Chicago Seven

Author: Abbie Hoffman
Publisher: Red & Black Pub
ISBN: 1934941352
Release Date: 2008
Genre: History

Part conspiracy trial, part political theater, the trial of seven activists who disrupted the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago, was an iconic event of the 60's. Here, from trial transcripts, are the testimony of Abbie Hoffman, Rennie Davis, Bobby Seale, and others.

Direct Action

Author: James Tracy
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226811301
Release Date: 1996-09-15
Genre: History

Direct Action tells the story of how a small group of "radical pacifists"—nonviolent activists such as David Dellinger, Staughton Lynd, A.J. Muste, and Bayard Rustin—played a major role in the rebirth of American radicalism and social protest in the 1950s and 1960s. Coming together in the camps and prisons where conscientious objectors were placed during World War II, radical pacifists developed an experimental protest style that emphasized media-savvy, symbolic confrontation with institutions deemed oppressive. Due to their tactical commitment to nonviolent direct action, they became the principal interpreters of Gandhism on the American Left, and indelibly stamped postwar America with their methods and ethos. Genealogies of the Civil Rights, antiwar, and antinuclear movements in this period are incomplete without understanding the history of radical pacifism. Taking us through the Vietnam war protests, this detailed treatment of radical pacifism reveals the strengths and limitations of American individualism in the modern era.

The Chicago Seven Political Protest Trial

Author: Karen Alonso
Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 0766017648
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Discusses the trial of Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, Tom Hayden, Rennie Davis, David Dellinger, John Froines, and Lee Weiner for activities during the Democratic National Convention of 1968.

Culture Wars

Author: Roger Chapman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317473503
Release Date: 2015-03-17
Genre: Business & Economics

The term "culture wars" refers to the political and sociological polarisation that has characterised American society the past several decades. This new edition provides an enlightening and comprehensive A-to-Z ready reference, now with supporting primary documents, on major topics of contemporary importance for students, teachers, and the general reader. It aims to promote understanding and clarification on pertinent topics that too often are not adequately explained or discussed in a balanced context. With approximately 640 entries plus more than 120 primary documents supporting both sides of key issues, this is a unique and defining work, indispensable to informed discussions of the most timely and critical issues facing America today.

The Chicago Conspiracy Trial

Author: John Schultz
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226741147
Release Date: 2009-04-15
Genre: History

In 1969, the Chicago Seven were charged with intent to "incite, organize, promote, and encourage" antiwar riots during the Democratic National Convention. The Chicago Conspiracy Trial is an electrifying account of the months-long trial that commanded the attention of a divided nation. John Schultz, on assignment for The Evergreen Review, witnessed the whole trial, from the jury selection to the aftermath of the verdict. In his vivid account, Schultz exposes the raw emotions and judicial corruption that came to define one of the most significant legal events in American history. "This work, aside from being a profound study of fear, is investigative journalism in its highest sense."—Studs Terkel "[Schultz] puts words together with a clarity of sense and syntax that is almost physically engaging. . . . A probe into the American conscience."—David Graber, Los Angeles Times "A masterful recapitulation of these anomalous events. . . . All politically literate Americans should read [it]."—Kirkus Reviews

The Right to Free Speech

Author: Claudia Isler
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group
ISBN: 0823932346
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Explores the history of free speech, focusing on the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment and why they are important.

The New Left Revisited

Author: John Campbell McMillian
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 1592137970
Release Date: 2008
Genre: History

Starting with the premise that it is possible to say something significantly new about the 1960s and the New Left, the contributors to this volume trace the social roots, the various paths, and the legacies of the movement that set out to change America. As members of a younger generation of scholars, none of them (apart from Paul Buhle) has first-hand knowledge of the era. Their perspective as non-participants enables them to offer fresh interpretations of the regional and ideological differences that have been obscured in the standard histories and memoirs of the period. Reflecting the diversity of goals, the clashes of opinions, and the tumult of the time, these essays will engage seasoned scholars as well as students of the '60s.

B Sides Undercurrents and Overtones Peripheries to Popular in Music 1960 to the Present

Author: Professor George Plasketes
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781409493860
Release Date: 2013-01-28
Genre: Music

There are undercurrents and peripheral taste preferences that are a defining part of our individual and collective cultural experience. Music is no exception. George Plasketes adapts the iconic "A-side/B-side" dichotomy from the 45 r.p.m. for use as a unique conceptual, critical, historical, and cultural framework for exploring and threading together a variety of popular music and media texts. The profiles and perspectives focus on the peripheries; on texts which might be considered "B-sides"—overlooked, underappreciated, and unsung cases, creators, patterns and productions that have unassumingly, but significantly, marked popular culture, music and media during the past 40 years. The underappreciated yet enduring contributions of a variety of creative individuals in music, television and film are a centerpiece of this volume: actress Doris Day's son, Terry Melcher, a 1960s music producer whose imprint is on the surf, country blues, garage pop and most importantly the folk rock genre; Hans Fenger's kid chorus cover project, a musical variation of "outsider art" that became representative of the tribute wave that began in the 1990s and continues today; versatile guitarist virtuoso Ry Cooder's extensive film soundtrack work; World Music "missionary efforts" of American artists beyond Paul Simon's Graceland, including Neil Diamond's precursor with Tap Root Manuscript in the 1970s and the exotic adventures of Henry Kaiser and David Lindley in Madagascar and Norway—to name just a few examples. These B-sides represent undercurrents, but they resonate as overtones in the mainstream of music and culture, many as historical hinges. Collectively, these B-sides are an A-side antidote of outskirt observations, individual snapshots of artists, artifacts and rituals, genres and generations, producers and musical productions in television, film and video. They constitute an important connect-the-dots cultural chronicle with a multi-layered context—social, legal, historic, economic, technological, generational, aesthetic—for interpreting the interrelations between creators and institutions, the music market place, the production of culture and important connections between the peripheral and the popular.

Identity Unknown

Author: Donna Seaman
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 9781620407608
Release Date: 2017-02-14
Genre: Art

An award-winning critic rescues seven first-rate women artists from oblivion--their lives fascinating, their artwork a revelation. Who hasn't wondered where-aside from Georgia O'Keeffe and Frida Kahlo-all the women artists are? In many art books, they've been marginalized with cold efficiency, summarily dismissed in the captions of group photographs with the phrase "identity unknown" while each male is named. Donna Seaman brings to dazzling life seven of these forgotten artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era. These women fought to be treated the same as male artists, to be judged by their work, not their gender or appearance. In brilliant, compassionate prose, Seaman reveals what drove them, how they worked, and how they were perceived by others in a world where women were subjects-not makers-of art. Featuring stunning examples of the artists' work, Identity Unknown speaks to all women about their neglected place in history and the challenges they face to be taken as seriously as men no matter what their chosen field-and to all men interested in women's lives.