Roadside Guide to Indian Ruins Rock Art of the Southwest

Author:
Publisher: Westcliffe Pub
ISBN: WISC:89082383274
Release Date: 2005-01-01
Genre: Architecture

At archeological sites throughout Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah, the ancient inhabitants of the American Southwest have left a rich legacy built and etched in stone - places to witness sheer ingenuity and pay tribute to the roots of Native American culture. With color photographs, maps, and detailed entries, this handsome volume spotlights the most accessible, visitor-friendly sites to explore. Also included are suggested travel routes for those wishing to tour multiple sites.

In Search of the Old Ones

Author: David Roberts
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439127239
Release Date: 2010-05-11
Genre: History

An exuberant, hands-on fly-on-the-wall account that combines the thrill of canyoneering and rock climbing with the intellectual sleuthing of archaeology to explore the Anasazi. David Roberts describes the culture of the Anasazi—the name means “enemy ancestors” in Navajo—who once inhabited the Colorado Plateau and whose modern descendants are the Hopi Indians of Arizona. Archaeologists, Roberts writes, have been puzzling over the Anasazi for more than a century, trying to determine the environmental and cultural stresses that caused their society to collapse 700 years ago. He guides us through controversies in the historical record, among them the haunting question of whether the Anasazi committed acts of cannibalism. Roberts’s book is full of up-to-date thinking on the culture of the ancient people who lived in the harsh desert country of the Southwest.

Ruins and Rivals

Author: James E. Snead
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816523975
Release Date: 2004-02-01
Genre: Social Science

Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University Ruins are as central to the image of the American Southwest as are its mountains and deserts, and antiquity is a key element of modern southwestern heritage. Yet prior to the mid-nineteenth century this rich legacy was largely unknown to the outside world. While military expeditions first brought word of enigmatic relics to the eastern United States, the new intellectual frontier was seized by archaeologists, who used the results of their southwestern explorations to build a foundation for the scientific study of the American past. In Ruins and Rivals, James Snead helps us understand the historical development of archaeology in the Southwest from the 1890s to the 1920s and its relationship with the popular conception of the region. He examines two major research traditions: expeditions dispatched from the major eastern museums and those supported by archaeological societies based in the Southwest itself. By comparing the projects of New York's American Museum of Natural History with those of the Southwest Museum in Los Angeles and the Santa Fe-based School of American Archaeology, he illustrates the way that competition for status and prestige shaped the way that archaeological remains were explored and interpreted. The decades-long competition between institutions and their advocates ultimately created an agenda for Southwest archaeology that has survived into modern times. Snead takes us back to the days when the field was populated by relic hunters and eastern "museum men" who formed uneasy alliances among themselves and with western boosters who used archaeology to advance their own causes. Richard Wetherill, Frederic Ward Putnam, Charles Lummis, and other colorful characters all promoted their own archaeological endeavors before an audience that included wealthy patrons, museum administrators, and other cultural figures. The resulting competition between scholarly and public interests shifted among museum halls, legislative chambers, and the drawing rooms of Victorian America but always returned to the enigmatic ruins of Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde. Ruins and Rivals contains a wealth of anecdotal material that conveys the flavor of digs and discoveries, scholars and scoundrels, tracing the origins of everything from national monuments to "Santa Fe Style." It rekindles the excitement of discovery, illustrating the role that archaeology played in creating the southwestern "past" and how that image of antiquity continues to exert its influence today.

Richard Wetherill

Author: Frank McNitt
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826303293
Release Date: 1966
Genre: Social Science


Indian Rock Art of the Southwest

Author: Polly Schaafsma
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826309135
Release Date: 1986
Genre: Art

This comprehensive view of carvings and paintings on stone by Native Americans from 200 B.C. through the nineteenth century surveys the rock art of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, northern Mexico, and west Texas, providing an incomparable visual record of Southwest Indian culture, religion, and society. Rock carvings and paintings are important sources in the archaeological and historical interpretation of Southwest Indians. Rock art reflects the cosmic and mythic orientation of the culture that produced it, and understanding of prehistoric peoples, both hunters and gatherers and the Hohokam, Anasazi, Mogollon, and Fremont cultures, and the Pueblo, Navajo, and Apache Indians. Culturally significant events such as the shift in prehistoric times from spear and atlatl to the bow, or, in the historic period, the introduction of the horse into the Southwest, are recorded in rock art. The illustrations--thirty-two color plates, nearly 250 photographs, and numerous line drawings--bring together in one volume petroglyphs and rock paintings that are scattered over thousands of miles of desert and mesa, giving the reader an overview of Indian rock art that would be nearly impossible to achieve in the field. Indian Rock Art of the Southwestexamines from an archaeological perspective the rich legacy of stone drawings and carvings preserved throughout the Southwest. Professional and amateur archaeologists and historians, as well as the general reader with an interest in Indian art, will find this volume a valuable resource.

