Chicago 68

Author: David Farber
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226237990
Release Date: 1994-08-17
Genre: Political Science

Entertaining and scrupulously researched, Chicago '68 reconstructs the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago—an epochal moment in American cultural and political history. By drawing on a wide range of sources, Farber tells and retells the story of the protests in three different voices, from the perspectives of the major protagonists—the Yippies, the National Mobilization to End the War, and Mayor Richard J. Daley and his police. He brilliantly recreates all the excitement and drama, the violently charged action and language of this period of crisis, giving life to the whole set of cultural experiences we call "the sixties." "Chicago '68 was a watershed summer. Chicago '68 is a watershed book. Farber succeeds in presenting a sensitive, fairminded composite portrait that is at once a model of fine narrative history and an example of how one can walk the intellectual tightrope between 'reporting one's findings' and offering judgements about them."—Peter I. Rose, Contemporary Sociology

Chicago 68

Author: David Farber
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226238008
Release Date: 1988-04-25
Genre: History

Chronicles the politics, protests, and violence of the sixties that culminated in the bloody confrontation between police and protesters on the Chicago streets during the 1968 Democratic National Convention

Chicago 68

Author: David Farber
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226238016
Release Date: 1994-10-17
Genre: Political Science

Entertaining and scrupulously researched, Chicago '68 reconstructs the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago—an epochal moment in American cultural and political history. By drawing on a wide range of sources, Farber tells and retells the story of the protests in three different voices, from the perspectives of the major protagonists—the Yippies, the National Mobilization to End the War, and Mayor Richard J. Daley and his police. He brilliantly recreates all the excitement and drama, the violently charged action and language of this period of crisis, giving life to the whole set of cultural experiences we call "the sixties." "Chicago '68 was a watershed summer. Chicago '68 is a watershed book. Farber succeeds in presenting a sensitive, fairminded composite portrait that is at once a model of fine narrative history and an example of how one can walk the intellectual tightrope between 'reporting one's findings' and offering judgements about them."—Peter I. Rose, Contemporary Sociology

Battleground Chicago

Author: Frank Kusch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226465036
Release Date: 2008-05-01
Genre: History

The 1968 Democratic Convention, best known for police brutality against demonstrators, has been relegated to a dark place in American historical memory. Battleground Chicago ventures beyond the stereotypical image of rioting protestors and violent cops to reevaluate exactly how—and why—the police attacked antiwar activists at the convention. Working from interviews with eighty former Chicago police officers who were on the scene, Frank Kusch uncovers the other side of the story of ’68, deepening our understanding of a turbulent decade. “Frank Kusch’s compelling account of the clash between Mayor Richard Daley’s men in blue and anti-war rebels reveals why the 1960s was such a painful era for many Americans. . . . to his great credit, [Kusch] allows ‘the pigs’ to speak up for themselves.”—Michael Kazin “Kusch’s history of white Chicago policemen and the 1968 Democratic National Convention is a solid addition to a growing literature on the cultural sensibility and political perspective of the conservative white working class in the last third of the twentieth century.”—David Farber, Journal of American History

No One Was Killed

Author: John Schultz
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226740782
Release Date: 2009-04-15
Genre: History

While other writers contemplated the events of the 1968 Chicago riots from the safety of their hotel rooms, John Schultz was in the city streets, being threatened by police, choking on tear gas, and listening to all the rage, fear, and confusion around him. The result, No One Was Killed, is his account of the contradictions and chaos of convention week, the adrenalin, the sense of drama and history, and how the mainstream press was getting it all wrong. "A more valuable factual record of events than the city’s white paper, the Walker Report, and Theodore B. White’s Making of a President combined."—Book Week "As a reporter making distinctions between Yippie, hippie, New Leftist, McCarthyite, police, and National Guard, Schultz is perceptive; he excels in describing such diverse personalities as Julian Bond and Eugene McCarthy."—Library Journal "High on my short list of true, lasting, inspired evocations of those whacked-out days when the country was fighting a phantasmagorical war (with real corpses), and police under orders were beating up demonstrators who looked at them funny."—Todd Gitlin, from the foreword

May 68 and Its Afterlives

Author: Kristin Ross
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226728005
Release Date: 2008-11-26
Genre: History

During May 1968, students and workers in France united in the biggest strike and the largest mass movement in French history. Protesting capitalism, American imperialism, and Gaullism, 9 million people from all walks of life, from shipbuilders to department store clerks, stopped working. The nation was paralyzed—no sector of the workplace was untouched. Yet, just thirty years later, the mainstream image of May '68 in France has become that of a mellow youth revolt, a cultural transformation stripped of its violence and profound sociopolitical implications. Kristin Ross shows how the current official memory of May '68 came to serve a political agenda antithetical to the movement's aspirations. She examines the roles played by sociologists, repentant ex-student leaders, and the mainstream media in giving what was a political event a predominantly cultural and ethical meaning. Recovering the political language of May '68 through the tracts, pamphlets, and documentary film footage of the era, Ross reveals how the original movement, concerned above all with the question of equality, gained a new and counterfeit history, one that erased police violence and the deaths of participants, removed workers from the picture, and eliminated all traces of anti-Americanism, anti-imperialism, and the influences of Algeria and Vietnam. May '68 and Its Afterlives is especially timely given the rise of a new mass political movement opposing global capitalism, from labor strikes and anti-McDonald's protests in France to the demonstrations against the World Trade Organization in Seattle.

