Citizenship and National Identity

Author: David l. Miller
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745667935
Release Date: 2013-05-31
Genre: Political Science

A good political community is one whose citizens are actively engaged in deciding their common future together. Bound together by ties of national solidarity, they discover and implement principles of justice that all can share, and in doing so they respect the separate identities of minority groups within the community. In the essays collected in this book, David Miller shows that such an ideal is not only desirable, but feasible. He explains how active citizenship on the republican model differs from liberal citizenship, and why it serves disadvantaged groups better than currently fashionable forms of identity politics. By deliberating freely with one another, citizens can reach decisions on matters of public policy that are both rational and fair. He couples this with a robust defence of the principle of nationality, arguing that a shared national identity is necessary to motivate citizens to work together in the name of justice. Attempts to create transnational forms of citizenship, in Europe and elsewhere, are therefore misguided. He shows that the principle of nationality can accommodate the demands of minority nations, and does not lead to a secessionist free-for-all. And finally he demonstrates that national self-determination need not be achieved at the expense of global justice. This is a powerful statement from a leading political theorist that not only extends our understanding of citizenship, nationality and deliberative democracy, but engages with current political debates about identity politics, minority nationalisms and European integration.

Citizenship and national identity

Author: T. K. Oommen
Publisher: Sage Publications Pvt. Ltd
ISBN: UOM:39015041999619
Release Date: 1997-01-01
Genre: Political Science

Combining both Western and non-Western perspectives, Citizenship and National Identity deftly explores the major problems and issues involved in understanding the relationship between citizenship and national identity in a contemporary context. This volume of original essays provides an incisive analysis of the prevailing concepts of citizenship and nationality, which are becoming increasingly problematic in todayÆs world with its numerous polyethnic and multinational societies. Featuring a truly global perspective covering different continents, time periods, and countries at various stages of development, this volume also emphasizes the views of weaker and smaller groups. By delinking national identity from its anchorage in a nation-state and arguing against fusing ethnicity, nationality, and citizenship, the contributors look hopefully to the process of globalization that has resulted in the coexistence of peoples of different national/ethnic backgrounds in the same polity. Innovative, unconventional, and challenging, this interdisciplinary volume is aimed at accelerating the democratic process. Students and academics in the fields of sociology, political theory, social anthropology, ethnic studies, political sociology, and culture studies will want to read this timely collection of essays. Researchers and policymakers will likewise find the topics covered of current and empirical interest.

Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination

Author: Kathy-Ann Tan
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814341414
Release Date: 2015-12-07
Genre: Literary Criticism

Literature has always played a central role in creating and disseminating culturally specific notions of citizenship, nationhood, and belonging. In Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination, author Kathy-Ann Tan investigates metaphors, configurations, parameters, and articulations of U.S. and Canadian citizenship that are enacted, renegotiated, and revised in modern literary texts, particularly during periods of emergence and crisis. Tan brings together for the first time a selection of canonical and lesser-known U.S. and Canadian writings for critical consideration. She begins by exploring literary depiction of “willful” or “wayward” citizens and those with precarious bodies that are viewed as threatening, undesirable, unacceptable—including refugees and asylum seekers, undocumented migrants, deportees, and stateless people. She also considers the rights to citizenship and political membership claimed by queer bodies and an examination of "new" and alternative forms of citizenship, such as denizenship, urban citizenship, diasporic citizenship, and Indigenous citizenship. With case studies based on works by a diverse collection of authors—including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Djuna Barnes, Etel Adnan, Sarah Schulman, Walt Whitman, Gail Scott, and Philip Roth—Tan uncovers alternative forms of collectivity, community, and nation across a broad range of perspectives. In line with recent cross-disciplinary explorations in the field, Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination shows citizenship as less of a fixed or static legal entity and more as a set of symbolic and cultural practices. Scholars of literary studies, cultural studies, and citizenship studies will be grateful for Tan’s illuminating study.

Redefining Australians

Author: Ann-Mari Jordens
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015034549470
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Australia

This book provides the historical context for current debates on national identity, the need for a republic, the meaning of citizenship, and immigration. It details the reforms essential to successfully absorb a diverse migrant population.

Making Citizens in Africa

Author: Lahra Smith
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107328808
Release Date: 2013-05-20
Genre: Political Science

Smith argues that citizenship creation and expansion is a pivotal part of political contestation in Africa today. Citizenship is a powerful analytical tool to approach political life in contemporary Africa because the institutional and structural reforms of the past two decades have been inextricably linked with the battle over the 'right to have rights'. Professor Lahra Smith's work advances the notion of meaningful citizenship, referring to the ways in which rights are exercised, or the effective practice of citizenship. Using data from Ethiopia and developing a historically informed study of language policy, ethnicity and gender identities, Smith analyzes the contestation over citizenship that engages the state, social movements and individuals in substantive ways. By combining original data on language policy in contemporary Ethiopia with detailed historical study and a focus on ethnicity, citizenship and gender, this work brings a fresh approach to Ethiopian political development and contemporary citizenship concerns across Africa.

