Anthropological Practice

Author: Judith Okely
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 9780857850928
Release Date: 2013-09-12
Genre: Social Science

Anthropologists are increasingly pressurised to formulate field methods for teaching. Unlike many hypothesis-driven ethnographic texts, this book is designed with the specific needs of the anthropology student and field researcher in mind, with particular emphasis on the core anthropological method: long term participant observation. Anthropological Practice explores fieldwork experiences unique to anthropology, and provides the context by which to explain and develop practice-based and open-ended methodology. It draws on dialogues with over twenty established and younger anthropologists, whose fieldwork spans the late 1960s to the present day, taking place in locations as diverse as Europe, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, Africa, Iran, Afghanistan, North and South America. Revealing first-hand and hitherto unrecorded aspects of fieldwork, Anthropological Practice provides critical, systematic ways to enhance anthropological and alternative knowledge. It is an essential text for anthropology students and researchers, and for all disciplines concerned with ethnography. Interviewees include: Paul Clough, Roy Gigengack, Louise de la Gorgendière, Suzette Heald, Michael Herzfeld, Signe Howell, Felicia Hughes-Freeland, Ignacy Marek Kaminski, Margaret Kenna, Raquel Alonso Lopez, Malcolm Mcleod, Brian Morris, Hélène Neveu Kringelbach, Akira Okazaki, Joanna Overing, Jonathan Parry, Carol Silverman, Mohammad Talib, Nancy Lindisfarne-Tapper, Sue Wright, Helena Wulff, Joseba Zulaika.

Ethnographic Fieldwork

Author: Antonius C. G. M. Robben
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470657157
Release Date: 2012-01-24
Genre: Social Science

Newly revised, Ethnographic Fieldwork: An Anthropological Reader Second Edition provides readers with a picture of the breadth, variation, and complexity of fieldwork. The updated selections offer insight into the ethnographer?s experience of gathering and analyzing data, and a richer understanding of the conflicts, hazards and ethical challenges of pursuing fieldwork around the globe. Offers an international collection of classic and contemporary readings to provide students with a broad understanding of historical, methodological, ethical, reflexive and stylistic issues in fieldwork Features 16 new articles and revised part introductions, with additional insights into the experience of conducting ethnographic fieldwork Explores the importance of fieldwork practice in achieving the core theoretical and methodological goals of anthropology Highlights the personal and professional challenges of field researchers, from issues of professional identity, fieldwork relations, activism, and the conflicts, hazards and ethical concerns of community work.

Practicing Ethnography

Author: Lynda Mannik
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781487593124
Release Date: 2017-11-20
Genre: Social Science

This methods book is theoretically informed but practical in approach, and reflects the challenges and concerns of contemporary ethnography in North America. The authors emphasize an inductive, ethnographic approach to research. Each chapter offers an overview of a particular method, methodological issue, or research trend, followed by an extended ethnographic vignette--written exclusively for this volume--by contemporary anthropologists about their fieldwork experiences. These highly readable vignettes showcase how ethnography informs contemporary anthropological theory, offering a unique way to discuss major concepts, methods, and methodologies. "Try This" and "Possible Projects" sections encourage newcomers to anthropology to apply what they have learned in their own ethnographic experiences.

Ethnographic Practice in the Present

Author: Marit Melhuus
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1845456165
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Social Science

In its assessment of the current "state of play" of ethnographic practice in social anthropology, this volume explores the challenges that changing social forms and changing understandings of "the field" pose to contemporary ethnographic methods. These challenges include the implications of the remarkable impact social anthropology is having on neighboring disciplines such as history, sociology, cultural studies, human geography and linguistics, as well as the potential 'costs' of this success for the discipline. Contributors also discuss how the ethnographic method is influenced by current institutional contexts and historical "traditions" across a range of settings. Here ethnography is featured less as a methodological "tool-box" or technique but rather as a subject on which to reflect.

Handbook of Methods in Cultural Anthropology

Author: H. Russell Bernard
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780759120723
Release Date: 2014-07-08
Genre: Social Science

Draws on both science and humanism to explore the scope of contemporary anthropological fieldwork in practice. This thoroughly revised second edition also features new chapters addressing online ethnography; mixed methods and social survey research; and network and geospatial analysis.

