Archaeology of the Central Mississippi Valley

Author: Dan F. Morse
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9781483260969
Release Date: 2014-05-10
Genre: History

Archaeology of the Central Mississippi Valley describes an archeological reconstruction of the preceding 11,000 years of an extraordinarily rich environment centered within the largest river system north of the Amazon. This book focuses on the lowlands of the Mississippi Valley from just north of the Ohio River to the mouth of the Arkansas River. Organized into 13 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the territory between the Ohio and Arkansas rivers. This text then attempts to humanize the archeological interpretations by reference to social organization, settlement system, economy, religion, and politics. Other chapters focus on understanding the nature of change through time in the Central Mississippi Valley. This book discusses as well the difference between an old braided stream surface and the younger meander belt system. The final chapter deals with the investigation of prehistoric Indian remains. This book is a valuable resource for archeologists, zoologists, and scientific hobbyists.

Changing Perspectives on the Archaeology of the Central Mississippi Valley

Author: Society for American Archaeology. Meeting
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817309091
Release Date: 1998-03-25
Genre: History

Fourteen experts examine the current state of Central Valley prehistoric research and provide an important touchstone for future archaeological study of the region. The Mississippi Valley region has long played a critical role in the development of American archaeology and continues to be widely known for the major research of the early 1950s. To bring the archaeological record up to date, fourteen Central Valley experts address diverse topics including the distribution of artifacts across the landscape, internal configurations of large fortified settlements, human-bone chemistry, and ceramic technology. The authors demonstrate that much is to be learned from the rich and varied archaeological record of the region and that the methods and techniques used to study the record have changed dramatically over the past half century. Operating at the cutting edge of current research strategies, these archaeologists provide a fresh look at old problems in central Mississippi Valley research.

Prehistory of the Central Mississippi Valley

Author: Charles H. McNutt
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817308070
Release Date: 1996-05-30
Genre: History

The Central Mississippi Valley, defined as the region along the Mississippi River from where the Ohio River joins in the north to its confluence with the Arkansas River in the south, lies between the two most important archaeological areas of the Southeast: American Bottom/Cahokia and the Lower Yazoo Basin. The valley has been influenced by these major centers and has a complex history of its own. Contributions from experts throughout the region present current, if sometimes conflicting, views of the regional cultural sequences supported by data from recent surveys and excavations, as well as radiocarbon and chronometric determinations. By examining this new information and reevaluating earlier interpretations of local archaeological sequences, this volume provides a comprehensive overview of the valley and defines future research goals.

Twelve Millennia

Author: James L Theler
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 9781587294396
Release Date: 2005-04-01
Genre: History

The people of Taquile Island on the Peruvian side of beautiful Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable lake in the Americas, are renowned for the hand-woven textiles that they both wear and sell to outsiders. One thousand seven hundred Quechua-speaking peasant farmers, who depend on potatoes and the fish from the lake, host the forty thousand tourists who visit their island each year. Yet only twenty-five years ago, few tourists had even heard of Taquile. In Weaving a Future: Tourism, Cloth, and Culture on an Andean Island, Elayne Zorn documents the remarkable transformation of the isolated rocky island into a community-controlled enterprise that now provides a model for indigenous communities worldwide. Over the course of three decades and nearly two years living on Taquile Island, Zorn, who is trained in both the arts and anthropology, learned to weave from Taquilean women. She also learned how gender structures both the traditional lifestyles and the changes that tourism and transnationalism have brought. In her comprehensive and accessible study, she reveals how Taquileans used their isolation, landownership, and communal organizations to negotiate the pitfalls of globalization and modernization and even to benefit from tourism. This multi-sited ethnography set in Peru, Washington, D.C., and New York City shows why and how cloth remains central to Andean society and how the marketing of textiles provided the experience and money for Taquilean initiatives in controlling tourism. The first book about tourism in South America that centers on traditional arts as well as community control, Weaving a Future will be of great interest to anthropologists and scholars and practitioners of tourism, grassroots development, and the fiber arts.

