Anthropology

Author: Robert L. Welsch
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199947597
Release Date: 2016-11-14
Genre:

From the authors who wrote the highly acclaimed Cultural Anthropology: Asking Question About Humanity, this ground-breaking general anthropology text--co-written with renowned scholar Agust�n Fuentes--takes a holistic approach that emphasizes critical thinking, active learning, and applying anthropology to solve contemporary human problems. Building on the classical foundations of the discipline, Anthropology: Asking Questions about Human Origins, Diversity, and Culture shows students how anthropology is connected to such current topics as food, health and medicine, and the environment. Full of relevant examples and current topics--with a focus on contemporary problems and questions--the book demonstrates the diversity and dynamism of anthropology today.

Cultural Anthropology

Author: Robert L. Welsch
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190679026
Release Date: 2017-10-20
Genre: Social Science

What is cultural anthropology, and how can it explain--or even help resolve--contemporary human problems? Robert L. Welsch and Luis A. Vivanco's Cultural Anthropology: Asking Questions About Humanity, Second Edition, uses a questions-based approach to teach students how to think anthropologically, helping them view cultural issues and everyday experiences as an anthropologist might. Inspired by the common observation that ninety-nine percent of a good answer is a good question, Cultural Anthropology combines a question-centered pedagogy with the topics typically covered in an introductory course. It emphasizes up front what the discipline of anthropology knows and which issues are in debate, and how a cultural perspective is relevant to understanding social, political, and economic dynamics in the contemporary world. Cultural Anthropology also represents an effort to close the gap between the realities of the discipline today and traditional views that are taught at the introductory level by bringing classic anthropological examples, cases, and analyses to bear on contemporary questions.

Why Humans Have Cultures

Author: Michael Carrithers
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0192192272
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Medical

Why Humans Have Cultures examines three basic questions: what unity underlies human cultural diversity? What are the origins of that diversity? How can we understand it? The author argues that it is the ways in which people interact--rather than technological advances--that have been ofcrucial importance in human history. In this thought-provoking book, Carrithers draws on ancient and contemporary examples to show how this perspective forms a solid foundation for the study of culture, society, and history.

Asking Questions about Cultural Anthropology

Author: Robert Louis Welsch
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 019087807X
Release Date: 2018-08-31
Genre: Ethnology

Unlike textbooks that emphasize the memorization of facts, Asking Questions About Cultural Anthropology: A Concise Introduction, Second Edition, teaches students how to think anthropologically, helping them view cultural issues as an anthropologist might. This approach demonstrates how anthropological thinking can be used as a tool for deciphering everyday experiences. The book covers the essential concepts, terms, and history of cultural anthropology, introducing students to the widely accepted fundamentals and providing a foundation that can be enriched by the use of ethnographies, a reader, articles, lectures, field-based activities, and other kinds of supplements. It balances concise coverage of essential content with a commitment to an active, learner-centered pedagogy.

Coevolution

Author: William H. Durham
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804721564
Release Date: 1991
Genre: Social Science

Charles Darwin's "On the Origins of Species" had two principal goals: to show that species had not been separately created and to show that natural selection had been the main force behind their proliferation and descent from common ancestors. In "Coevolution," the author proposes a powerful new theory of cultural evolution--that is, of the descent with modification of the shared conceptual systems we call "cultures"--that is parallel in many ways to Darwin's theory of organic evolution. The author suggests that a process of cultural selection, or preservation by preference, driven chiefly by choice or imposition depending on the circumstances, has been the main but not exclusive force of cultural change. He shows that this process gives rise to five major patterns or "modes" in which cultural change is at odds with genetic change. Each of the five modes is discussed in some detail and its existence confirmed through one or more case studies chosen for their heuristic value, the robustness of their data, and their broader implications. But "Coevolution" predicts not simply the existence of the five modes of gene-culture relations; it also predicts their relative importance in the ongoing dynamics of cultural change in particular cases. The case studies themselves are lucid and innovative reexaminations of an array of oft-pondered anthropological topics--plural marriage, sickle-cell anemia, basic color terms, adult lactose absorption, incest taboos, headhunting, and cannibalism. In a general case, the author's goal is to demonstrate that an evolutionary analysis of both genes and culture has much to contribute to our understanding of human diversity, particularly behavioral diversity, and thus to the resolution of age-old questions about nature and nurture, genes and culture.

