The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship

Author: Ayelet Shachar
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780192528414
Release Date: 2017-07-27
Genre: History

Contrary to predictions that it would become increasingly redundant in a globalizing world, citizenship is back with a vengeance. The Oxford Handbook of Citizenship brings together leading experts in law, philosophy, political science, economics, sociology, and geography to provide a multidisciplinary, comparative discussion of different dimensions of citizenship: as legal status and political membership; as rights and obligations; as identity and belonging; as civic virtues and practices of engagement; and as a discourse of political and social equality or responsibility for a common good. The contributors engage with some of the oldest normative and substantive quandaries in the literature, dilemmas that have renewed salience in today's political climate. As well as setting an agenda for future theoretical and empirical explorations, this Handbook explores the state of citizenship today in an accessible and engaging manner that will appeal to a wide academic and non-academic audience. Chapters highlight variations in citizenship regimes practiced in different countries, from immigrant states to 'non-western' contexts, from settler societies to newly independent states, attentive to both migrants and those who never cross an international border. Topics include the 'selling' of citizenship, multilevel citizenship, in-between statuses, citizenship laws, post-colonial citizenship, the impact of technological change on citizenship, and other cutting-edge issues. This Handbook is the major reference work for those engaged with citizenship from a legal, political, and cultural perspective. Written by the most knowledgeable senior and emerging scholars in their fields, this comprehensive volume offers state-of-the-art analyses of the main challenges and prospects of citizenship in today's world of increased migration and globalization. Special emphasis is put on the question of whether inclusive and egalitarian citizenship can provide political legitimacy in a turbulent world of exploding social inequality and resurgent populism.

The Human Right to Citizenship

Author: Rhoda E. Howard-Hassmann
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812291421
Release Date: 2015-05-28
Genre: Law

In principle, no human individual should be rendered stateless: the Universal Declaration of Human Rights stipulates that the right to have or change citizenship cannot be denied. In practice, the legal claim of citizenship is a slippery concept that can be manipulated to serve state interests. On a spectrum from those who enjoy the legal and social benefits of citizenship to those whose right to nationality is outright refused, people with many kinds of status live in various degrees of precariousness within states that cannot or will not protect them. These include documented and undocumented migrants as well as conventional refugees and asylum seekers living in various degrees of uncertainty. Vulnerable populations such as ethnic minorities and women and children may find that de jure citizenship rights are undermined by de facto restrictions on their access, mobility, or security. The Human Right to Citizenship provides an accessible overview of citizenship regimes around the globe, focusing on empirical cases of denied or weakened legal rights. Exploring the legal and social implications of specific national contexts, contributors examine the status of labor migrants in the United States and Canada, the changing definition of citizenship in Nigeria, Germany, India, and Brazil, and the rights of ethnic groups including Palestinians, Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, Bangladeshi migrants to India, and Roma in Europe. Other chapters consider children's rights to citizenship, multiple citizenships, and unwanted citizenships. With a broad geographical scope, this volume provides a wide-ranging theoretical and legal framework to understand the particular ambiguities, paradoxes, and evolutions of citizenship regimes in the twenty-first century. Contributors: Michal Baer, Kristy A. Belton, Jacqueline Bhabha, Thomas Faist, Jenna Hennebry, Nancy Hiemstra, Rhoda E. Howard-Hassmann, Audrey Macklin, Margareta Matache, Janet McLaughlin, Carolina Moulin, Alison Mountz, Helen O'Nions, Chidi Anselm Odinkalu, Sujata Ramachandran, Kim Rygiel, Nasir Uddin, Margaret Walton-Roberts, David S. Weissbrodt.

Immigration and Citizenship in the Twenty first Century

Author: Noah M. Jedidiah Pickus
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780847692217
Release Date: 1998-01-01
Genre: Political Science

In this important book, a distinguished group of historians, political scientists, and legal experts explore three related issues: the Immigration and Naturalization Service's historic review of its citizenship evaluation, recent proposals to alter the oath of allegiance and the laws governing dual citizenship, and the changing rights and responsibilities of citizens and resident aliens in the United States. How Americans address these issues, the contributors argue, will shape broader debates about multiculturalism, civic virtue and national identity. The response will also determine how many immigrants become citizens and under what conditions, what these new citizens learn -- and teach -- about the meaning of American citizenship, and whether Americans regard newcomers as intruders or as fellow citizens with whom they share a common fate.

