A History of Ecology and Environmentalism in Spanish American Literature

Author: Scott M. DeVries
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781611485165
Release Date: 2013-09-05
Genre: Literary Criticism

This book traces the development of ecology and environmentalism in Spanish American literature. It provides a historical and literary context for the recent and expanding interest in reading, analyzing and especially teaching Latin America’s environmental literature.

The Image of the River in Latin o American Literature

Author: Jeanie Murphy
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9781498547307
Release Date: 2017-12-20
Genre: Literary Criticism

Through the lens of ecocriticism, history, memory, and gender studies, this book studies the many ways in which the image of the river has been integrated into Latin/o American literature from the period of exploration and colonization to modern times, examining the imagery and symbolism tied to rivers in the writings of the region.

Ecological Crisis and Cultural Representation in Latin America

Author: Mark Anderson
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9781498530965
Release Date: 2016-10-04
Genre: Social Science

This book approaches portrayals of environmental crises in Latin American nations in literature, film, performance, and digital art within the context of the ongoing expansion of globalized neoliberal capitalism from and ecocritical perspective.

Creature Discomfort

Author: Scott M. DeVries
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004316591
Release Date: 2016-05-09
Genre: Nature

Creature Discomfort innovates the notion of “fauna-criticism” to reframe the literary history of and expound animal ethical positions from Spanish American nineteenth century, modernista, Regional, indigenista, and contemporary fiction and poetry.

Handbook of Ecocriticism and Cultural Ecology

Author: Hubert Zapf
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 9783110394894
Release Date: 2016-05-10
Genre: Literary Criticism

Ecocriticism has emerged as one of the most fascinating and rapidly growing fields of recent literary and cultural studies. The volume maps some of the most important developments within contemporary Ecocriticism from a variety of different angles, approaches, areas, and perspectives. It introduces relevant theoretical concepts and demonstrates their relevance for the analysis of texts and other cultural phenomena.

Spatializing the History of Ecology

Author: Raf De Bont
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781351750929
Release Date: 2017-06-26
Genre:

Throughout its history, the discipline of ecology has always been profoundly entangled with the history of space and place. On the one hand, ecology is a field science that has thrived on the study of concrete spatial entities, such as islands, forests or rivers. These spaces are the workplaces in which ecological phenomena are identified, observed and experimented on. They provide both epistemic opportunities and constraints that structure the agenda and the analytical sensibilities of ecological researchers. On the other hand, ecological knowledge and practices have become important resources through which spaces and places are classified, delineated, explained, experienced and managed. The impact of these activities reaches far beyond the realms of the ecological discipline. Many ecological concepts such as "biotopes," "ecosystems" and "the biosphere" have become entities that widely resonate in public life and policy making. This book explores the mutual entanglement between space and knowledge-making in the history of ecology. Its first goal is to explore to which extent a spatial perspective can shed new light on the history of ecological science. Second, it uses ecology as a critical site to gain broader insights into the history of the environment in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Via a series of case studies - discussing topics that range from ecological field stations in the early-twentieth century Caribbean over wisent breeding in Nazi Germany to computer modelling in North American deserts - the book offers a tour through the changing landscapes of modern ecology.

The Natural World in Latin American Literatures

Author: Adrian Taylor Kane
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786457601
Release Date: 2010-04-15
Genre: Literary Criticism

From the Popol Vuh to postmodernism, imagery of the natural world has played an important role in Latin American literature. In contrast to the rise of ecocritical scholarship in Anglophone literary studies, Latin American literary ecocriticism has been slower to take root. This volume of eleven essays seeks to advance the ecocritical conversation among Latin Americanists, furthering insight into the relationship between humans and their environments. The essays address regions as diverse as Patagonia and the Chihuahua Desert.

A Plague of Sheep

Author: Elinor G. K. Melville
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052157448X
Release Date: 1997-07-13
Genre: History

This is a book about the biological conquest of the New World. Taking as a case study the sixteenth century history of a region of highland central Mexico, it shows how the environmental and social changes brought about by the introduction of Old World species aided European expansion. The book spells out in detail the environmental changes associated with the introduction of Old World grazing animals into New World ecosystems, demonstrates how these changes enabled the Spanish takeover of land, and explains how environmental changes shaped the colonial societies.

Ecological Imperialism

Author: Alfred W. Crosby
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107569874
Release Date: 2015-10-31
Genre: History

A fascinating study of the important role of biology in European expansion, from 900 to 1900.

Silent Spring

Author: Rachel Carson
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0618249060
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Nature

Discusses the reckless annihilation of fish and birds by the use of pesticides and warns of the possible genetic effects on humans.

Ecological Imaginations in Latin American Fiction

Author: Laura Barbas-Rhoden
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813044154
Release Date: 2012-12-01
Genre: Literary Criticism

From the rainforests of Costa Rica and the Amazon to the windswept lands of Tierra del Fuego, Laura Barbas-Rhoden discusses the natural settings within contemporary Latin American novels as they depict key moments of environmental change or crisis in the region from the nineteenth-century imperialism to the present. By integrating the use of futuristic novels, Barbas-Rhoden pushes the ecocriticism discussion beyond the realm of "nature writing." She avoids the clichés of literary nature and reminds readers that today's urban centers are also part of Latin America and its environmental crisis. One of the first writers to apply ecocriticism to Latin American fiction, Barbas-Rhoden argues that literature can offer readers a deeper understanding of the natural world and humanity's place in it. She demonstrates that ecocritical readings of Latin American topics must take into account social, racial, and gender injustices. She also addresses postapocalyptic science fiction that speaks to a fear of environmental collapse and reminds North American readers that the environments of Latin America are rich and diverse, encompassing both rural and urban extremes.