Wired for Culture Origins of the Human Social Mind

Author: Mark Pagel
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393065879
Release Date: 2012-02-27
Genre: Science

An evolutionary biologist explores the concept of culture and how it influenced our collective human behaviors from the beginning of evolution through modern times and offers new insights on how art, morality and altruism and self-interest define being human. 20,000 first printing.

Through the Lens of Anthropology

Author: Robert J. Muckle
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442608665
Release Date: 2015-11-06
Genre: Social Science

Through the Lens of Anthropology is a concise but comprehensive introductory textbook that uses the twin themes of food and sustainability to illustrate the connected nature of anthropology's four major subfields: archaeology, and biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology. By viewing the world through the lens of anthropology, students will learn not only about anthropological methods, theories, and ethics, but also the ways in which anthropology is relevant to their everyday lives and embedded in the culture that surrounds them. Beautifully illustrated throughout, with over 150 full-color images, figures, feature boxes, and maps, this is an anthropology text with a fresh perspective, a lively narrative, and plenty of popular topics that are sure to engage readers. A strong pedagogical framework structures the book: each chapter features learning objectives, glossary terms, and chapter summaries, as well as review and discussion questions which guide students' analysis of the topics, themes, and issues raised in the text. This book is interesting to read, manageable to teach, and succeeds at igniting interest in anthropology as a discipline.

Chimpanzee Material Culture

Author: William Clement McGrew
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521423716
Release Date: 1992-10-22
Genre: Psychology

The implications of tool-use behaviour in chimpanzees for reconstructing the evolutionary origins of human culture are discussed in this book.

Race Monogamy and Other Lies They Told You

Author: Agustín Fuentes
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520951679
Release Date: 2012-06-12
Genre: Social Science

There are three major myths of human nature: humans are divided into biological races; humans are naturally aggressive; men and women are truly different in behavior, desires, and wiring. In an engaging and wide-ranging narrative Agustín Fuentes counters these pervasive and pernicious myths about human behavior. Tackling misconceptions about what race, aggression, and sex really mean for humans, Fuentes incorporates an accessible understanding of culture, genetics, and evolution requiring us to dispose of notions of "nature or nurture." Presenting scientific evidence from diverse fields, including anthropology, biology, and psychology, Fuentes devises a myth-busting toolkit to dismantle persistent fallacies about the validity of biological races, the innateness of aggression and violence, and the nature of monogamy and differences between the sexes. A final chapter plus an appendix provide a set of take-home points on how readers can myth-bust on their own. Accessible, compelling, and original, this book is a rich and nuanced account of how nature, culture, experience, and choice interact to influence human behavior.

Our Origins

Author: Clark Spencer Larsen
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393921434
Release Date: 2014-02-01
Genre: Social Science

The Third Edition of this best-selling text now includes an update to the evolutionary primate taxonomy and even more tools to help students grasp the major concepts in physical anthropology—including new, photorealistic art.

Cultural Evolution

Author: Alex Mesoudi
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226520452
Release Date: 2011-07-30
Genre: Political Science

Charles Darwin changed the course of scientific thinking by showing how evolution accounts for the stunning diversity and biological complexity of life on earth. Recently, there has also been increased interest in the social sciences in how Darwinian theory can explain human culture. Covering a wide range of topics, including fads, public policy, the spread of religion, and herd behavior in markets, Alex Mesoudi shows that human culture is itself an evolutionary process that exhibits the key Darwinian mechanisms of variation, competition, and inheritance. This cross-disciplinary volume focuses on the ways cultural phenomena can be studied scientifically—from theoretical modeling to lab experiments, archaeological fieldwork to ethnographic studies—and shows how apparently disparate methods can complement one another to the mutual benefit of the various social science disciplines. Along the way, the book reveals how new insights arise from looking at culture from an evolutionary angle. Cultural Evolution provides a thought-provoking argument that Darwinian evolutionary theory can both unify different branches of inquiry and enhance understanding of human behavior.

