Church Courts Sex and Marriage in England 1570 1640

Author: Martin Ingram
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521386551
Release Date: 1990-03-29
Genre: History

This is an in-depth, richly documented study of the sex and marriage business in ecclesiastical courts of Elizabethan and early Stuart England. This study is based on records of the courts in Wiltshire, Cambridgeshire, Leicestershire and West Sussex in the period 1570-1640.

The Middling Sort and the Politics of Social Reformation

Author: Richard Dean Smith
Publisher: Peter Lang
ISBN: 082043972X
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Social Science

The interrelated demographic, economic, religious, and cultural transformations that England experienced in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries were most pronounced in larger towns in the south and east, such as Colchester in Essex. The effects produced by these changes led to an effort at social and sexual regulation by the town's more prosperous residents, in order to control and modify the negative impact on the local population, especially the poor. This book provides an in-depth portrait of an urban setting, discussing both wrongdoers themselves and the motivations of the craftsmen and tradesmen - the -middling sorts- - who enforced local standards of conduct."

Family and Kinship in England 1450 1800

Author: Will Coster
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317879732
Release Date: 2015-10-23
Genre: History

While historians have made the history of family life a key area of scholarly study, the diversity of methods, sources, areas of interest and conclusions this has produced, have made it one of the most difficult for readers to approach.Family & Kinship in England 1450-1800 guides the reader through the changing relationships that made up the nature of family life. It gives a clear introduction to many of the intriguing areas of interest that this field of history has opened up, including childhood, youth, marriage, sexuality and death. The book provides: An understanding of how the family has developed from the late medieval period to the beginnings of industrialisation. A synthesis of the varied work of other historians, which helps to understand the often disjointed or contradictory research into this area. A glossary of technical terms used by historians to describe the family in the past. Contemporary documents and illustrations, allowing readers to familiarise themselves with the business of understanding people in the past. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, Family & Kinship in England 1450-1800 stimulates interest in a fascinating topic and allows readers to pursue their own interests in the history of family life in the past.

Love Lust and License in Early Modern England

Author: Johanna Rickman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351921220
Release Date: 2016-12-05
Genre: History

Focusing on cases of extramarital sex, Johanna Rickman investigates fornication, adultery and bastard bearing among the English nobility during the Elizabethan and early Stuart period. Since members of the nobility were not generally brought before the ecclesiastical courts, which had jurisdiction over other citizens' sexual offences, Rickman's sources include collections of family papers (primarily letters), state papers, and literary texts (prescriptive manuals, love sonnets, satirical verse, and prose romances), as well as legal documents. Rickman explores how attitudes towards illicit sex varied greatly throughout the period of study, roughly 1560 - 1630. Whole some viewed it as a minor infraction, others, directed by a religious moral code, viewed it as a serious sin. seeks to illuminate the place of noblewomenin early modern aristocratic culture, both as historical subjects (considering personal circumstances) and as a social group (considering social position and status).She argues that two different gender ideals were in operation simultaneously: one primarily religious ideal, which lauded female silence, obedience, and chastity, and another, more secular ideal, which required noblewomen to be beautiful, witty, brave, and receptive to the games of courtly love.

Legalism

Author: Fernanda Pirie
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191025938
Release Date: 2014-07-31
Genre: Law

'Community' and 'justice' recur in anthropological, historical, and legal scholarship, yet as concepts they are notoriously slippery. Historians and lawyers look to anthropologists as 'community specialists', but anthropologists often avoid the concept through circumlocution: although much used (and abused) by historians, legal thinkers, and political philosophers, the term remains strikingly indeterminate and often morally overdetermined. 'Justice', meanwhile, is elusive, alternately invoked as the goal of contemporary political theorizing, and wrapped in obscure philosophical controversy. A conceptual knot emerges in much legal and political thought between law, justice, and community, but theories abound, without any agreement over concepts. The contributors to this volume use empirical case studies to unpick threads of this knot. Local codes from Anglo-Saxon England, north Africa, and medieval Armenia indicate disjunctions between community boundaries and the subjects of local rules and categories; processes of justice from early modern Europe to eastern Tibet suggest new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between law and justice; and practices of exile that recur throughout the world illustrate contingent formulations of community. In the first book in the series, Legalism: Anthropology and History, law was addressed through a focus on local legal categories as conceptual tools. Here this approach is extended to the ideas and ideals of justice and community. Rigorous cross-cultural comparison allows the contributors to avoid normative assumptions, while opening new avenues of inquiry for lawyers, anthropologists, and historians alike.

