A Universal Theory of Pottery Production

Author: Richard A. Krause
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817318987
Release Date: 2016-05-30
Genre: History

An interactional theory of artifact description -- A theory of ceramic production : the focal form -- A theory of production steps and stages -- The classification of artifact complexes -- Background for the study of the ceramic sample from Paso del Indio -- The Paso del Indio sample size, morphology, and manufacture -- Modes of appendation -- Decoration, drying, and firing -- Summary and discussion

American Empire and the Politics of Meaning

Author: Julian Go
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822389323
Release Date: 2008-02-22
Genre: Social Science

When the United States took control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico in the wake of the Spanish-American War, it declared that it would transform its new colonies through lessons in self-government and the ways of American-style democracy. In both territories, U.S. colonial officials built extensive public school systems, and they set up American-style elections and governmental institutions. The officials aimed their lessons in democratic government at the political elite: the relatively small class of the wealthy, educated, and politically powerful within each colony. While they retained ultimate control for themselves, the Americans let the elite vote, hold local office, and formulate legislation in national assemblies. American Empire and the Politics of Meaning is an examination of how these efforts to provide the elite of Puerto Rico and the Philippines a practical education in self-government played out on the ground in the early years of American colonial rule, from 1898 until 1912. It is the first systematic comparative analysis of these early exercises in American imperial power. The sociologist Julian Go unravels how American authorities used “culture” as both a tool and a target of rule, and how the Puerto Rican and Philippine elite received, creatively engaged, and sometimes silently subverted the Americans’ ostensibly benign intentions. Rather than finding that the attempt to transplant American-style democracy led to incommensurable “culture clashes,” Go assesses complex processes of cultural accommodation and transformation. By combining rich historical detail with broader theories of meaning, culture, and colonialism, he provides an innovative study of the hidden intersections of political power and cultural meaning-making in America’s earliest overseas empire.

Method and Theory in American Archaeology

Author: Gordon Willey
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817310882
Release Date: 2001-02-14
Genre: History

A Dan Josselyn Memorial Publication This invaluable classic provides the framework for the development of American archaeology during the last half of the 20th century. In 1958 Gordon R. Willey and Philip Phillips first published Method and Theory in American Archaeology— a volume that went through five printings, the last in 1967 at the height of what became known as the new, or processual, archaeology. The advent of processual archaeology, according to Willey and Phillips, represented a "theoretical debate . . . a question of whether archaeology should be the study of cultural history or the study of cultural process." Willey and Phillips suggested that little interpretation had taken place in American archaeology, and their book offered an analytical perspective; the methods they described and the structural framework they used for synthesizing American prehistory were all geared toward interpretation. Method and Theory served as the catalyst and primary reader on the topic for over a decade. This facsimile reprint edition of the original University of Chicago Press volume includes a new foreword by Gordon R. Willey, which outlines the state of American archaeology at the time of the original publication, and a new introduction by the editors to place the book in historical context. The bibliography is exhaustive. Academic libraries, students, professionals, and knowledgeable amateurs will welcome this new edition of a standard-maker among texts on American archaeology.

Caciques and Cemi Idols

Author: José R. Oliver
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817355159
Release Date: 2009-05-10
Genre: History

Caciques and Cemi Idolstakes a close look at the relationship between humans and other (non-human) beings that are imbued with cemí power, specifically within the Taíno inter-island cultural sphere encompassing Puerto Rico and Hispaniola.

Critical Approaches to Fieldwork

Author: Gavin Lucas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134564309
Release Date: 2002-01-04
Genre: Social Science

This work takes as its starting point the role of fieldwork and how this has changed over the past 150 years. The author argues against progressive accounts of fieldwork and instead places it in its broader intellectual context to critically examine the relationship between theoretical paradigms and everyday archaeological practice. In providing a much-needed historical and critical evaluation of current practice in archaeology, this book opens up a topic of debate which affects all archaeologists, whatever their particular interests.

