American Courts Process and Policy

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9780495916376
Release Date: 2012-01-01
Genre: Political Science

The highly respected AMERICAN COURTS: PROCESS AND POLICY, by top Courts scholar Lawrence Baum, provides clear descriptions of the courts and the activities of the various courts. The Seventh Edition explains what courts do, how people within them behave, and how they relate to the rest of the political system. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

American Courts Process and Policy

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781133709428
Release Date: 2012-01-01
Genre: Political Science

The highly respected AMERICAN COURTS: PROCESS AND POLICY, by top Courts scholar Lawrence Baum, provides clear descriptions of the courts and the activities of the various courts. The Seventh Edition explains what courts do, how people within them behave, and how they relate to the rest of the political system. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

American Courts Process and Policy

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: Nelson Education
ISBN: 9781133709428
Release Date: 2012-01-01
Genre: Education

The highly respected AMERICAN COURTS: PROCESS AND POLICY, by top Courts scholar Lawrence Baum, provides clear descriptions of the courts and the activities of the various courts. The Seventh Edition explains what courts do, how people within them behave, and how they relate to the rest of the political system. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

American Courts Process and Policy

Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 9781467285575
Release Date: 2016-10-16
Genre: Education

Facts101 is your complete guide to American Courts , Process and Policy. In this book, you will learn topics such as as those in your book plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

America s Courts and the Criminal Justice System

Author: David W. Neubauer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781337557894
Release Date: 2018-01-01
Genre: Education

The premier choice for Courts courses for decades, this popular text offers a comprehensive explanation of the courts and the criminal justice system, presented in a streamlined, straightforward manner that appeals to instructors and students alike. Neubauer and Fradella's crisp and clear writing, characterized by the organization of material into brief sections within chapters, ensures that readers gain a firm handle on the material. At the same time, the text's innovative courtroom workhouse model -- which focuses on the interrelationships among the judge, prosecutor, and defense attorney -- brings the courtroom to life. AMERICA'S COURTS AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM has long been known for the way it gives students an accurate glimpse of what it is like to work within the American criminal justice system, and the thirteenth edition is no exception. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Politics of Precedent on the U S Supreme Court

Author: Thomas G. Hansford
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691188041
Release Date: 2018-06-05
Genre: Law

The Politics of Precedent on the U.S. Supreme Court offers an insightful and provocative analysis of the Supreme Court's most important task--shaping the law. Thomas Hansford and James Spriggs analyze a key aspect of legal change: the Court's interpretation or treatment of the precedents it has set in the past. Court decisions do not just resolve immediate disputes; they also set broader precedent. The meaning and scope of a precedent, however, can change significantly as the Court revisits it in future cases. The authors contend that these interpretations are driven by an interaction between policy goals and variations in the legal authoritativeness of precedent. From this premise, they build an explanation of the legal interpretation of precedent that yields novel predictions about the nature and timing of legal change. Hansford and Spriggs test their hypotheses by examining how the Court has interpreted the precedents it set between 1946 and 1999. This analysis provides compelling support for their argument, and demonstrates that the justices' ideological goals and the role of precedent are inextricably linked. The two prevailing, yet contradictory, views of precedent--that it acts either solely as a constraint, or as a "cloak" that never actually influences the Court--are incorrect. This book shows that while precedent can operate as a constraint on the justices' decisions, it also represents an opportunity to foster preferred societal outcomes.

The Supreme Court

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 9781483376134
Release Date: 2015-10-05
Genre: Political Science

The Supreme Court, Twelfth Edition, examines all major aspects of the highest court in the nation, from the selection of justices and agenda creation to the decision-making process and the Court’s impact on government and U.S. society. Delving deeply into personalities and procedures, author Lawrence Baum provides a balanced explanation of the Court’s actions and the behavior of its justices as he reveals its complexity, reach, and influence. This new edition gives particular attention to current developments such as the impact of political polarization on the Court, the justices’ increasingly public roles, and recent rulings on same-sex marriage and health care.

Courts and Social Policy

Author: Donald L. Horowitz
Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
ISBN: 0815707312
Release Date: 2010-12-10
Genre: Law

In recent years, the power of American judges to make social policy has been significantly broadened. The courts have reached into many matters once thought to be beyond the customary scope of judicial decisionmaking: education and employment policy, environmental issues, prison and hospital management, and welfare administration—to name a few. This new judicial activity can be traced to various sources, among them the emergence of public interest law firms and interest groups committed to social change through the courts, and to various changes in the law itself that have made access to the courts easier. The propensity for bringing difficult social questions to the judiciary for resolution is likely to persist. This book is the first comprehensive study of the capacity of courts to make and implement social policy. Donald L. Horowitz, a lawyer and social scientist, traces the imprint of the judicial process on the policies that emerge from it. He focuses on a number of important questions: how issues emerge in litigation, how courts obtain their information, how judges use social science data, how legal solutions to social problems are devised, and what happens to judge-made social policy after decrees leave the court house. After a general analysis of the adjudication process as it bears on social policymaking, the author presents four cases studies of litigation involving urban affairs, educational resources, juvenile courts and delinquency, and policy behavior. In each, the assumption and evidence with which the courts approached their policy problems are matched against data about the social settings from which the cases arose and the effects the decrees had. The concern throughout the book is to relate the policy process to the policy outcome. From his analysis of adjudication and the findings of his case studies the author concludes that the resources of the courts are not adequate to the new challenges confronting them. He suggests various improvements, but warns against changes that might impair the traditional strengths of the judicial process.

American Courts Explained

Author: Gregory Mitchell
Publisher: West Academic Publishing
ISBN: 1634598792
Release Date: 2016-03-04
Genre:

American Courts Explained (?ACE?) takes students on a detailed tour of American courts by following two real cases?one criminal, one civil?from the events that gave rise to them, through pre-trial proceedings, jury trials, and appeals. Along the way there are stops in state and federal trial and appellate courts, as well as the U.S. Supreme Court. ACE introduces readers to major debates relating to the courts: How "political" are judges? How well do different methods of selecting judges work? Do ordinary people have adequate access to lawyers? Should we trust jurors to decide complex and emotional cases? But it presents these debates in the context of actual cases so that readers can see why these debates matter to the parties, lawyers, judges, and jurors. The conviction behind this approach is that students learn best when engaged by vivid, interesting cases with details that make abstract debates and difficult legal concepts meaningful and easier to understand. By the end of ACE, readers will find that the judicial process has been demystified. They will have a firm understanding of what litigants, lawyers and judges do, will understand the structure and procedure of American civil and criminal courts, will see the purposes served by judicial rules and procedures, and will see what effect these rules, and procedures have on the outcomes of cases. Readers will have acquired the knowledge needed to critically evaluate the legal institutions we have and proposals for changing them. ACE can serve as a stand-alone text or as a supplement to a textbook that takes a more thematic and less detailed approach to the American judicial process. An accompanying website provides teachers and students with the many legal documents discussed in ACE. These materials may be used for extended study of topics, for class exercises or assignments, or just to provide more detail on the many legal procedures and concepts discussed in ACE. ACE will give students contemplating law school or a career in criminal justice a realistic understanding of what those careers would involve and a head start on the deeper study of American courts required for those career paths.

American Courts and the Judicial Process

Author: G. Larry Mays
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199738858
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Law

American Courts and the Judicial Process examines the many elements of the U.S. court system--its structure, function, and key actors. Author G. Larry Mays discusses the contrast between the law and rules as they are written and the way they play out in the real world. Concise and accessible, American Courts and the Judicial Process is ideal for undergraduate courts courses. SUPPORT PACKAGE: * Instructor's Resource CD containing a Test Bank, sample syllabi, chapter outlines, and PowerPoint-based lecture slides * Companion Website (www.oup.com/us/mays) featuring a downloadable Student Study Guide, a variety of self-quizzes, and brief chapter summaries

Judicial Process in America

Author: Robert A. Carp
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 9781483378275
Release Date: 2015-12-30
Genre: Political Science

Known for shedding light on the link among the courts, public policy, and the political environment, Judicial Process in America provides a comprehensive overview of the American judiciary. In this Tenth Edition, authors Robert A. Carp, Ronald Stidham, Kenneth L. Manning, and Lisa M. Holmes examine the recent Supreme Court rulings on same-sex marriage and health care subsidies, the effect of three women justices on the Court’s patterns of decision, and the policy-making role of state tribunals. Original data on the decision-making behavior of the Obama trial judges—which are unavailable anywhere else—ensure this text’s position as a standard bearer in the field.

Judging Law and Policy

Author: Robert M. Howard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136887604
Release Date: 2012-03-22
Genre: Law

To what extent do courts make social and public policy and influence policy change? This innovative text analyzes this question generally and in seven distinct policy areas that play out in both federal and state courts—tax policy, environmental policy, reproductive rights, sex equality, affirmative action, school finance, and same-sex marriage. The authors address these issues through the twin lenses of how state and federal courts must and do interact with the other branches of government and whether judicial policy-making is a form of activist judging. Each chapter uncovers the policymaking aspects of judicial process by investigating the current state of the law, the extent of court involvement in policy change, the responses of other governmental entities and outside actors, and the factors which influenced the degree of implementation and impact of the relevant court decisions. Throughout the book, Howard and Steigerwalt examine and analyze the literature on judicial policy-making as well as evaluate existing measures of judicial ideology, judicial activism, court and legal policy formation, policy change and policy impact. This unique text offers new insights and areas to research in this important field of American politics.

Judging Policy

Author: Matthew M. Taylor
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804786799
Release Date: 2008-02-26
Genre: Political Science

Courts, like other government institutions, shape public policy. But how are courts drawn into the policy process, and how are patterns of policy debate shaped by the institutional structure of the courts? Drawing on the experience of the Brazilian federal courts since the transition to democracy, Judging Policy examines the judiciary's role in public policy debates. During a period of energetic policy reform, the high salience of many policies, combined with the conducive institutional structure of the judiciary, ensured that Brazilian courts would become an important institution at the heart of the policy process. The Brazilian case thus challenges the notion that Latin America's courts have been uniformly pliant or ineffectual, with little impact on politics and policy outcomes. Judging Policy also inserts the judiciary into the scholarly debate regarding the extent of presidential control of the policy process in Latin America's largest nation. By analyzing the full Brazilian federal court system—including not only the high court, but also trial and appellate courts—the book develops a framework with cross-national implications for understanding how courts may influence policy actors' political strategies and the distribution of power within political systems.

American Judicial Process

Author: Pamela C. Corley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136286568
Release Date: 2015-09-25
Genre: Political Science

This text is a general introduction to American judicial process. The authors cover the major institutions, actors, and processes that comprise the U.S. legal system, viewed from a political science perspective. Grounding their presentation in empirical social science terms, the authors identify popular myths about the structure and processes of American law and courts and then contrast those myths with what really takes place. Three unique elements of this "myth versus reality" framework are incorporated into each of the topical chapters: 1) "Myth versus Reality" boxes that lay out the topics each chapter covers, using the myths about each topic contrasted with the corresponding realities. 2) "Pop Culture" boxes that provide students with popular examples from film, television, and music that tie-in to chapter topics and engage student interest. 3) "How Do We Know?" boxes that discuss the methods of social scientific inquiry and debunk common myths about the judiciary and legal system. Unlike other textbooks, American Judicial Process emphasizes how pop culture portrays—and often distorts—the judicial process and how social science research is brought to bear to provide an accurate picture of law and courts. In addition, a rich companion website will include PowerPoint lectures, suggested topics for papers and projects, a test bank of objective questions for use by instructors, and downloadable artwork from the book. Students will have access to annotated web links and videos, flash cards of key terms, and a glossary.

Making Policy Making Law

Author: Mark C. Miller
Publisher: Georgetown University Press
ISBN: 9781589010253
Release Date: 2004-08-23
Genre: Political Science

The functioning of the U.S. government is a bit messier than Americans would like to think. The general understanding of policymaking has Congress making the laws, executive agencies implementing them, and the courts applying the laws as written—as long as those laws are constitutional. Making Policy, Making Law fundamentally challenges this conventional wisdom, arguing that no dominant institution—or even a roughly consistent pattern of relationships—exists among the various players in the federal policymaking process. Instead, at different times and under various conditions, all branches play roles not only in making public policy, but in enforcing and legitimizing it as well. This is the first text that looks in depth at this complex interplay of all three branches. The common thread among these diverse patterns is an ongoing dialogue among roughly coequal actors in various branches and levels of government. Those interactions are driven by processes of conflict and persuasion distinctive to specific policy arenas as well as by the ideas, institutional realities, and interests of specific policy communities. Although complex, this fresh examination does not render the policymaking process incomprehensible; rather, it encourages scholars to look beyond the narrow study of individual institutions and reach across disciplinary boundaries to discover recurring patterns of interbranch dialogue that define (and refine) contemporary American policy. Making Policy, Making Law provides a combination of contemporary policy analysis, an interbranch perspective, and diverse methodological approaches that speak to a surprisingly overlooked gap in the literature dealing with the role of the courts in the American policymaking process. It will undoubtedly have significant impact on scholarship about national lawmaking, national politics, and constitutional law. For scholars and students in government and law—as well as for concerned citizenry—this book unravels the complicated interplay of governmental agencies and provides a heretofore in-depth look at how the U.S. government functions in reality.