Civil Rights and Constitutional Litigation

Author: Charles F. Abernathy
Publisher: West Academic
ISBN: 0314267875
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Law

The new 5th edition retains the statute-based focus of the original, guiding students through the rules, doctrines, and theories that apply to major litigation under the three generations of primary civil rights statutes (the original statutes, sections 1983, 1981, 1982, and 1985(3), with their emphasis on constitutional litigation; the revolutionary statutes of the 1960's and early 1970's, Title VII, Title VI, the Voting Rights Act, and section 504), and the evolutionary enactments after 1990 (the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Civil Rights Amendments of 1991, and the judicially-limited Violence Against Women Act). The 5th edition continues an emphasis begun in the 4th edition on legal realism and how the statutes respond to or fail to ameliorate real-life problems. The combination of statutory coverage and legal realism allows each professor to choose the topical areas and political viewpoints that he or she wishes to emphasize. In addition to widespread general updating, the new 5th edition significantly expands on prior editions with a new focus on Fourth Amendment litigation post-Scott, several new approaches both substantive and procedural -- to official immunity defenses, and new cases relating to the increasingly fractured sovereign immunity defense. In addition, a significant new sub-section explores the Supreme Court's attempt in the Ricci case to adjust the relation between disparate impact and disparate treatment analyses, highlighting its substantial impact on affirmative action concepts as well. Finally, the new 5th edition also covers the 2008 Amendments to the Americans With Disabilities Act and their significant alteration of the Court's previous attempts to restrict disability litigation. The new edition will also include any new decisions anticipated thro

Making Civil Rights Law

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195359224
Release Date: 1994-02-24
Genre: Law

From the 1930s to the early 1960s civil rights law was made primarily through constitutional litigation. Before Rosa Parks could ignite a Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Supreme Court had to strike down the Alabama law which made segregated bus service required by law; before Martin Luther King could march on Selma to register voters, the Supreme Court had to find unconstitutional the Southern Democratic Party's exclusion of African-Americans; and before the March on Washington and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Supreme Court had to strike down the laws allowing for the segregation of public graduate schools, colleges, high schools, and grade schools. Making Civil Rights Law provides a chronological narrative history of the legal struggle, led by Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that preceded the political battles for civil rights. Drawing on interviews with Thurgood Marshall and other NAACP lawyers, as well as new information about the private deliberations of the Supreme Court, Tushnet tells the dramatic story of how the NAACP Legal Defense Fund led the Court to use the Constitution as an instrument of liberty and justice for all African-Americans. He also offers new insights into how the justices argued among themselves about the historic changes they were to make in American society. Making Civil Rights Law provides an overall picture of the forces involved in civil rights litigation, bringing clarity to the legal reasoning that animated this "Constitutional revolution", and showing how the slow development of doctrine and precedent reflected the overall legal strategy of Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.

Understanding Civil Rights Litigation

Author: Howard M. Wasserman
Publisher: Carolina Academic Press LLC
ISBN: 1531003664
Release Date: 2018
Genre: Civil procedure

"This book provides an overview of civil rights and constitutional litigation under Section 1983 and its Bivens federal counterpart. The book is written for courses on Civil Rights Litigation and Federal Courts"-- Provided by publisher.

From Jim Crow to Civil Rights

Author: Michael J. Klarman
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195310184
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Law

While Brown vs. Board of Education had a significant impact by bringing race issues to public attention and mobilizing supporters of the ruling, it also energized the opposition. In this account of the history of constitutional law concerning race, legal scholar Michael Klarman details the ways in which Supreme Court decisions have had consequences for race relations in America.--From publisher description

Civil Rights and Public Accommodations

Author: Richard C. Cortner
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015050474850
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Law

The struggle for civil rights in America was fought at the lunch counter as well as in the streets. It ultimately found victory in the halls of government—but, as Richard Cortner reveals, only through a creative use of congressional power and critical judicial decisions. Title II of the 1964 Civil Rights Act prohibited discrimination in public accommodations, and shortly after its passage blacks were refused service at the Heart of Atlanta Motel and at Ollie's Barbecue in Birmingham, Alabama, as a test of the new law by business owners who claimed the right to choose their own customers. These challenges made their way to the Supreme Court, becoming landmark cases frequently cited in law. Until now, however, they have never benefited from book-length analysis. Cortner provides an inside account of the litigation in both decisions to tell how they spelled the end to segregation in the South The fact that blacks could not travel in the South without assured access to food and lodging led Congress to enforce civil rights on the basis of its authority to regulate interstate commerce. The Supreme Court unanimously sustained Title II's constitutionality under the commerce clause in both test cases, joining the executive and legislative branches in defining the power of the federal government to desegregate society, even by circuitous means. Drawing on justice department files, Supreme Court justices' papers, and records of defense attorneys, Cortner provides the background for the cases, including previous legal battles over sit-ins. He describes the roles of key players in the litigation—particularly Solicitor General Archibald Cox and members of the Warren Court. In addition, he uses presidential files, oral histories, and other primary sources to give readers a clear picture of the forces at work in the creation, implementation, and validation of the Civil Rights Act. Cortner's thorough account illuminates the nature of constitutional litigation and the judicial process, as well as the role of the Constitution and law, in two decisions that marked the crowning achievement of the civil rights movement and changed the face of America forever.

