A Skeptic Among Scholars

Author: August Frugé
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520084268
Release Date: 1993-09-15
Genre: History

When August Frugé joined the University of California Press in 1944, it was part of the University's printing department, publishing a modest number of books a year, mainly monographs by UC faculty members. When he retired as director 32 years later, the Press had been transformed into one of the largest, most distinguished university presses in the country, publishing more than 150 books annually in fields ranging from ancient history to contemporary film criticism, by notable authors from all over the world. August Frugé's memoir provides an exciting intellectual and topical story of the building of this great press. Along the way, it recalls battles for independence from the University administration, the Press's distinctive early style of book design, and many of the authors and staff who helped shape the Press in its formative years.

Skepticism in Classical Islam

Author: Paul L. Heck
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134591176
Release Date: 2013-11-20
Genre: Religion

The first major treatment of skepticism in Islam, this book explores the critical role of skeptical thinking in the development of theology in Islam. It examines the way key thinkers in classical Islam faced perplexing questions about the nature of God and his relation to the world, all the while walking a fine line between belief in God’s message as revealed in the Qur’an, and the power of the mind to discover truths on its own. Skepticism in Classical Islam reveals how doubt was actually an integral part of scholarly life at this time. Skepticism is by no means synonymous with atheism. It is, rather, the admission that one cannot convincingly demonstrate a truth claim with certainty, and Islam’s scholars, like their counterparts elsewhere, acknowledged such impasses, only to be inspired to find new ways to resolve the conundrums they faced. Whilst their conundrums were unique, their admission of the limits of knowledge shares much with other scholarly traditions. Seeking to put Islam on the map of the broader study of the history of scepticism, this book will be of interest to scholars and students of Religion, History and Philosophy.

Three Pillars of Skepticism in Classical India

Author: Ethan Mills
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781498555708
Release Date: 2018-09-15
Genre: Philosophy

This book argues that the philosophical history of India contains a tradition of skepticism about philosophy represented most clearly by three figures: Nāgārjuna, Jayarāśi, and Śrī Harṣa. Furthermore, understanding this tradition ought to be an important part of our contemporary metaphilosophical reflections on the purposes and limits of philosophy.

Skepticism From Antiquity to the Present

Author: Diego Machuca
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781472511492
Release Date: 2018-01-25
Genre: Philosophy

Skepticism: From Antiquity to the Present is an authoritative and up-to-date survey of the entire history of skepticism. Divided chronologically into ancient, medieval, renaissance, modern, and contemporary periods, and featuring 50 specially-commissioned chapters from leading philosophers, this comprehensive volume is the first of its kind. By exploring each of the distinct traditions and providing expert insights, this extensive reference work: - covers major thinkers such as Sextus Empiricus, Cicero, Descartes, Hume, Spinoza, and Wittgenstein. - acknowledges the influence of ancient skeptical traditions on later philosophy and explains why it is still a fertile topic of inquiry among today's philosophers and historians of philosophy. - analyzes various forms of skepticism including Pyrrhonian, Academic, religious, moral, and neo-Pyrrhonian. - addresses issues in contemporary epistemology and indicates new directions of study. Skepticism, a driving force in the history of philosophy, remains at the center of debates in ethics, philosophy of religion, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind. Skepticism: From Antiquity to the Present is an essential point of reference for any student, researcher, or practitioner of philosophy, presenting a systematic and historical survey of this core philosophical topic.

Market State and Society in Contemporary Latin America

Author: William C. Smith
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444335255
Release Date: 2010-02-22
Genre: Political Science

"Market, State, and Society in Contemporary Latin America" explores fundamental issues in the political economy of the region in the early twenty-first century. The chapters in this volume deploy a variety of theoretical and methodological perspectives to understand the recent transformations in relations among market, state, and society in Latin American countries. Based on careful empirical research, the contributors go beyond popular state-centric explanations of economic policy-making in the region, emphasizing the centrality of state-society bargaining in the design and implementation of market-oriented restructuring. By the same token, the chapters in "Market, State and Society" also challenge simplistic argument about state decline, demonstrating the crucial role of differing configurations of domestic actors, interests and institutions in mediating the effects of globalization on welfare regimes, labor politics, and popular contestation.

The Specter of Skepticism in the Age of Enlightenment

Author: Anton M. Matytsin
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9781421420523
Release Date: 2016-11-06
Genre: History

The ancient Greek philosophy of Pyrrhonian skepticism spread across a wide spectrum of disciplines in the 1600s, casting a shadow over the European learned world. The early modern skeptics expressed doubt concerning the existence of an objective reality independent of human perception. They also questioned long-standing philosophical assumptions and, at times, undermined the foundations of political, moral, and religious authorities. How did eighteenth-century scholars overcome this skeptical crisis of confidence to usher in the so-called Age of Reason? In The Specter of Skepticism in the Age of Enlightenment, Anton Matytsin describes how skeptical rhetoric forced philosophers to formulate the principles and assumptions that they found to be certain or, at the very least, highly probable. In attempting to answer the deep challenge of philosophical skepticism, these thinkers explicitly articulated the rules for attaining true and certain knowledge and defined the boundaries beyond which human understanding could not venture. Matytsin explains the dialectical outcome of the philosophical disputes between the skeptics and their various opponents in France, the Dutch Republic, Switzerland, and Prussia. He shows that these exchanges transformed skepticism by mitigating its arguments while broadening the learned world’s confidence in the capacities of reason by moderating its aspirations. Ultimately, the debates about the powers and limits of human understanding led to the making of a new conception of rationality that privileged practicable reason over speculative reason. Matytsin also complicates common narratives about the Enlightenment by demonstrating that most of the thinkers who defended reason from skeptical critiques were religiously devout. By attempting either to preserve or to reconstruct the foundations of their worldviews and systems of thought, they became important agents of intellectual change and formulated new criteria of doubt and certainty. This complex and engaging book offers a powerful new explanation of how Enlightenment thinkers came to understand the purposes and the boundaries of rational inquiry.