The Sixty Eight Rooms

Author: Marianne Malone
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 9780375893247
Release Date: 2010-02-23
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Almost everybody who has grown up in Chicago knows about the Thorne Rooms. Housed in the Children’s Galleries of the Chicago Art Institute, they are a collection of 68 exquisitely crafted miniature rooms made in the 1930s by Mrs. James Ward Thorne. Each of the 68 rooms is designed in the style of a different historic period, and every detail is perfect, from the knobs on the doors to the candles in the candlesticks. Some might even say, the rooms are magic. Imagine—what if you discovered a key that allowed you to shrink so that you were small enough to sneak inside and explore the rooms’ secrets? What if you discovered that others had done so before you? And that someone had left something important behind? Fans of Chasing Vermeer, The Doll People, and From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler will be swept up in the magic of this exciting art adventure! From the Hardcover edition.

Law and Order

Author: Michael W. Flamm
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231509725
Release Date: 2005-08-05
Genre: History

Law and Order offers a valuable new study of the political and social history of the 1960s. It presents a sophisticated account of how the issues of street crime and civil unrest enhanced the popularity of conservatives, eroded the credibility of liberals, and transformed the landscape of American politics. Ultimately, the legacy of law and order was a political world in which the grand ambitions of the Great Society gave way to grim expectations. In the mid-1960s, amid a pervasive sense that American society was coming apart at the seams, a new issue known as law and order emerged at the forefront of national politics. First introduced by Barry Goldwater in his ill-fated run for president in 1964, it eventually punished Lyndon Johnson and the Democrats and propelled Richard Nixon and the Republicans to the White House in 1968. In this thought-provoking study, Michael Flamm examines how conservatives successfully blamed liberals for the rapid rise in street crime and then skillfully used law and order to link the understandable fears of white voters to growing unease about changing moral values, the civil rights movement, urban disorder, and antiwar protests. Flamm documents how conservatives constructed a persuasive message that argued that the civil rights movement had contributed to racial unrest and the Great Society had rewarded rather than punished the perpetrators of violence. The president should, conservatives also contended, promote respect for law and order and contempt for those who violated it, regardless of cause. Liberals, Flamm argues, were by contrast unable to craft a compelling message for anxious voters. Instead, liberals either ignored the crime crisis, claimed that law and order was a racist ruse, or maintained that social programs would solve the "root causes" of civil disorder, which by 1968 seemed increasingly unlikely and contributed to a loss of faith in the ability of the government to do what it was above all sworn to do-protect personal security and private property.

1968

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 9780345455826
Release Date: 2005-01
Genre: History

Provides a detailed look at 1968, a pivotal year in the history of the twentieth century, exploring the turbulent events, politics, culture, economics, and social changes that marked a volatile year.

The Making of the President 1972

Author: Theodore H. White
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780062027115
Release Date: 2010-10-05
Genre: History

“[White] revolutionized the art of political reporting.” —William F. Buckley The Making of the President 1972 is the fourth book in Theodore H. White’s landmark series, a riveting account of the 1972 presidential campaign and Richard M. Nixon’s precedent-shattering landslide victory. White had made history with his groundbreaking narrative The Making of the President 1960, winning the Pulitzer Prize for revolutionizing the way that presidential campaigns were reported. Now, The Making of the President 1972—back in print, freshly repackaged, and with a new foreword by Cokie Roberts—joins Theodore Sorensen’s Kennedy, White’s The Making of the President 1960, 1964, and 1968, and other classics in the burgeoning Harper Perennial Political Classics series.

James Mabbe The Spanish Bawd

Author: James Mabbe
Publisher: MHRA
ISBN: 9781907322099
Release Date: 2013-10-01
Genre: Drama

Normal 0 false false false ES JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:0cm; mso-para-margin-left:49.6pt; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; text-indent:-49.6pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:ES;} After its first known edition in 1499, La Celestina immediately became an international bestseller. The tragicomic love affair of Calisto and Melibea—brought about by the old bawd Celestina and the squalid underworld over which she presides—conjures up a social landscape dominated by anomie and change. The moral ambiguity that emanates from its realistic dialogues and urban prose style also constitutes one of its most remarkable achievements. The purpose of this edition is to facilitate access to Mabbe’s translation in a modernized text. The introduction provides a succinct account of its Castilian origins and English reception as part of international networks of exchange. These networks included cultural agents engaged in the establishment of vernacular canons through the appropriation of alien literary capital. As they did so, these national traditions also sought to homogenize their respective linguistic communities into a commonwealth of speakers that could be used for the establishment of a comprehensive polity upon a common body of laws and social norms. As a forerunner of the picaresque—which also addresses the language and values that regulate the relations between self and society—The Spanish Bawd exposes the paradoxes of self-interest as the keystone for a life in common. José María Pérez Fernández is senior lecturer in English Literature and Cultural Translation at the University of Granada