Diversity and Citizenship

Author: Williams College
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0847680924
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Political Science

In this book, an extraordinarily distinguished group of scholars explores the connection between citizenship and nationhood and the relationship between individual and collective identities. The essays illustrate different ways in which our understanding of the meaning of our "unum" is evolving. They show that while pluralism and an ideal of tolerance of diversity stand in opposition to images of a homogeneous America, they may lead to a deeper universalism, more subtle notions of freedom, equality, more probing discussions of the pursuit of happiness, and broader notions of citizens and nation. Contributors:Robert A. Dahl; Susan Dunn; Nathan Glazer; Gary Jacobsohn; Randall Kennedy; Sanford Levinson; Pauline Maier; Noah M.J. Pickus.

Handbook of Citizenship Studies

Author: Engin F Isin
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 076196858X
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Political Science

'The contributions of Woodiwiss, Lister and Sassen are outstanding but not unrepresentative of the many merits of this excellent collection'- The British Journal of Sociology From women's rights, civil rights, and sexual rights for gays and lesbians to disability rights and language rights, we have experienced in the past few decades a major trend in Western nation-states towards new claims for inclusion. This trend has echoed around the world: from the Zapatistas to Chechen and Kurdish nationalists, social and political movements are framing their struggles in the languages of rights and recognition, and hence, of citizenship. Citizenship has thus become an increasingly important axis in the social sciences. Social scientists have been rethinking the role of political agent or subject. Not only are the rights and obligations of citizens being redefined, but also what it means to be a citizen has become an issue of central concern. As the process of globalization produces multiple diasporas, we can expect increasingly complex relationships between homeland and host societies that will make the traditional idea of national citizenship problematic. As societies are forced to manage cultural difference and associated tensions and conflict, there will be changes in the processes by which states allocate citizenship and a differentiation of the category of citizen. This book constitutes the most authoritative and comprehensive guide to the terrain. Drawing on a wealth of interdisciplinary knowledge, and including some of the leading commentators of the day, it is an essential guide to understanding modern citizenship. About the editors: Engin F Isin is Associate Professor of Social Science at York University. His recent works include Being Political: Genealogies of Citizenship (Minnesota, 2002) and, with P K Wood, Citizenship and Identity (Sage, 1999). He is the Managing Editor of Citizenship Studies. Bryan S Turner is Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. He has written widely on the sociology of citizenship in Citizenship and Capitalism (Unwin Hyman, 1986) and Citizenship and Social Theory (Sage, 1993). He is also the author of The Body and Society (Sage, 1996) and Classical Sociology (Sage, 1999), and has been editor of Citizenship Studies since 1997.

Civic Ideals

Author: Rogers M. Smith
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300078773
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Law

This work traces political struggles over U.S. citizenship laws from the colonial period through to the Progressive era. It shows how and why throughout this time most adults were denied access to full citizenship, including political rights, solely because of their race, ethnicity or gender.

Women and Migration in the U S Mexico Borderlands

Author: Denise A. Segura
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822341182
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

Seminal essays on how women adapt to the structural transformations caused by the large migration from Mexico to the U.S.A., how they create or contest representations of their identities in light of their marginality, and give voice to their own agency.

GCSE Citizenship Studies for AQA

Author: Joan Campbell
Publisher: Heinemann
ISBN: 0435808109
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Citizenship

This text offers comprehensive exam advice to help students prepare effectively for the exam.

Immigration as a Democratic Challenge

Author: Ruth Rubio-Marín
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521777704
Release Date: 2000-05
Genre: Law

Examining Germany and the United States, this book argues that immigration policy in Western democracies is unjust and undemocratic.

Marriage Dowry and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy

Author: Julius Kirshner
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442664524
Release Date: 2015-02-26
Genre: History

Through his research on the status of women in Florence and other Italian cities, Julius Kirshner helped to establish the socio-legal history of women in late medieval and Renaissance Italy and challenge the idea that Florentine women had an inferior legal position and civic status. In Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy, Kirshner collects nine important essays which address these issues in Florence and the cities of northern and central Italy. Using a cross-disciplinary approach that draws on the methodologies of both social and legal history, the essays in this collection present a wealth of examples of daughters, wives, and widows acting as full-fledged social and legal actors. Revised and updated to reflect current scholarship, the essays in Marriage, Dowry, and Citizenship in Late Medieval and Renaissance Italy appear alongside an extended introduction which situates them within the broader field of Renaissance legal history.

Human Rights Migration and Social Conflict

Author: Ariadna Estévez
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137097552
Release Date: 2012-07-02
Genre: Political Science

This book uses human rights as part of a constructivist methodology designed to establish a causal relationship between human rights violations and different types of social and political conflict in Europe and North America.

Federalism Citizenship and Collective Identities in U S History

Author: Cornelis A. van Minnen
Publisher: Vu University Press Amsterdam
ISBN: STANFORD:36105110930521
Release Date: 2000-01-01
Genre: Political Science

This book highlights key aspects of the American experience inn forging political, social, and cultural identities from the late eighteenth century to the present