Ecology of Fear

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781466862845
Release Date: 2014-01-14
Genre: Science

Los Angeles has become a magnet for the American apocalyptic imagination. Riot, fire, flood, earthquake...only locusts are missing from the almost biblical list of disasters that have struck the city in the 1990s. From Ventura to Laguna, more than one million Southern Californians have been directly touched by disaster-related death, injury, or damage to their homes and businesses. Middle-class apprehensions about angry underclasses are exceeded only by anxieties about blind thrust faults underlying downtown L.A. or about the firestorms that periodically incinerate Malibu. And the force of real catastrophe has been redoubled by the obsessive fictional destruction of Los Angeles--by aliens, comets, and twisters--in scores of novels and films. The former "Land of Sunshine" is now seen by much of the world, including many of L.A.'s increasingly nervous residents, as a veritable Book of the Apocalypse theme park. In this extraordinary book, Mike Davis, the author of City of Quartz and our most fascinating interpreter of the American metropolis, unravels the secret political history of disaster, real and imaginary, in Southern California. As he surveys the earthquakes of Santa Monica, the burning of Koreatown, the invasion of "man-eating" mountain lions, the movie Volcano, and even Los Angeles's underrated tornado problem, he exposes the deep complicity between social injustice and perceptions of natural disorder. Arguing that paranoia about nature obscures the fact that Los Angeles has deliberately put itself in harm's way, Davis reveals how market-driven urbanization has for generations transgressed against environmental common sense. And he shows that the floods, fires, and earthquakes reaped by the city were tragedies as avoidable--and unnatural--as the beating of Rodney King and the ensuing explosion in the streets. Rich with detail, bold and original, Ecology of Fear is a gripping reconnaissance into the urban future, an essential portrait of America at the millennium.

California Indians and Their Environment

Author: Kent G. Lightfoot
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520244719
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Nature

"Relevant, timely, and approachable, California Indians and Their Environment is an instant classic that should be invaluable for anyone interested in California's diverse natural and cultural landscapes and the future sustainability of the state."--Torben Rick, author of Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective "California Indians and Their Environment stands respectfully on the shoulders of scholarly giants and demonstrates the cumulative power of cultural, historical, and scientific research. It is a remarkably inclusive and relevant text that is both highly informative of past indigenous life ways and identities and strikingly insightful into current environmental crises that confront us all."--Seth Mallios, author of The Deadly Politics of Giving: Exchange and Violence at Ajacan, Roanoke, and Jamestown "In this highly readable and insightful book, Lightfoot and Parrish show how the natural diversity of California not only influenced the contours of Indian lifeways, but was indeed augmented by burning and other practices, that were used to sustain indigenous economies. The ingenuity and skill with which California Indians managed and used natural resources underscores the need to infuse modern land-use policy with the knowledge of people whose ecological experiences in North America eclipse those of Euroamericans by a factor of forty."--Kenneth E. Sassaman, author of People of the Shoals: Stallings Culture of the Savannah River Valley "This book is a deeply informative and fascinating examination of California Indians' rich and complex relationship with the ecological landscape. Lightfoot and Parrish have thoroughly updated the classic book, The Natural World of the California Indians, with critical analysis of anthropological theory and methods and incorporation of indigenous knowledge and practices. It is a lucid, accessible book that tells an intriguing story for our modern times."--Melissa K. Nelson, San Francisco State University and President of The Cultural Conservancy "At once scholarly and accessible, this book is destined to be a classic. Framed around pressing environmental issues of concern to a broad range of Californians today, Lightfoot and Parrish provide an historical ecology of California's amazingly diverse environments, its biological resources, and the Native peoples who both adapted to and actively managed them."--Jon M. Erlandson, author of Early Hunter-Gatherers of the California Coast "California Indians and Their Environment fills a significant gap in our understanding of the first peoples of California. Lightfoot and Parrish take on the daunting task of synthesizing and expanding on our knowledge of indigenous land-management practices, sustainable economies, and the use of natural resources for food, medicine, and technological needs. This innovative and thought-provoking book is highly recommended to anyone who wants to learn more about the diverse traditions of California Indians."--Lynn Gamble, author of The Chumash World at European Contact "This innovative book moves understanding of the Native Peoples of California from the past to the future. The authors' insight into Native Californians as fire managers is an eye-opener to interpreting the ecological and cultural uniqueness of the region. Lightfoot and Parrish have provided the best introduction to Native California while at the same time advancing the best scholarship with an original synthesis. A rare feat!"--William Simmons, Brown University

Church Cosmovision and the Environment

Author: Evan Berry
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351596114
Release Date: 2018-06-27
Genre: Religion

Though currently only partially understood, evolving interactions among Latin American communities of faith, governments, and civil societies are a key feature of the popular mobilizations and policy debates about environmental issues in the region. This edited collection describes and analyses multiple types of religious engagement with environmental concerns and conflicts seen in modern Latin American democracies. This volume contributes to scholarship on the intersections of religion with environmental conflict in a number of ways. Firstly, it provides comparative analysis of the manner in which diverse religious actors are currently participating in transnational, national, and local advocacy in places such as, Peru, Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Mexico. It also considers the diversity of an often plural religious engagement with advocacy, including Catholic, Evangelical and Pentecostal perspectives alongside the effects of indigenous cosmological ideas. Finally, this book explores the specific religious sources of seemingly unlikely new alliances and novel articulations of rights, social justice, and ethics for the environmental concerns of Latin America. The relationship between religion and environmental issues is an increasingly important topic in the conversations around ecology and climate change. This book is, therefore, a pertinent and topical work for any academic working in Religious Studies, Environmental Studies, and Latin American Studies.

Seeing Green

Author: Drew Jean Propson
Publisher:
ISBN: UCAL:C3510682
Release Date: 2007
Genre: