American Legal Realism and Empirical Social Science

Author: John Henry Schlegel
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807864364
Release Date: 2000-11-09
Genre: History

John Henry Schlegel recovers a largely ignored aspect of American Legal Realism, a movement in legal thought in the 1920s and 1930s that sought to bring the modern notion of empirical science into the study and teaching of law. In this book, he explores individual Realist scholars' efforts to challenge the received notion that the study of law was primarily a matter of learning rules and how to manipulate them. He argues that empirical research was integral to Legal Realism, and he explores why this kind of research did not, finally, become a part of American law school curricula. Schlegel reviews the work of several prominent Realists but concentrates on the writings of Walter Wheeler Cook, Underhill Moore, and Charles E. Clark. He reveals how their interest in empirical research was a product of their personal and professional circumstances and demonstrates the influence of John Dewey's ideas on the expression of that interest. According to Schlegel, competing understandings of the role of empirical inquiry contributed to the slow decline of this kind of research by professors of law. Originally published in 1995. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

American Legal Realism

Author: William W. Fisher, III
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195071239
Release Date: 1993
Genre: History

Of Studies in Legal Education (1929) / Edited by Herman Oliphant. "Institute Priests and Yale Observers - A Reply to Dean Goodrich" (1936) / Thurman W. Arnold. "Goodbye to Law Reviews" (1936) / Fred Rodell.

Legal Realism and American Law

Author: Justin Zaremby
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9781441135728
Release Date: 2013-12-05
Genre: Political Science

In the first part of the 20th century, a group of law scholars offered engaging, and occasionally disconcerting, views on the role of judges and the relationship between law and politics in the United States. These legal realists borrowed methods from the social sciences to carefully study the law as experienced by lawyers, judges, and average citizens and promoted a progressive vision for American law and society. Legal realism investigated the nature of legal reasoning, the purpose of law, and the role of judges. The movement asked questions which reshaped the study of jurisprudence and continue to drive lively debates about the law and politics in classrooms, courtrooms, and even the halls of Congress. This thorough analysis provides an introduction to the ideas, context, and leading personalities of legal realism. It helps situate an important movement in legal theory in the context of American politics and political thought and will be of great interest to students of judicial politics, American constitutional development, and political theory.

Legal Realism

Author: Michael Martin
Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated
ISBN: STANFORD:36105062252999
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Law

Martin (philosophy, Boston U.) critically compares and evaluates two versions of an important movement in early 20th-century legal thought. For both he recounts its origins and early development, surveys its main proponents, and considers it as a research program. He also looks at its influence on critical legal studies. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Naturalizing Jurisprudence

Author: Brian Leiter
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 019920649X
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Law

Brian Leiter is widely recognized as the leading philosophical interpreter of the jurisprudence of American Legal Realism, as well as the most influential proponent of the relevance of the naturalistic turn in philosophy to the problems of legal philosophy. This volume collects newly revised versions of ten of his best-known essays, which set out his reinterpretation of the Legal Realists as prescient philosophical naturalists; critically engage with jurisprudential responses to Legal Realism, from legal positivism to Critical Legal Studies; connect the Realist program to the methodology debate in contemporary jurisprudence; and explore the general implications of a naturalistic world view for problems about the objectivity of law and morality. Leiter has supplied a lengthy new introductory essay, as well as postscripts to several of the essays, in which he responds to challenges to his interpretive and philosophical claims by academic lawyers and philosophers. This volume will be essential reading for anyone interested in jurisprudence, as well as for philosophers concerned with the consequences of naturalism in moral and legal philosophy.

Reconstructing American Legal Realism Rethinking Private Law Theory

Author: Hanoch Dagan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199399130
Release Date: 2013-09-19
Genre: Law

In the myriad choices of interpretation judges face when confronted with rules and cases, legal realists are concerned with how these doctrinal materials carry over into judicial outcomes. What can explain past judicial behavior and predict its future course? How can law constrain judgments made by unelected judges? How can the distinction between law and politics be maintained despite the collapse of law's autonomy in its positivist rendition? In Reconstructing American Legal Realism & Rethinking Private Law Theory, Hanoch Dagan provides an innovative and useful interpretation of legal realism. He revives the legal realists' rich account of law as a growing institution accommodating three sets of constitutive tensions-power and reason, science and craft, and tradition and progress-and demonstrates how the major claims attributed to legal realism fit into this conception of law. Dagan seeks to rein in realist descendants who have become fixated on one aspect of the big picture, and to dispel the misconceptions that those gone astray represent the tradition accurately or that realism is now merely a historical signpost. He draws upon the realist texts of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Karl Llewellyn, and others to explain how legal realism offers important and unique jurisprudential insights that are not just a part of legal history, but are also relevant and useful for a contemporary understanding of legal theory. Building on this realist conception of law and enriching its texture, Dagan addresses more particular jurisprudential questions. He shows that the realist achievement in capturing law's irreducible complexity is crucial to the reinvigoration of legal theory as a distinct scholarly subject matter, and is also inspiring for a host of other, more specific theoretical topics, such as the rule of law, the autonomy and taxonomy of private law, the relationships between rights and remedies, and the pluralism and perfectionism that typify private law.

American Legal Realism

Author: Peter Maurice Mikhael
Publisher:
ISBN: OCLC:947810849
Release Date: 2016
Genre: Egypt

Abstract: This paper presents to its readers the progressive legal evolution that has influenced, over the past century, legal reform in American history. It focuses specifically on American legal realist thinking that was considered revolutionary in nature relative to the natural and formalist schools of jurisprudence. The focus then shifts to Egypt where the combination of formal and natural jurisprudence is clear to legal scholars. Omar Effendi, as one of the most prominent case decision in the post-25th January revolution period, was both criticized and lauded for political reasons. Scholars that supported the decision were glad that the corrupt privatization of a well-known company ended with the State Council's decision. Opponents feared that the state courts’ interference in the commercial contractual relationship would negatively affect investment prospects in Egypt. This paper analyzes the application of law in a changing political context and concludes with the proof that legal realists strived to achieve: the implementation and execution of law are pure acts of political choice.

Patterns of American Legal Thought

Author: G. Edward White
Publisher: Quid Pro Books
ISBN: 9781610270175
Release Date: 2010-07-22
Genre: History

A renowned legal historian's collection of astute and timeless essays on such subjects as the process, method and debates of legal history; the truth about Holmes and Brandeis; legal realism & its critics; the origins of tort law; appellate opinions as research sources; Brown v. Board and the role of Earl Warren; and the development of gay rights in U.S. constitutional law. Quality digital format.

Naturalized Jurisprudence and American Legal Realism Revisited

Author: Brian Leiter
Publisher:
ISBN: OCLC:832761609
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Jurisprudence

This is my reply to critics in a symposium issue of the journal Law & Philosophy (2011) devoted to my 2007 book NATURALIZING JURISPRUDENCE: AMERICAN LEGAL REALISM AND NATURALISM IN LEGAL PHILOSOPHY. The critics to whom I respond are: Julie Dickson (Oxford University), Michael Steven Green (College of William & Mary), and Mark Greenberg (University of California, Los Angeles).

The Legal Realism of Jerome N Frank

Author: Julius Paul
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9789401194938
Release Date: 2012-12-06
Genre: Law

Between the Levite at the gate and the judicial systems of our day is a long journey in courthouse government, but its basic structure remains the same - law, judge and process. Of the three, process is the most unstable - procedure and facts. Of the two, facts are the most intractable. While most of the law in books may seem to center about abstract theories, doctrines, princi ples, and rules, the truth is that most of it is designed in some way to escape the painful examination of the facts which bring parties in a particular case to court. Frequently the emphasis is on the rule of law as it is with respect to the negotiable instru ment which forbids inquiry behind its face; sometimes the empha sis is on men as in the case of the wide discretion given a judge or administrator; sometimes on the process, as in pleading to a refined issue, summary judgment, pre-trial conference, or jury trial designed to impose the dirty work of fact finding on laymen. The minds of the men of law never cease to labor at im proving process in the hope that some less painful, more trustworthy and if possible automatic method can be found to lay open or force litigants to disclose what lies inside their quarrel, so that law can be administered with dispatch and de cisiveness in the hope that truth and justice will be served.