Encyclopedia of American Civil Rights and Liberties Revised and Expanded Edition 2nd Edition 4 volumes

Author: Kara E. Stooksbury
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781440841101
Release Date: 2017-09-21
Genre: Law

Thoroughly updated and featuring 75 new entries, this monumental four-volume work illuminates past and present events associated with civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. • Offers 686 alphabetically arranged entries, ranging from thoroughly updated entries from the first edition to 75 new entries that cover dramatic changes in civil rights and liberties in the last decade • Covers the latest events and controversies surrounding civil liberties issues in America • Fully explores the scope and limitations of Constitutional rights, a perennially hot topic in American politics and society • Includes primary documents with contextual headnotes to enhance understanding of the full importance of the featured document • Provides sources for further reading with each entry to help users engage in additional research

The Litigation State

Author: Sean Farhang
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400836786
Release Date: 2010-08-02
Genre: Law

Of the 1.65 million lawsuits enforcing federal laws over the past decade, 3 percent were prosecuted by the federal government, while 97 percent were litigated by private parties. When and why did private plaintiff-driven litigation become a dominant model for enforcing federal regulation? The Litigation State shows how government legislation created the nation's reliance upon private litigation, and investigates why Congress would choose to mobilize, through statutory design, private lawsuits to implement federal statutes. Sean Farhang argues that Congress deliberately cultivates such private lawsuits partly as a means of enforcing its will over the resistance of opposing presidents. Farhang reveals that private lawsuits, functioning as an enforcement resource, are a profoundly important component of American state capacity. He demonstrates how the distinctive institutional structure of the American state--particularly conflict between Congress and the president over control of the bureaucracy--encourages Congress to incentivize private lawsuits. Congress thereby achieves regulatory aims through a decentralized army of private lawyers, rather than by well-staffed bureaucracies under the president's influence. The historical development of ideological polarization between Congress and the president since the late 1960s has been a powerful cause of the explosion of private lawsuits enforcing federal law over the same period. Using data from many policy areas spanning the twentieth century, and historical analysis focused on civil rights, The Litigation State investigates how American political institutions shape the strategic design of legislation to mobilize private lawsuits for policy implementation.

Verteidigung

Author: John Grisham
Publisher: Heyne Verlag
ISBN: 9783641110307
Release Date: 2013-03-18
Genre: Fiction

»Dieser Thriller wird sie nicht mehr loslassen.« Brigitte Als Harvard-Absolvent David Zinc bei einer der angesehensten Anwaltskanzleien Chicagos anheuert, scheint seiner Karriere nichts mehr im Weg zu stehen. Doch der Job erweist sich als die Hölle. Fünf Jahre später zieht David die Reißleine und kündigt. Stattdessen fängt er bei Finley & Figg an, einer auf Verkehrsunfälle spezialisierten Vorstadt-Kanzlei, deren chaotische Partner zunächst nicht wissen, was sie mit ihm anfangen sollen. Bis die Kanzlei ihren ersten großen Fall an Land zieht. Der Prozess könnte Millionen einspielen – die Feuertaufe für David.

Race Relations Litigation in an Age of Complexity

Author: Stephen L. Wasby
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813915732
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Law

The first book-length study of civil rights litigation from the late 1960s through the early 1980s, Race Relations Litigation in an Age of Complexity fills a void in the scholarly literature on American courts and poltics in the post Brown versus Board of Education era.

Civil Liberties and the Constitution

Author: Lucius J Barker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317349518
Release Date: 2018-10-24
Genre: Political Science

Updated in a new 9th edition, this casebook explores civil liberty problems through a study of leading judicial decisions. It offers a reasonable sample of cases across a broad spectrum of rights and liberties. This book introduces groups of featured cases with in-depth commentaries that set the specific historical-legal context of which they are a part, allowing readers to examine significant portions of court opinions, including major arguments from majority, concurring, and dissenting opinions.

America s Lone Star Constitution

Author: Lucas A. Powe
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520297807
Release Date: 2018-04-27
Genre: Law

Texas has created more constitutional law than any other state. In any classroom nationwide, any basic constitutional law course can be taught using nothing but Texas cases. That, however, understates the history and politics behind the cases. Beyond representing all doctrinal areas of constitutional law, Texas cases deal with the major issues of the nation. Leading legal scholar and Supreme Court historian Lucas A. Powe, Jr. charts the rich and pervasive development of Texas-inspired constitutional law. From voting rights to railroad regulations, or school finance to capital punishment, or poverty to civil liberties, this wide-ranging and eminently readable book provides a window into the relationship between constitutional litigation and ordinary politics at the Supreme Court, illuminating how all of the fiercest national divides over what the Constitution means took shape in Texas.