The Archaeology of the Caribbean

Author: Samuel M. Wilson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139465298
Release Date: 2007-07-30
Genre: Social Science

A comprehensive synthesis of Caribbean prehistory from the earliest settlement by humans more than 4000 years BC, to the time of European conquest of the islands. The Caribbean was the last large area in the Americas to be populated, and its relative isolation allowed unique cultures to develop. Samuel Wilson reviews the evidence for migration and cultural change throughout the archipelago, dealing in particular with periods of cultural interaction when groups with different cultures and histories were in contact. He also examines the evolving relationship of the Caribbean people with their environment, as they developed increasingly productive economic systems over time, as well as the emergence of increasingly complex social and political systems, particularly in the Greater Antilles in the centuries before the European conquest. Wilson also provides a review of the history of Caribbean archaeology and the individual scholars and ideas that have shaped the field.

Envisioning Landscape

Author: Dan Hicks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781315429519
Release Date: 2016-06-03
Genre: Social Science

The common feature of landscape archaeology is its diversity – of method, field location, disciplinary influences and contemporary voices. The contributors to this volume take advantage of these many strands to investigate landscape archaeology in its multiple forms, focusing primarily on the link to heritage, the impact on our understanding of temporality, and the situated theory that arises out of landscape studies. Using examples from New York to Northern Ireland, Africa to the Argolid, these pieces capture the human significance of material objects in support of a more comprehensive, nuanced archaeology.

Archaeology in Latin America

Author: Benjamin Alberti
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134597833
Release Date: 2005-08-16
Genre: Social Science

This pioneering and comprehensive survey is the first overview of current themes in Latin American archaeology written solely by academics native to the region, and it makes their collected expertise available to an English-speaking audience for the first time. The contributors cover the most significant issues in the archaeology of Latin America, such as the domestication of camelids, the emergence of urban society in Mesoamerica, the frontier of the Inca empire, and the relatively little known archaeology of the Amazon basin. This book draws together key areas of research in Latin American archaeological thought into a coherent whole; no other volume on this area has ever dealt with such a diverse range of subjects, and some of the countries examined have never before been the subject of a regional study.

Communities in Contact

Author: Corinne Lisette Hofman
Publisher: Sidestone Press
ISBN: 9789088900631
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

"Communities in Contact represents the outcome of the Fourth International Leiden in the Caribbean symposium, entitled "From Prehistory to Ethnography in the circum-Caribbean." The contributions included in this volume cover a wide range of topics from avariety of disciplines - archaeology, bioarchaeology, ethnohistory and ethnography - revolving around the themes of mobility and exchange, culture contact, and settlement and community. The application of innovative approaches and the multi-dimensional character of these essays have provided exiting new perspectives on the indigenous communities of the circum-Caribbean and Amazonian regions throughout prehistory until the present."--pub. desc.

Theory in Archaeology

Author: Peter J. Ucko
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134843466
Release Date: 2005-08-10
Genre: Social Science

Theory in Archaeology tackles important questions about the diversity in archaeological theory and practice which face the discipline in the 1990s. What is the relationship between theory and practice? How does `World' archaeological theory differ from `European'? Can one be a good practitioner without theory? This unique book brings together contributors from many different countries and continents to provide the first truly global perspective on archaeological theory. They examine the nature of material culture studies and look at problems of ethnicity, regionalism, and nationality. They consider, too, another fundamental of archaeological inquiry: can our research be objective, or must `the past' always be a relativistic construction? Theory in Archaeology is an important book whose authors bring together very different perceptions of the past. Its wide scope and interest will attract an international readership among students and academics alike.