Which People s War

Author: Sonya O. Rose
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199273171
Release Date: 2004
Genre: History

Which People's War? examines how national belonging, or British national identity, was envisaged in the public culture of the World War II home front. Using materials from newspapers, magazines, films, novels, diaries, letters, and all sorts of public documents, it explores such questions as: who was included as 'British' and what did it mean to be British? How did the British describe themselves as a singular people, and what were the consequences of those depictions? It also examines the several meanings of citizenship elaborated in various discussions concerning the British nation at war. This investigation of the powerful constructions of national identity and understandings of citizenship circulating in Britain during the Second World War exposes their multiple and contradictory consequences at the time. It reveals the fragility of any singular conception of 'Britishness' even during a war that involved the total mobilization of the country's citizenry and cost 400,000 British civilian lives.

The Condition of Citizenship

Author: Bart Van Steenbergen
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781446265789
Release Date: 1994-03-04
Genre: Social Science

This innovative volume explores ways in which the idea of citizenship can be seen as a unifying concept in understanding contemporary social change and social problems. The book outlines traditional linkages between citizenship and public participation, national identity and social welfare, and shows the relevance of citizenship for a range of rising issues extending from global change through gender to the environment. The areas investigated include: the challenge of internationalization to the nation state and to national identities; the contested nature of citizenship in relation to poverty, work and welfare; the implications of gender inequality; and the potential for new conceptions of citizenship in response to cultural and political change.

The Right to Belong

Author: Richard Weight
Publisher: I.B. Tauris
ISBN: 1784531804
Release Date: 2015-06-01
Genre: History

The period 1940-1960 was a time of considerable change in British society. It saw the emergence of mass democracy, a world war and then unprecedented affluence. Change brought uncertainty among Britain s elites, which in turn encouraged them to reflect more acutely on the direction the nation was taking. Questions were posed: what was the social role of ordinary men and women in 20th-century Britain? What were their needs, their rights, their responsibilities? How did they stand in relation not only to the State but to their regions and communities? And how were those objects of loyalty or disloyalty defined? Who, in other words, were the British, and by what processes did they come to be so considered?; The contributors explore the development of these ideas by a variety of individuals and organizations, and the relationship between these opinion-makers and political parties. They also examine the extent to which their conclusions were translated into social policy in an attempt to shape the evolution of modern Britain."

Multiculturalism

Author: Tariq Modood
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780745669649
Release Date: 2013-04-30
Genre: Social Science

At a time when many public commentators are turning against multiculturalism in response to fears about militant Islam, immigration or social cohesion, Tariq Modood, one of the world's leading authorities on multiculturalism, provides a distinctive contribution to these debates. He contends that the rise of Islamic terrorism has neither discredited multiculturalism nor heralded a clash of civilizations. Instead, it has highlighted a central challenge for the 21st century - the urgent need to include Muslims in contemporary conceptions of democratic citizenship. In the second edition of this popular and compelling book, Modood updates his original argument with two new chapters. He reassesses the relationship between multiculturalism, cosmopolitanism and assimilation, demonstrating that multiculturalism is crucial for successful integration. He also argues that while multiculturalism poses a significant challenge to existing forms of secularism, this challenge should not be exaggerated into a crisis. In so doing, Modood adds new vigor to the claim that multiculturalism remains a living force which is shaping our polities, even as its death is repeatedly announced. This book will appeal to students, researchers and teachers of politics, sociology and public policy, as well as to anyone interested in the prospects of multiculturalism today.

Experiencing Puerto Rican Citizenship and Cultural Nationalism

Author: J. Font-Guzmán
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137455222
Release Date: 2016-02-09
Genre: Political Science

Drawing from in-depth interviews with a group of Puerto Ricans who requested a certificate of Puerto Rican citizenship, legal and historical documents, and official reports not publicly accessible, Jacqueline Font-Guzmán shares how some Puerto Ricans construct and experience their citizenship and national identity at the margins of the US nation.

Citizenship Belonging and Nation States in the Twenty First Century

Author: Nicole Stokes-DuPass
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137536044
Release Date: 2017-07-15
Genre: Social Science

Citizenship, Belonging, and Nation-States in the Twenty-First Century contributes to the scholarship on citizenship and integration by examining belonging in an array of national settings and by demonstrating how nation-states continue to matter in citizenship analysis. Citizenship policies are positioned as state mechanisms that actively shape the integration outcomes and experiences of belonging for all who reside within the nation-state. This edited volume contributes an alternative to the promotion of post-national models of membership and emphasizes that the most fundamental facet of citizenship—a status of recognition in relationship to a nation-state—need not be left in the 'relic galleries' of an allegedly outdated political past. This collection offers a timely contribution, both theoretical and empirical, to understanding citizenship, nationalism, and belonging in contexts that feature not only rapid change but also levels of entrenchment in ideological and historical legacies.

Citizenship and National Identity

Author: Lisa Firth
Publisher:
ISBN: 1861683774
Release Date: 2007-01
Genre: Citizenship

What makes a good British citizen? This book covers national identity, voting and government, and young citizens.