The Cliff Dwellings Speak

Author: Beth Sagstetter
Publisher: Benchmark Publishing (Company)
ISBN: 0964582422
Release Date: 2010-01-01
Genre: Archaeology and history

This book is intended as an introduction to Southwestern Archaeology, for casual visitors. The book will guide you around a site in Sherlock Holmes fashion, giving you very real tools for understanding cliff dwellings. The Cliff Dwellings Speak also introduces readers to the descendants of the cliff dwellers -- the Pueblo people of the Southwest who still live there today. The book is highly illustrated with black and white photographs and engravings from rare antique books. Using copious illustrations, Field Guides in some chapters show the reader what to look for, and what it might mean. The Cliff Dwellings Speak is unique and is very different from any other book regarding understanding the Greater American Southwest (views of Native American, Anasazi, ruins at Mesa Verde, Colorado; landscape images of Colorado).

Hiking Ruins Seldom Seen

Author: Dave Wilson
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780762768820
Release Date: 2011-05-03
Genre: Sports & Recreation

Information on 37 archaeological sites in Arizona, Utah, and New Mexico.

A History of the Ancient Southwest

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: STANFORD:36105124167052
Release Date: 2009
Genre: History

According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."

House of Rain

Author: Craig Childs
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9780759518575
Release Date: 2007-02-22
Genre: History

The greatest "unsolved mystery" of the American Southwest is the fate of the Anasazi, the native peoples who in the eleventh century converged on Chaco Canyon (in today's southwestern New Mexico) and built what has been called the Las Vegas of its day, a flourishing cultural center that attracted pilgrims from far and wide, a vital crossroads of the prehistoric world. The Anasazis' accomplishments - in agriculture, in art, in commerce, in architecture, and in engineering - were astounding, rivaling those of the Mayans in distant Central America. By the thirteenth century, however, the Anasazi were gone from Chaco. Vanished. What was it that brought about the rapid collapse of their civilization? Was it drought? pestilence? war? forced migration? mass murder or suicide? For many years conflicting theories have abounded. Craig Childs draws on the latest scholarly research, as well as on a lifetime of adventure and exploration in the most forbidding landscapes of the American Southwest, to shed new light on this compelling mystery.

Cowboys cave dwellers

Author: Fred M. Blackburn
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: STANFORD:36105019238224
Release Date: 1997
Genre: History

The tortuous canyon country of southeastern Utah conceals thousands of archaeological sites, ancient homes of the ancestors of today's Southwest Indian peoples. Late in the 19th century, adventurous cowboy-archaeologists made the first forays into the canyons in search of the material remains of these prehistoric cultures, called "basketmaker". Rancher Richard Wetherill and numerous other adventurers, scholars, preachers, and businessmen mounted expeditions into the area now known as Grand Gulch. With varying degrees of scientific rigor, they mapped and dug the canyon's rich archaeological sites, removing large numbers of artifacts and burial goods to exhibit or sell back home. Almost 100 years after these explorers matte their way through the Gulch, a group of avocational archaeologists began to track the original explorers by tracing the signatures they had left on the canyon walls as they moved from site to site. This adventure grew into the Whetherill-Grand Gulch Project, an effort to recover the history and discover the current whereabouts of the many artifacts extracted from southeastern Utah's arid soil. In Cowboys and Cave Dwellers, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Cowboys and Cave DwelLers is lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs, many of them by Bruce Hucko, author and photographer of Where There Is No Name for Art.

Cedar Mesa

Author:
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816522340
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Travel

Cedar Mesa, Utah, offers adventurous visitors magnificent examples of all the geologic wonders that define "canyon country" throughout the Southwest: stone arches, natural bridges, and breath-sucking precipices, plus hidden springs, hanging gardens, and a treasure of pre-Columbian Indian ruins.

The Anasazi of Chaco Canyon

Author: Kyle Widner
Publisher: Anasazi of Chaco Canyon: The Greatest True Mys the Anasazi of Chaco Canyon: The Greatest True Myster
ISBN: 0692740023
Release Date: 2016-06-19
Genre:

Perhaps the most fascinating chapter in Southwest history is the tale of the mysterious, "vanished" Anasazi Indians. Their tremendous achievements can be found in many places, including the spectacular cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde National Park. But the crest of the Anasazi wave was in Chaco Canyon, a shallow, windswept wash in northwest New Mexico. Here, 1,000 years ago, strange and unexplained events unfolded; events which continue to intrigue scientists and visitors today. During the years 850-1150 AD, multi-story buildings comparable in size to the Roman Coliseum were constructed. Advanced astronomy, water works, and agriculture flourished. Exotic artifacts from Central America were traded over routes spanning thousands of miles. And after 300 years, they carefully sealed everything up, left, and never returned. The Anasazi of Chaco Canyon offers insight into the unknowns of the "Chaco Phenomenon," including the story of Kyle's journey of discovery. In addition, it draws on the latest research, personal experiences, and interpretations of oral traditions, leading the reader to a startling conclusion. Influenced by the writings of Edward Abbey and James Michener, Kyle Widner is a desert wanderer, amateur Anasazi ruins hunter, and internet business expert in his spare time. He lives in Boulder City, Nevada with his wife Jean, two golden retrievers, and two cats. This book is the companion guide to an educational video game and 3D computer simulation of Chaco Canyon for Mac and PC computers. Learn more at Shadowplay.com.