Silencing Scientists and Scholars in Other Fields

Author: Gordon Moran
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 156750342X
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Education

An examination of power paradigm controls, peer review and scholarly communication. It covers issues such as: silencing scholars within totalitarian and democratic forms of government; intellectual freedom, intellectual suppression, the big lie and the freedom to lie; and rhetoric versus reality.

Shakespeare s Marlowe

Author: Professor Robert A Logan
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781409489740
Release Date: 2013-04-28
Genre: Literary Criticism

Moving beyond traditional studies of sources and influence, Shakespeare's Marlowe analyzes the uncommonly powerful aesthetic bond between Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare. Not only does this study take into account recent ideas about intertextuality, but it also shows how the process of tracking Marlowe's influence itself prompts questions and reflections that illuminate the dramatists' connections. Further, after questioning the commonly held view of Marlowe and Shakespeare as rivals, the individual chapters suggest new possible interrelationships in the formation of Shakespeare's works. Such examination of Shakespeare's Marlovian inheritance enhances our understanding of the dramaturgical strategies of each writer and illuminates the importance of such strategies as shaping forces on their works. Robert Logan here makes plain how Shakespeare incorporated into his own work the dramaturgical and literary devices that resulted in Marlowe's artistic and commercial success. Logan shows how Shakespeare's examination of the mechanics of his fellow dramatist's artistry led him to absorb and develop three especially powerful influences: Marlowe's remarkable verbal dexterity, his imaginative flexibility in reconfiguring standard notions of dramatic genres, and his astute use of ambivalence and ambiguity. This study therefore argues that Marlowe and Shakespeare regarded one another not chiefly as writers with great themes, but as practicing dramatists and poets-which is where, Logan contends, the influence begins and ends.

Prisoner Reentry in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Author: Daniel P. Mears
Publisher: SAGE Publications
ISBN: 9781483316703
Release Date: 2014-10-27
Genre: Social Science

Understanding and Improving Prisoner Reentry Outcomes Prisoner Reentry is an engaging and comprehensive examination of prisoner reentry and how to improve public safety, well-being, and justice in the “era of mass incarceration.” Renowned authors Daniel P. Mears and Joshua C. Cochran investigate historical trends in incarceration and punishment policy, the salience of in-prison and post-prison contexts and experiences for reentry, and the importance of understanding group differences in offending, punishment, and social context. Using extensive reliance on both theory and empirical research, the authors identify how reentry reflects criminal justice policy in America and, at the same time, has profound implications for crime prevention and justice. Readers will develop a diverse foundation for current policies, identify the implications of reentry for families, community, and society at large, and gain a conceptual and empirical toolkit for analyzing and improving the lives of those released from prison.

A New Introduction to Islam

Author: Daniel W. Brown
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781444357721
Release Date: 2011-08-24
Genre: Religion

The second edition of this student-friendly textbook explores the origins, major features and lasting influence of the Islamic tradition. Traces the development of Muslim beliefs and practices against the background of social and cultural contexts extending from North Africa to South and Southeast Asia Fully revised for the second edition, with completely new opening and closing chapters considering key issues facing Islam in the 21st century Focuses greater attention on everyday practices, the role of women in Muslim societies, and offers additional material on Islam in America Includes detailed chronologies, tables summarizing key information, useful maps and diagrams, and many more illustrations

New Essays on Ancient Pyrrhonism

Author: Diego E. Machuca
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004207769
Release Date: 2011-07-12
Genre: Philosophy

Scholarship on ancient Pyrrhonism has made tremendous advances over the past three decades, thanks especially to the careful reexamination of Sextus Empiricus’ extant corpus. Building on this momentum, the authors of the eight essays collected here examine some of the most vexed and intriguing exegetical and philosophical questions posed by Sextus’ presentation of this form of skepticism. The essays explore in a new light the skeptical interpretation of Plato, the differences between Pyrrhonism and Cyrenaicism, the Pyrrhonist’s stance on ordinary life, religion, language, and ethics, Sextus’ discussion of our access to our own mental states, and the relationship between Pyrrhonism and epistemic internalism and externalism. These new essays represent a substantial contribution to the advancement of scholarship on Pyrrhonian skepticism.

20 Compelling Evidences That God Exists

Author: Ken Boa
Publisher: David C Cook
ISBN: 9780781409414
Release Date: 2013-10-04
Genre: Religion

Is it Reasonable to Believe? Remarkably, even though millions upon millions of us do believe in God, when we are asked why we have such faith, we become tongue-tied and struggle to give a reason for our hope. No wonder those who don't believe God exists remain unconvinced—there's too few of us ready to speak on God's behalf! Ken Boa and Robert Bowman have provided a resource that tackles the most profound arguments from philosophy, science, sociology, psychology, and history ... and presents twenty clear, concise, and compelling evidences that show that faith in God—and specifically Jesus Christ—is reasonable.

The Arctic Home in the Vedas

Author: Bal Gangadhar Tilak
Publisher: Arktos
ISBN: 9781907166341
Release Date: 2011-05
Genre: Religion

Drawing upon his vast knowledge of the Hindu Vedas and the Zoroastrian Avesta, Tilak makes a painstakingly detailed analysis of the texts and compares them with the geological, astronomical, and archaeological evidence to show the plausibility of the Arctic having been the primordial cradle of the Aryan race before changing conditions forced the Aryans southward into present-day Europe, Iran, and India.