Chinese Medicine and Healing

Author: TJ Hinrichs
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674047372
Release Date: 2013
Genre: History

This illustrated history is a comprehensive introduction to Chinese healing practices across time and cultures. Global contributions from 58 scholars in archaeology, history, anthropology, religion, and medicine make this a vital resource for those working in East Asian or world history, medical history, anthropology, biomedicine, and healing arts.

The Yellow Emperor s Classic of Internal Medicine

Author: Linda L. Barnes
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520288263
Release Date: 2015-12-15
Genre: Health & Fitness

The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine has become a landmark in the history of Chinese civilization. Written in the form of a dialogue in which the emperor seeks information from his minister Ch’I-Po on questions of health and the art of healing, it is the oldest known document in Chinese medicine. Ilza Veith’s extensive introduction and monumental translation, first published in 1949, make available the historical and philosophical foundations of traditional practices that have seen a dynamic revival in China and throughout the West. A new foreword by Linda L. Barnes places the translation in its historic contexts, underlining its significance to the Western world’s understanding of Chinese medical practice.

Needles Herbs Gods and Ghosts

Author: Linda L. BARNES
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674020542
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: History

When did the West discover Chinese healing traditions? Most people might point to the "rediscovery" of Chinese acupuncture in the 1970s. In Needles, Herbs, Gods, and Ghosts, Linda Barnes leads us back, instead, to the thirteenth century to uncover the story of the West's earliest known encounters with Chinese understandings of illness and healing. A medical anthropologist with a degree in comparative religion, Barnes illuminates the way constructions of medicine, religion, race, and the body informed Westerners' understanding of the Chinese and their healing traditions.

Medicine

Author: DK
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781465458933
Release Date: 2016-10-11
Genre: Medical

Medicine tells the fascinating story of the discipline, from ancient times to the present day, charting developments in healing, diagnosis, surgery, and drugs in a vividly visual and accessible format. Follow the gory pitfalls and the miraculous breakthroughs of medical history from trepanning, bloodletting, and body snatching to the latest developments in IVF and gene therapy. Clear diagrams explain major diseases, such as cancer, and enhance understanding of human anatomy, surgical instruments, and the progression of treatment over the centuries, setting the great milestones of medical history in their wider social context. A complementary illustrated reference section profiles all the main body systems and organs and explains their relevance in terms of the advancement of medicine. A compelling blend of riveting stories, accessible information, and striking illustrations, Medicine shows and tells how medicine has evolved into the lifesaving discipline it is today.

Medicine in China

Author: Paul U. Unschuld
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520266131
Release Date: 2010-06
Genre: Medical

In the first comprehensive and analytical study of therapeutic concepts and practices in China, Paul Unschuld traced the history of documented health care from its earliest extant records to present developments. This edition is updated with a new preface which details the immense ideological intersections between Chinese and European medicines in the past 25 years.

The Making of Modern Chinese Medicine 1850 1960

Author: Bridie Andrews
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 9780774824354
Release Date: 2014-04-01
Genre: History

Medical care in nineteenth-century China was spectacularly pluralistic: herbalists, shamans, bone-setters, midwives, priests, and a few medical missionaries from the West all competed for patients. This book examines the dichotomy between "Western" and "Chinese" medicine, showing how it has been greatly exaggerated. As missionaries went to lengths to make their medicine more acceptable to Chinese patients, modernizers of Chinese medicine worked to become more "scientific" by eradicating superstition and creating modern institutions. Andrews challenges the supposed superiority of Western medicine in China while showing how "traditional" Chinese medicine was deliberately created in the image of a modern scientific practice.

Sources in the History of Medicine

Author: Robin Leslie Anderson
Publisher: Prentice Hall
ISBN: STANFORD:36105122847515
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Medical

For courses in the history of medicine. This reader gives students in a history of medicine class, or the general reading public, a broad selection of readings about the many ways that disease and trauma have affected human populations over time. It draws from both primary and secondary sources to give a dual perspective of a) what was written at the time of various events, and b) what modern scholars have been able to ascertain from historical evidence. It has a broad scope both in time and space, covering materials from earliest Man to contemporary bioethical problems, and contains materials from India, China, Latin America, and the Muslim worlds as well as Europe and the United States. Rather than simply looking at great medical discoveries, it is purposely focused on how trauma and disease have been daily companions of human existence. It fills a serious void in teaching materials in the history of medicine by taking a world perspective, using a combination of primary and secondary sources, covering a huge time span and putting emphasis on the problems created by medical progress, and most importantly, focusing on the effect that medical practices have had on ordinary people throughout history.