Doing Anthropological Research

Author: Natalie Konopinski
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135010133
Release Date: 2013-08-15
Genre: Social Science

Doing Anthropological Research provides a practical toolkit for carrying out research. It works through the process chapter by chapter, from the planning and proposal stage to methodologies, secondary research, ethnographic fieldwork, ethical concerns, and writing strategies. Case study examples are provided throughout to illustrate the particular issues and dilemmas that may be encountered. This handy guide will be invaluable to upper-level undergraduate and postgraduate students who are studying or intending to use anthropological methods in their research.

Out of the Study and Into the Field

Author: Robert Parkin
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1845456955
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Social Science

Outside France, French anthropology is conventionally seen as being dominated by grand theory produced by writers who have done little or no fieldwork themselves, and who may not even count as anthropologists in terms of the institutional structures of French academia. This applies to figures from Durkheim to Derrida, Mauss to Foucault, though there are partial exceptions, such as Lévi-Strauss and Bourdieu. It has led to a contrast being made, especially perhaps in the Anglo-Saxon world, between French theory relying on rational inference, and British empiricism based on induction and generally skeptical of theory. While there are contrasts between the two traditions, this is essentially a false view. It is this aspect of French anthropology that this collection addresses, in the belief that the neglect of many of these figures outside France is seriously distorting our view of the French tradition of anthropology overall. At the same time, the collection will provide a positive view of the French tradition of ethnography, stressing its combination of technical competence and the sympathies of its practitioners for its various ethnographic subjects.

Working Images

Author: Sarah Pink
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 0415306418
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Social Science

Visual methods offer increasingly accessible & popular resources for ethnographic research. In 'Working Images' experts describe how visual methods can be integrated into fieldwork to produce & communicate knowledge about our own & other cultures.

Ethnographic Artifacts

Author: S. R. Jaarsma
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824823028
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Social Science

Ethnographic Artifacts: Challenges to a Reflexive Anthropology examines anthropological practice and uh_product, confronting issues of representation and the power of discourse in the lives and practice of both those doing research and of those being researched. Using eight case studies by ethnographers who share extensive research experience in the Pacific, the volume outlines the trouble with ethnography so representative of the end of this century, where ethnography itself is perceived as a codification of contested relations. Ethnographic Artifacts takes a unique approach to the social life of ethnography. The editors identify three domains in which ethnographic artifacts are given meaning: as text, as object, and as a historically contrived representation of the community in the public sphere. By allowing that analysis of the life of ethnography is important in all three of these domains, appreciation moves beyond narrow rhetorical and textual concerns. The volume provides a multi-faceted means for the reflexive understanding of the production, distribution, and reception of ethnography. Its goal is not mere documentation but rather the assessment of the ethical dimensions of the discipline's practice in a globalizing world. By melding ethical concerns with reflection on the text and the object itself, Ethnographic Artifacts adds dimension to the now well-established reflexive literature. Contributors: Niko Besnier, Jonathan Friedman, Michael Goldsmith, Sjoerd R. Jaarsma, Grant McCall, Mary N. MacDonald, Judith Macdonald, Toon van Meijl, Marta A. Rohatynskyj.

Fieldwork is Not what it Used to be

Author: James D. Faubion
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801475112
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Social Science

Over the past two decades anthropologists have been challenged to rethink the nature of ethnographic research, the meaning of fieldwork, and the role of ethnographers. Ethnographic fieldwork has cultural, social, and political ramifications that have been much discussed and acted upon, but the training of ethnographers still follows a very traditional pattern; this volume engages and takes its point of departure in the experiences of ethnographers-in-the-making that encourage alternative models for professional training in fieldwork and its intellectual contexts. The work done by contributors to Fieldwork Is Not What It Used to Be articulates, at the strategic point of career-making research, features of this transformation in progress. Setting aside traditional anxieties about ethnographic authority, the authors revisit fieldwork with fresh initiative. In search of better understandings of the contemporary research process itself, they assess the current terms of the engagement of fieldworkers with their subjects, address the constructive, open-ended forms by which the conclusions of fieldwork might take shape, and offer an accurate and useful description of what it means to become—and to be—an anthropologist today. Contributors: Lisa Breglia, George Mason University; Jae A. Chung, Aalen University; James D. Faubion, Rice University; Michael M. J. Fischer, MIT; Kim Fortun, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; Jennifer A. Hamilton, Hampshire College; Christopher M. Kelty, UCLA; George E. Marcus, University of California, Irvine; Nahal Naficy, Rice University; Kristin Peterson, University of California, Irvine; Deepa S. Reddy, University of Houston-Clear Lake