Mississippian Community Organization

Author: Michael J. O'Brien
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780306471964
Release Date: 2006-04-11
Genre: Social Science

The Powers Phase Project was a multiyear archaeological program undertaken in southeastern Missouri by the University of Michigan in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The project focused on the occupation of a large Pleistocene-age terrace in the Little Black River Lowland—a large expanse of lowlying land just east of the Ozark Highland—between roughly A. D. 1250 and A. D. 1400. The largest site in the region is Powers Fort—a palisaded mound center that - ceived archaeological attention as early as the late nineteenth century. Archa- logical surveys conducted south of Powers Fort in the 1960s revealed the pr- ence of numerous smaller sites of varying size that contained artifact assemblages similar to those from the larger center. Collectively the settlement aggregation became known as the Powers phase. Test excavations indicated that at least some of the smaller sites contained burned structures and that the burning had sealed household items on the floors below the collapsed architectural e- ments. Thus there appeared to be an opportunity to examine a late prehistoric settlement system to a degree not possible previously. Not only could the s- tial relation of communities in the system be ascertained, but the fact that str- tures within the communities had burned appeared to provide a unique opp- tunity to examine such things as differences in household items between and among structures and where various activities had occurred within a house. With these ideas in mind, James B. Griffin and James E.

Applying Evolutionary Archaeology

Author: Michael J. O'Brien
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780306474682
Release Date: 2007-05-08
Genre: Social Science

Anthropology, and by extension archaeology, has had a long-standing interest in evolution in one or several of its various guises. Pick up any lengthy treatise on humankind written in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the chances are good that the word evolution will appear somewhere in the text. If for some reason the word itself is absent, the odds are excellent that at least the concept of change over time will have a central role in the discussion. After one of the preeminent (and often vilified) social scientists of the nineteenth century, Herbert Spencer, popularized the term in the 1850s, evolution became more or less a household word, usually being used synonymously with change, albeit change over extended periods of time. Later, through the writings of Edward Burnett Tylor, Lewis Henry Morgan, and others, the notion of evolution as it applies to stages of social and political development assumed a prominent position in anthropological disc- sions. To those with only a passing knowledge of American anthropology, it often appears that evolutionism in the early twentieth century went into a decline at the hands of Franz Boas and those of similar outlook, often termed particularists. However, it was not evolutionism that was under attack but rather comparativism— an approach that used the ethnographic present as a key to understanding how and why past peoples lived the way they did (Boas 1896).

Between Contacts and Colonies

Author: Cameron B. Wesson
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817311674
Release Date: 2002-10-23
Genre: Social Science

Between Contacts and Colonies reveals how the knowledgeable use of historical documents, innovative archaeological research, and emerging theory in anthropology can be integrated to arrive at a better understanding of this crucial period. It will be valuable for scholars and students of archaeology and anthropology, cultural historians, and academic librarians.

The Woodland Southeast

Author: David G. Anderson
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817311377
Release Date: 2002
Genre: History

This collection presents, for the first time, a much-needed synthesis of the major research themes and findings that characterize the Woodland Period in the southeastern United States. The Woodland Period (ca. 1200 B.C. to A.D. 1000) has been the subject of a great deal of archaeological research over the past 25 years. Researchers have learned that in this approximately 2000-year era the peoples of the Southeast experienced increasing sedentism, population growth, and organizational complexity. At the beginning of the period, people are assumed to have been living in small groups, loosely bound by collective burial rituals. But by the first millennium A.D., some parts of the region had densely packed civic ceremonial centers ruled by hereditary elites. Maize was now the primary food crop. Perhaps most importantly, the ancient animal-focused and hunting-based religion and cosmology were being replaced by solar and warfare iconography, consistent with societies dependent on agriculture, and whose elites were increasingly in competition with one another. This volume synthesizes the research on what happened during this era and how these changes came about while analyzing the period's archaeological record. In gathering the latest research available on the Woodland Period, the editors have included contributions from the full range of specialists working in the field, highlighted major themes, and directed readers to the proper primary sources. Of interest to archaeologists and anthropologists, both professional and amateur, this will be a valuable reference work essential to understanding the Woodland Period in the Southeast.