Chinese Medical Qigong

Author: Tianjun Liu
Publisher: Singing Dragon
ISBN: 9780857011497
Release Date: 2013-05-28
Genre: Body, Mind & Spirit

Based on the latest edition of the approved textbook on Medical Qigong used in Chinese universities, this authoritative paperback edition has been completely revised and edited to meet the needs of western practitioners. The editors emphasize the practice of Qigong, and this section of the book has been revised and expanded; a wide range of Qigong forms are presented, taking full account of the history, correct practice, and development of Qigong. The section on the clinical applications of Qigong in the treatment of a wide range of conditions, with the recommended Qigong forms for treatment, and relevant references to the ancient texts has been substantially revised, and focuses on conditions more common in the West. The book also presents the newest research on Medical Qigong, including groundbreaking new discoveries about the physiological and psychological mechanisms. Omitted from this paperback edition are the extensive excerpts from the ancient texts, and the detailed history, more appropriate for academic study. This is an unparalleled resource for practitioners of Qigong and Chinese medicine, as well as medical students and other healthcare professionals seeking a better understanding of the theory, practice and beneficial health applications of Medical Qigong.

Neither Donkey Nor Horse

Author: Sean Hsiang-lin Lei
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226169880
Release Date: 2014-09-09
Genre: History

Neither Donkey nor Horse tells the story of how Chinese medicine was transformed from the antithesis of modernity in the early twentieth century into a potent symbol of and vehicle for China’s exploration of its own modernity half a century later. Instead of viewing this transition as derivative of the political history of modern China, Sean Hsiang-lin Lei argues that China’s medical history had a life of its own, one that at times directly influenced the ideological struggle over the meaning of China’s modernity and the Chinese state. Far from being a remnant of China’s premodern past, Chinese medicine in the twentieth century coevolved with Western medicine and the Nationalist state, undergoing a profound transformation—institutionally, epistemologically, and materially—that resulted in the creation of a modern Chinese medicine. This new medicine was derided as “neither donkey nor horse” because it necessarily betrayed both of the parental traditions and therefore was doomed to fail. Yet this hybrid medicine survived, through self-innovation and negotiation, thus challenging the conception of modernity that rejected the possibility of productive crossbreeding between the modern and the traditional. By exploring the production of modern Chinese medicine and China’s modernity in tandem, Lei offers both a political history of medicine and a medical history of the Chinese state.

Chinese Magical Medicine

Author: Michel Strickmann
Publisher: LIT Verlag Münster
ISBN: 0804739404
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Religion

Possibly the most profound and far-reaching effects of Buddhism on Chinese culture occurred at the level of practice in religious rituals designed to cure people of disease, demonic possession, and bad luck. A basic concern with healing characterizes the entire gamut of religious expression in East Asia. By concentrating on the medieval development of Chinese therapeutic ritual, the author discovers the origins of many surviving rituals across the social and doctrinal frontiers of Buddhism and Taoism, including transmission to persons outside the Buddhist or Taoist fold. The author describes and translates many classical Chinese liturgies, analyzes their structure, and seeks out nonliturgical sources to shed further light on the politics involved in specific performances. Unlike the few previous studies of related rituals, this book combines a scholar's understanding of structure and goals of these rites with a healthy suspicion of the practitioners' claims to uniqueness.

Plants Health and Healing

Author: Elisabeth Hsu
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1845450604
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Nature

Plants have cultural histories, and their culturally known applications change through time and across contexts. The impact of individual plant species on human cultures has been profound, whether it is the coca and quinine from South America or tea and coffee from the Old World. This pattern is seen in all types of uses that humans make of plants, from trees used for construction, through species used for perfume through to food plants. However, it is medicinal plants that have attracted considerable attention recently, whether as a justification of plant conservation efforts or through the perception that direct use of medicinal plants may offer something that is not delivered by orthodox medicine. Nevertheless, surprisingly little research has been done on the interface of ethnobotany and medical anthropology. This volume makes an important contribution to filling this gap. Its two central aims are to demonstrate that plant knowledge is not paradigmatic positive knowledge but situational and arises in relationships, and to show that modern medicinal plant discovery can be viewed as the epitome of a long history of borrowing, stealing, and exchanging plants.