
Publisher: Elsevier
ISBN: 0080931618
Release Date: 2008-10-10
Genre: Science

Antarctic Climate Evolution is the first book dedicated to furthering knowledge on the evolution of the world’s largest ice sheet over its ~34 million year history. This volume provides the latest information on subjects ranging from terrestrial and marine geology to sedimentology and glacier geophysics. An overview of Antarctic climate change, analyzing historical, present-day and future developments Contributions from leading experts and scholars from around the world Informs and updates climate change scientists and experts in related areas of study

Deep Freeze

Author: Dian Olson Belanger
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 9781457109577
Release Date: 2011-05-18
Genre: History

In Deep Freeze, Dian Olson Belanger tells the story of the pioneers who built viable communities, made vital scientific discoveries, and established Antarctica as a continent dedicated to peace and the pursuit of science, decades after the first explorers planted flags in the ice. In the tense 1950s, even as the world was locked in the Cold War, U.S. scientists, maintained by the Navy's Operation Deep Freeze, came together in Antarctica with counterparts from eleven other countries to participate in the International Geophysical Year (IGY). On July 1, 1957, they began systematic, simultaneous scientific observations of the south-polar ice and atmosphere. Their collaborative success over eighteen months inspired the Antarctic Treaty of 1959, which formalized their peaceful pursuit of scientific knowledge. Still building on the achievements of the individuals and distrustful nations thrown together by the IGY from mutually wary military, scientific, and political cultures, science prospers today and peace endures. The year 2007 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the IGY and the commencement of a new International Polar Year - a compelling moment to review what a singular enterprise accomplished in a troubled time. Belanger draws from interviews, diaries, memoirs, and official records to weave together the first thorough study of the dawn of Antarctica's scientific age. Deep Freeze offers absorbing reading for those who have ventured onto Antarctic ice and those who dream of it, as well as historians, scientists, and policy makers

Antarctic science the way forward

Author: Antarctic Science Advisory Committee (Australia)
Publisher:
ISBN: 0642180644
Release Date: 1992
Genre: History

Committee report in response to 1989 brief to: examine extent to which Antarctic science should be conducted within universities or research institutes as distinct from Antarctic Division (but within ASAC's priority research area framework); assess ways to increase scientific productivity; and examine adequacy of existing incentives to publish research results. Map in pocket produced in 1992 by Antarctic Division: "Antarctica and the Southern Ocean relating the region to Australia, New -- 1959 Antarctic Treaty.