Anthropology and Public Health

Author: Robert A. Hahn
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195374643
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Medical

Through 24 case studies from around the world, the volume provides a powerful argument for the imperative of anthropological perspectives, methods, information, and collaboration in the understanding and practice of public health.

Anthropology and Public Health Bridging Differences in Culture and Society

Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 9781467264990
Release Date: 2016-09-26
Genre: Education

Facts101 is your complete guide to Anthropology and Public Health, Bridging Differences in Culture and Society. In this book, you will learn topics such as Anthropological Evaluations of Public Health Initiatives, Anthropological Critiques of Public Health Policy, plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

Transdisciplinary Public Health

Author: Debra Haire-Joshu
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118415344
Release Date: 2013-05-09
Genre: Medical

"This book makes a great leap in the conceptualization of transdisciplinary approaches, as well as provides concrete examples in practice, teaching, policy, and research." —From the Foreword by Edward F. Lawlor, dean and the William E. Gordon Distinguished Professor, the Brown School; and founding director, Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis The complexity of public health and social problems is becoming more challenging. Understanding and designing solutions for these problems requires perspectives from multiple disciplines and fields as well as cross-disciplinary research and practice teams. Transdisciplinary Public Health fills a void in the literature and offers a comprehensive text that introduces transdisciplinary methods as a means for providing an innovative tool set for problem-solving in public health research and practice. With contributions from leading experts, Transdisciplinary Public Health offers an understanding of interactions among the biological, behavioral, social, and public health sciences; shared disciplinary frameworks in analyzing health problems; and the integration and evaluation of transdisciplinary solutions to alleviate complex public health issues. Use of this important resource will promote transdisciplinary research and practice, resulting in novel solutions that positively impact human health.

Stories of Culture and Place

Author: Michael Kenny
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442607941
Release Date: 2014-11-20
Genre: Social Science

This original introduction to cultural anthropology is a textbook like no other. Structured as a narrative rather than a compendium of facts about cultures and concepts, it invites students to think of anthropology as a series of stories that emerge from cultural encounters in particular times and places. These moments of encounter are illustrated with reference to both classic and contemporary ethnographic examples--from Coming of Age in Samoa to Coming of Age in Second Life--allowing readers to grasp anthropology's sometimes problematic past, while still capturing the excitement and potential of the discipline.

Breathing Spaces

Author: Nancy N. Chen
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231502214
Release Date: 2003-06-04
Genre: Social Science

The charismatic form of healing called qigong, based on meditative breathing exercises, has achieved enormous popularity in China during the last two decades. Qigong served a critical social organizational function, as practitioners formed new informal networks, sometimes on an international scale, at a time when China was shifting from state-subsidized medical care to for-profit market medicine. The emergence of new psychological states deemed to be deviant led the Chinese state to "medicalize" certain forms while championing scientific versions of qigong. By contrast, qigong continues to be promoted outside China as a traditional healing practice. Breathing Spaces brings to life the narratives of numerous practitioners, healers, psychiatric patients, doctors, and bureaucrats, revealing the varied and often dramatic ways they cope with market reform and social changes in China.

Encyclopedia of Public Health A C

Author: Lester Breslow
Publisher: MacMillan Reference Library
ISBN: 0028653505
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Public health

This four-volume reference offers the lay reader information about important aspects of the sciences, arts, practical skills, organization, essential functions, and historical traditions of the public health field.

Plagues and Epidemics

Author: D. Ann Herring
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 9781847887559
Release Date: 2010-04-01
Genre: Social Science

Until recently, plagues were thought to belong in the ancient past. Now there are deep worries about global pandemics. This book presents views from anthropology about this much publicized and complex problem. The authors take us to places where epidemics are erupting, waning, or gone, and to other places where they have not yet arrived, but where a frightening story line is already in place. They explore public health bureaucracies and political arenas where the power lies to make decisions about what is, and is not, an epidemic. They look back into global history to uncover disease trends and look ahead to a future of expanding plagues within the context of climate change. The chapters are written from a range of perspectives, from the science of modeling epidemics to the social science of understanding them. Patterns emerge when people are engulfed by diseases labeled as epidemics but which have the hallmarks of plague. There are cycles of shame and blame, stigma, isolation of the sick, fear of contagion, and end-of-the-world scenarios. Plague, it would seem, is still among us.