Time s River

Author: Janet Rafferty
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817354893
Release Date: 2008-07-21
Genre: History

An archaeologically rich region, in advance of impending disturbance

Arkansas

Author: Jeannie M. Whayne
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1557287244
Release Date: 2002
Genre: History

Four distinguished scholars, each focusing on a particular era, track the tensions, negotiations, and interactions among the different groups of people who have counted Arkansas as home. George Sabo III discusses Native American prehistory and the shocks of climate change and European arrival. He explores how surviving native groups carried forward economic and docial institutions, which in turn proved crucial to early colonists. Morris S. Arnold examines the native communities and the roles of minority groups and women in the development of law, government, and religion; the production of goods; and market economies. Jeannie M. Whayne shows how these multicultural relationships unfolded during hte subsequent era of American settlement. But mutuality ended when white settlers transplanted plantation agriculture and slavery to formerly native lands. Thomas DeBlack shows that the plantation society, while prosperous, also brought the state into the Civil War. He analyzes banking fiascoes, the state's reputation for violence, the mixed blessings of statehood, and the war itself. Whayne returns to discuss different groups' access to the political process; prostwar economic issues, including women's work; and the interrelated problems of industrialization, education, and race relations. The Civil Rights Acts of the 1960s, transformed political and social landscapes, but vestiges of the old attitudes and prejudices remain in place.

Common Fields

Author: Andrew Hurley
Publisher: Missouri History Museum
ISBN: 1883982154
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Science

In Common Fields, environmental historian Andrew Hurley has gathered thirteen original essays to tell a compelling story of one city's history. It is a story built on the never-ending tension between urban growth and environmental sustainability - a tension that defines the fate not just of St. Louis, but of cities around the world. In these pages, geographers, archaeologists, and historians come together to consider the enduring ties between a city's diverse residents and the physical environment on which their well-being depends.

Das Gottesgrab

Author: Will Adams
Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 9783644414013
Release Date: 2009-12-14
Genre: Fiction

Das Grab eines Gottes. Ein unermesslicher Schatz. Ein Geheimnis, das die Welt erschüttern könnte. Seit Jahren verfolgt der junge Archäologe Daniel Knox nur ein Ziel: Er will die sagenumwobene letzte Ruhestätte Alexanders des Großen finden. Da wird mitten in Alexandria eine rätselhafte Gruft freigelegt. Handelt es sich bei den zweiunddreißig toten Kriegern um die Elitetruppe des Welteroberers? Weisen sie den Weg zu seinem Grab und damit zum prächtigsten Schatz der antiken Welt? Gemeinsam mit der französischen Skryptologin Gaille begibt sich Knox auf eine gefährliche Spurensuche. Denn der Fundort lockt nicht nur skrupellose Wissenschaftler und geldgierige Plünderer: Das Grab birgt auch ein Geheimnis, das einen Völkerkrieg auslösen könnte, wenn es in die falschen Hände gerät. Und so wird Knox schon bald von alten und neuen Widersachern gejagt, die nicht nur nach dem Schatz, sondern auch nach seinem Leben trachten ...

Cat Monsters and Head Pots

Author: Michael John O'Brien
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105009774857
Release Date: 1994
Genre: History

Destined to become a classic in North American archaeology, Cat Monsters and Head Pots is a groundbreaking account of the late-period archaeology of one small but archaeologically important region of the central Mississippi River valley - an area bordering Pemiscot Bayou in modern Pemiscot County, Missouri. The sites from this period - the late Mississippian period, A.D. 1300-1540 - have been a lure for decades, primarily because of the exquisite pottery and Spanish artifacts that they produce. During the 1950s and early 1960s, the University of Missouri mostly through the efforts of the late Carl Chapman, undertook a series of excavations in Pemiscot County. This work preceded considerable site destruction through land leveling and road construction, so what was recovered is often all that remains of the vast quantities of materials once preserved in the sites. Cat Monsters and Head Pots, based on the notes and photographs from the excavations, as well as on public and private collections of artifacts excavated over the years, fills a tremendous void in the archaeological history of the central Mississippi Valley. Presented for the first time are site maps showing exactly what areas were excavated and what was recovered. Vessel photographs are included to give the reader an accurate picture of the range of pottery recovered from different sites. Reconstructing the environment of southeast Missouri during the time in question, O'Brien argues that this knowledge is crucial to an understanding of how prehistoric peoples used the region and how they adapted to a cypress swamp that was almost impenetrable until the land was drained in the late nineteenth century. Because of the paucity ofreported data from sites in this important locale, many archaeological myths have grown up about the way things were along Pemiscot Bayou 600 years ago. However, thanks to O'Brien's important work, those fictional tales can now be weighed against all the available evidence. Professional and amateur archaeologists alike will laud this exciting and extremely valuable new resource.