The Earliest Inhabitants

Author: Lesley-Gail Atkinson
Publisher: University of West Indies Press
ISBN: 9766401497
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

This book highlights the variety of research conducted on the island's prehistoric site and artifacts. The text is a compilation of thirteen articles, five of which had been previously published but not widely available. The remaining eight new articles are based on archaeological research within the last five years. The book will appeal to a wide audience of archaeologists, historians, students of archaeology and anyone interested in Jamaica's history

The Clay Sleeps

Author: Richard A. Krause
Publisher: University Alabama Press
ISBN: UOM:39015008636287
Release Date: 1985
Genre: Art


The Aborigines of Puerto Rico and Neighboring Islands

Author: Jesse Walter Fewkes
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817355746
Release Date: 2009-05-26
Genre: History

A valuable recounting of the first formal archaeological excavations in Puerto Rico. Originally published as the Twenty-Fifth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in 1907, this book was praised in an article in American Anthropologist as doing "more than any other to give a comprehensive idea of the archaeology of the West Indies." Until that time, for mainly political reasons, little scientific research had been conducted by Americans on any of the Caribbean islands. Dr. Fewkes' unique skills of observation and experience served him well in the quest to understand Caribbean prehistory and culture. This volume, the result of his careful fieldwork in Puerto Rico in 1902-04, is magnificently illustrated by 93 plates and 43 line drawings of specimens from both public and private collections of the islands. A 1907 article in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland described the volume as "a most valuable contribution to ethnographical science."

Amotopoan Trails

Author: Jimmy Mans
Publisher: Sidestone Press
ISBN: 9789088900983
Release Date: 2012-12-31
Genre: History

In this book the concept of mobility is explored for the archaeology of the Amazonian and Caribbean region. As a result of technological and methodological progress in archaeology, mobility has become increasingly visible on the level of the individual. However, as a concept it does not seem to fit with current approaches in Amazonian archaeology, which favour a move away from viewing small mobile groups as models for the deeper past. Instead of ignoring such ethnographic tyrannies, in this book they are considered to be essential for arriving at a different past. Viewing archaeological mobility as the sum of movements of both people and objects, the empirical part of Amotopoan Trails focuses on Amotopo, a small contemporary Trio village in the interior of Suriname. The movements of the Amotopoans are tracked and positioned in a century of Trio dynamics, ultimately yielding a recent archaeology of Surinamese-Trio movements for the Sipaliwini River basin (1907-2008). Alongside the construction of this archaeology, novel mobility concepts are introduced. They provide the conceptual footholds which enable the envisioning of mobility at various temporal scales, from a decade up to a century, the sequence of which has remained a blind spot in Caribbean and Amazonian archaeology.

Andean Expressions

Author: George F. Lau
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 9781587299742
Release Date: 2011-04-16
Genre: Social Science

Flourishing from A.D. 1 to 700, the Recuay inhabited lands in northern Peru just below the imposing glaciers of the highest mountain chain in the tropics. Thriving on an economy of high-altitude crops and camelid herding, they left behind finely made artworks and grand palatial buildings with an unprecedented aesthetic and a high degree of technical sophistication. In this first in-depth study of these peoples, George Lau situates the Recuay within the great diversification of cultural styles associated with the Early Intermediate Period, provides new and significant evidence to evaluate models of social complexity, and offers fresh theories about life, settlement, art, and cosmology in the high Andes. Lau crafts a nuanced social and historical model in order to evaluate the record of Recuay developments as part of a wider Andean prehistory. He analyzes the rise and decline of Recuay groups as well as their special interactions with the Andean landscape. Their coherence was expressed as shared culture, community, and corporate identity, but Lau also reveals its diversity through time and space in order to challenge the monolithic characterizations of Recuay society pervasive in the literature today. Many of the innovations in Recuay culture, revealed for the first time in this landmark volume, left a lasting impact on Andean history and continue to have relevance today. The author highlights the ways that material things intervened in ancient social and political life, rather than being merely passive reflections of historical change, to show that Recuay public art, exchange, technological innovations, warfare, and religion offer key insights into the emergence of social hierarchy and chiefly leadership and the formation, interaction, and later dissolution of large discrete polities. By presenting Recuay artifacts as fundamentally social in the sense of creating and negotiating relations among persons, places, and things, he recognizes in the complexities of the past an enduring order and intelligence that shape the contours of history.