Culture and cancer care

Author: Simon Dein
Publisher: Open Univ Pr
ISBN: 0335214592
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Medical

Cancer is more than a biological disease. Cultural factors are involved at every stage in the journey through cancer, from prevention to palliative care.Based upon recent studies from the United Kingdom, Europe and the United States, Culture and Cancer Care examines a number of cultural themes in relation to cancer, including:The disparity of rates of cancer among different ethnic groupsCulture and screeningBreaking bad news and communicationCultural variations in emotional responses to cancerCultural variability in cancer treatments and the influence on prognosisPalliative care across culturesThe book focuses on three main themes: culture, race and ethnicity and their relationship to cancer; the cultural context of sickness and help-seeking behaviour; the shift from biomedicine to alternative forms of treatment. Throughout the book, a critical stance is adopted towards race and culture, focusing on the relation between these concepts and social deprivation.Culture and Cancer Care is key reading for students, researchers and practitioners in oncology and palliative care, offering a clear analysis of cultural differences with regard to illness and health care, as well as suggestions of how ethnic disparities can be overcome both at a political and local level, through cultural understanding and culturally appropriate health education.

Confronting Cancer

Author: Juliet Marie McMullin
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN: 1934691097
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Health & Fitness

In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail.

Global health

Author: Mark Nichter
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816525730
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Medical

In this lesson-packed book, Mark Nichter, one of the world's leading medical anthropologists, summarizes what more than a quarter-century of health social science research has contributed to international health and elucidates what social science research can contribute to global health and the study of biopolitics in the future. Nichter focuses on our cultural understanding of infectious and vector-borne diseases, how they are understood locally, and how various populations respond to public health interventions. The book examines the perceptions of three groups whose points of view on illness, health care, and the politics of responsibility often differ and frequently conflict: local populations living in developing countries, public health practitioners working in international health, and health planners/policy makers. The book is written for both health social scientists working in the fields of international health and development and public health practitioners interested in learning practical lessons they can put to good use when engaging communities in participatory problem solving. Global Health critically examines representations that frame international health discourse. It also addresses the politics of what is possible in a world compelled to work together to face emerging and re-emerging diseases, the control of health threats associated with political ecology and defective modernization, and the rise of new assemblages of people who share a sense of biosociality. The book proposes research priorities for a new program of health social science research. Nichter calls for greater involvement by social scientists in studies of global health and emphasizes how medical anthropologists in particular can better involve themselves as scholar activists.

Mexican Community Health and the Politics of Health Reform

Author: Suzanne D. Schneider
Publisher:
ISBN: NWU:35556041072638
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Medical

The struggle of Mexicans to secure quality health care is the focal point of this study. Large-scale transformations in Mexico's national health care system have resulted in budget cuts, increased user fees and decreased public services. At the local level community-based health groups that practice popular medicine are addressing the challenge by training health promoters in a variety of preventive and healing practices and offering low-cost services in community clinics. Their health care approach integrates local and global practices ranging from Mexican herbalism to Chinese medicine. Suzanne Schneider's ethnographic study of grassroots health groups in Morelos, Mexico, addresses the lives of the participants and the groups' contributions to community health. What draws women to these groups? Are they reacting to their experiences with formal health care? To what extent are the groups' teachings applied in the household and accepted throughout the community? Does group participation offer women new sources of empowerment or avenues to income generation? Does the government support these groups? How do they fit into larger trends of health care reform and the shift toward privatization? Taking a political economic approach, Schneider examines the conditions under which community-based health groups are emerging and explores the ways different constituencies address health dilemmas. She delineates future roles for new participants in health care, new models of community health, and a new medical pluralism.