The Origins of Sex

Author: Faramerz Dabhoiwala
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199939398
Release Date: 2012-05-01
Genre: History

A man admits that, when drunk, he tried to have sex with an eighteen-year-old girl; she is arrested and denies they had intercourse, but finally begs God's forgiveness. Then she is publicly hanged alongside her attacker. These events took place in 1644, in Boston, where today they would be viewed with horror. How--and when--did such a complete transformation of our culture's attitudes toward sex occur? In The Origins of Sex, Faramerz Dabhoiwala provides a landmark history, one that will revolutionize our understanding of the origins of sexuality in modern Western culture. For millennia, sex had been strictly regulated by the Church, the state, and society, who vigorously and brutally attempted to punish any sex outside of marriage. But by 1800, everything had changed. Drawing on vast research--from canon law to court cases, from novels to pornography, not to mention the diaries and letters of people great and ordinary--Dabhoiwala shows how this dramatic change came about, tracing the interplay of intellectual trends, religious and cultural shifts, and politics and demographics. The Enlightenment led to the presumption that sex was a private matter; that morality could not be imposed; that men, not women, were the more lustful gender. Moreover, the rise of cities eroded community-based moral policing, and religious divisions undermined both church authority and fear of divine punishment. Sex became a central topic in poetry, drama, and fiction; diarists such as Samuel Pepys obsessed over it. In the 1700s, it became possible for a Church of Scotland leader to commend complete sexual liberty for both men and women. Arguing that the sexual revolution that really counted occurred long before the cultural movement of the 1960s, Dabhoiwala offers readers an engaging and wholly original look at the Western world's relationship to sex. Deeply researched and powerfully argued, The Origins of Sex is a major work of history.

Women s Worlds in Seventeenth Century England

Author: Patricia Crawford
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134730902
Release Date: 2005-06-20
Genre: History

Womens Worlds in England presents a unique collection of source materials on womens lives in sixteenth and seventeenth century England. The book introduces a wonderfully diverse group of women and a series of voices that have rarely been heard in history, Drawing on unpublished, archival materials, the book explores women's: * experiences of work, sex, marriage and motherhood * beliefs and spirituality * political activities * relationships * mental worlds. In a time when few women could write, this book reveals the multitude of ways in which their voices have left traces in the written record, and deepens our understanding of womens lives in the past.

Getting Along

Author: Dr Adam Morton
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781409482949
Release Date: 2013-07-28
Genre: History

Examining the impact of the English and European Reformations on social interaction and community harmony, this volume simultaneously highlights the tension and degree of accommodation amongst ordinary people when faced with religious and social upheaval. Building on previous literature which has characterised the progress of the Reformation as 'slow' and 'piecemeal', this volume furthers our understanding of the process of negotiation at the most fundamental social and political levels - in the family, the household, and the parish. The essays further research in the field of religious toleration and social interaction in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in both Britain and the wider European context. The contributors are amongst the leading researchers in the fields of religious toleration and denominational history, and their essays combine new archival research with current debates in the field. Additionally, the collection seeks to celebrate the career of Professor Bill Sheils, Head of the Department of History at the University of York, for his on-going contributions to historians' understanding of non-conformity (both Catholic and Protestant) in Reformation and post-Reformation England.

Family and Friends in Eighteenth Century England

Author: Naomi Tadmor
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139429892
Release Date: 2001-11-01
Genre: History

This 2001 book concerns the history of the family in eighteenth-century England. Naomi Tadmor provides an interpretation of concepts of household, family and kinship starting from her analysis of contemporary language (in the diaries of Thomas Turner; in conduct treatises by Samuel Richardson and Eliza Haywood; in three novels, Richardson's Pamela and Clarissa and Haywood's The History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless and a variety of other sources). Naomi Tadmor emphasises the importance of the household in constructing notions of the family in the eighteenth century. She uncovers a vibrant language of kinship which recasts our understanding of kinship ties in the period. She also shows how strong ties of 'friendship' formed vital social, economic and political networks among kin and non-kin. Family and Friends in Eighteenth-Century England makes a substantial contribution to eighteenth-century history, and will be of value to all historians and literary scholars of the period.

The Church of England in Industrialising Society

Author: Michael Francis Snape
Publisher: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843830140
Release Date: 2003
Genre: History

The Church of England in the 18th century is seen as failing its congregation in the industrialising areas; specific issues are set out.

Learning the Law

Author: Jonathan Bush
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9781852851842
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Law

The essays in this text deal with aspects of British legal learning. It traces the tradition of learning dating back to the Middle Ages and how the inns of court provided the equivalent of a legal university. The essays describe how before the middle of the 19th-century there was little formal provision of legal education in Britain and that law in the ancient universities was not intended to have practical value and entrance to the bar was not dependent upon written examination.

Bodies Sex and Desire from the Renaissance to the Present

Author: Kate Fisher
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9780230354128
Release Date: 2011-10-18
Genre: History

An examination of how bodies and sexualities have been constructed, categorised, represented, diagnosed, experienced and subverted from the fifteenth to the early twenty-first century. It draws attention to continuities in thinking about bodies and sex: concept may have changed, but hey nevertheless draw on older ideas and language.