The Secret of Our Success

Author: Joseph Henrich
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400873296
Release Date: 2015-10-27
Genre: Science

Humans are a puzzling species. On the one hand, we struggle to survive on our own in the wild, often failing to overcome even basic challenges, like obtaining food, building shelters, or avoiding predators. On the other hand, human groups have produced ingenious technologies, sophisticated languages, and complex institutions that have permitted us to successfully expand into a vast range of diverse environments. What has enabled us to dominate the globe, more than any other species, while remaining virtually helpless as lone individuals? This book shows that the secret of our success lies not in our innate intelligence, but in our collective brains—on the ability of human groups to socially interconnect and learn from one another over generations. Drawing insights from lost European explorers, clever chimpanzees, mobile hunter-gatherers, neuroscientific findings, ancient bones, and the human genome, Joseph Henrich demonstrates how our collective brains have propelled our species' genetic evolution and shaped our biology. Our early capacities for learning from others produced many cultural innovations, such as fire, cooking, water containers, plant knowledge, and projectile weapons, which in turn drove the expansion of our brains and altered our physiology, anatomy, and psychology in crucial ways. Later on, some collective brains generated and recombined powerful concepts, such as the lever, wheel, screw, and writing, while also creating the institutions that continue to alter our motivations and perceptions. Henrich shows how our genetics and biology are inextricably interwoven with cultural evolution, and how culture-gene interactions launched our species on an extraordinary evolutionary trajectory. Tracking clues from our ancient past to the present, The Secret of Our Success explores how the evolution of both our cultural and social natures produce a collective intelligence that explains both our species' immense success and the origins of human uniqueness.

Ritual and Religion in the Making of Humanity

Author: Roy A. Rappaport
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521296900
Release Date: 1999-03-25
Genre: Religion

Roy Rappaport argues that religion is central to the continuing evolution of life, although it has been been displaced from its original position of intellectual authority by the rise of modern science. His book, which could be construed as in some degree religious as well as about religion, insists that religion can and must be reconciled with science. Combining adaptive and cognitive approaches to the study of humankind, he mounts a comprehensive analysis of religion's evolutionary significance, seeing it as co-extensive with the invention of language and hence of culture as we know it. At the same time he assembles the fullest study yet of religion's main component, ritual, which constructs the conceptions which we take to be religious and has been central in the making of humanity's adaptation. The text amounts to a manual for effective ritual, illustrated by examples drawn from anthropology, history, philosophy, comparative religion, and elsewhere.

The Dawn of Human Culture

Author: Richard G. Klein
Publisher: Wiley
ISBN: 0471252522
Release Date: 2002-03-22
Genre: Social Science

A bold new theory on what sparked the "big bang" of human culture The abrupt emergence of human culture over a stunningly short period continues to be one of the great enigmas of human evolution. This compelling book introduces a bold new theory on this unsolved mystery. Author Richard Klein reexamines the archaeological evidence and brings in new discoveries in the study of the human brain. These studies detail the changes that enabled humans to think and behave in far more sophisticated ways than before, resulting in the incredibly rapid evolution of new skills. Richard Klein has been described as "the premier anthropologist in the country today" by Evolutionary Anthropology. Here, he and coauthor Blake Edgar shed new light on the full story of a truly fascinating period of evolution. Richard G. Klein, PhD (Palo Alto, CA), is a Professor of Anthropology at Stanford University. He is the author of the definitive academic book on the subject of the origins of human culture, The Human Career. Blake Edgar (San Francisco, CA) is the coauthor of the very successful From Lucy to Language, with Dr. Donald Johanson. He has written extensively for Discover, GEO, and numerous other magazines.

Anthropology

Author: Conrad Phillip Kottak
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages
ISBN: 0073137472
Release Date: 2005-04-21
Genre: Social Science

The new edition of Kottak's best selling text continues to offer a holistic introduction to anthropology that approaches the course from a four-field perspective. To emphasize anthropology's integrated and comparative nature, "Bringing It All Together" essays show how anthropology's sub-fields and dimensions combine to interpret and explain a common topic. Another distinctive feature, "Understanding Ourselves," illustrates the relevance of anthropological facts and theories to students' everyday lives. In addition, every new copy of the eleventh edition is packaged free with a new student CD-ROM as well as PowerWeb!