Secrets of Cold War Technology

Author: Gerry Vassilatos
Publisher:
ISBN: 0932813801
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Science

The death knell has struck. Wave Radio is dead. How have 70 years of Military Research succeeded in producing a completely new and superior communications technology? Radio History gives a stranger walk than paranoid writers ever tell! While citizens were watching television, military research was directed to create an amazing radiation technology far in advance of any system known. Currently and routinely utilised, it has remained a well guarded 'open secret' for decades. The proof patents and relevant research papers have just been retrieved. Facts quell hysteria, but Truth is stranger than fiction. Want the answers? The complete technical history of military projects will show the development of every relevant project preceding HAARP. Only the facts. No hysteria. Complete with communications and weapons patent citations, this book will forever change your view of world events and technology.

The Weapons Legacy of the Cold War

Author: Dietrich Schroeer
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780429773105
Release Date: 2018-12-12
Genre: Political Science

First published in 1997, this volume builds its discussion on a technological base along with policy implications, and constitutes a review of the current situation in international security created by the Cold War, and how the end of the Cold War is likely to change the situation. As the close of the Cold War created a multitude of changes in international security, resulting in a broad range of topics tackled in this collection. It features specialists in military technology, physics, political science, public and international affairs.

Engineering Asia

Author: Hiromi Mizuno
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781350063945
Release Date: 2018-08-09
Genre: History

Weaving together chapters on imperial Japan's wartime mobilization, Asia's first wave of postwar decolonization, and Cold War geopolitical conflict in the region, Engineering Asia seeks to demonstrate how Asia's present prosperity did not arise from a so-called 'economic miracle' but from the violent and dynamic events of the 20th century. The book argues that what continued to operate throughout these tumultuous eras were engineering networks of technology. Constructed at first for colonial development under Japan, these networks transformed into channels of overseas development aid that constituted the Cold War system in Asia. Through highlighting how these networks helped shape Asia's contemporary economic landscape, Engineering Asia challenges dominant narratives in Western scholarship of an 'economic miracle' in Japan and South Korea, and the 'Asian Tigers' of Southeast Asia. Students and scholars of East Asian studies, development studies, postcolonialism, Cold War studies and the history of technology and science will find this book immensely useful.

Science and Technology in the Global Cold War

Author: Naomi Oreskes
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262027953
Release Date: 2014-11-07
Genre: Science

The Cold War period saw a dramatic expansion of state-funded science and technology research. Government and military patronage shaped Cold War technoscientific practices, imposing methods that were project oriented, team based, and subject to national-security restrictions. These changes affected not just the arms race and the space race but also research in agriculture, biomedicine, computer science, ecology, meteorology, and other fields. This volume examines science and technology in the context of the Cold War, considering whether the new institutions and institutional arrangements that emerged globally constrained technoscientific inquiry or offered greater opportunities for it. The contributors find that whatever the particular science, and whatever the political system in which that science was operating, the knowledge that was produced bore some relation to the goals of the nation-state. These goals varied from nation to nation; weapons research was emphasized in the United States and the Soviet Union, for example, but in France and China scientific independence and self-reliance dominated. The contributors also consider to what extent the changes to science and technology practices in this era were produced by the specific politics, anxieties, and aspirations of the Cold War.ContributorsElena Aronova, Erik M. Conway, Angela N. H. Creager, David Kaiser, John Krige, Naomi Oreskes, George Reisch, Sigrid Schmalzer, Sonja D. Schmid, Matthew Shindell, Asif A. Siddiqi, Zuoyue Wang, Benjamin Wilson

The Cold War for Information Technology

Author: Janez Škrubej
Publisher: Strategic Book Publishing
ISBN: 9781618978356
Release Date: 2012-12
Genre: Fiction

The Cold War for Information Technology is a captivating new book that uncovers a little-known but vital battle to gain control over IT development that took place in the final two decades of the 20th century. As you might expect, intelligence agencies from the United States, the Soviet Union, India, and China all played major roles. However, remarkably, an IT company from Tito's unaligned Yugoslavia called Iskra Delta wound up right in the middle of this epic struggle to control IT. For despite its small size, Iskra Delta obtained permission from the U.S. to work through the U.S. embargo that at the time prohibited exporting information technology to the East. Being at a kind of digital crossroads for the East and West gave the company a massive influence that belied its small size. By 1986 the tiny Yugoslav IT company had built one of the largest computer networks in the world for the Chinese police. But Iskra Delta's innovativeness would ultimately draw it into the center of the international struggle to control the emerging IT world with presidents of the Soviet Union, China and India personally paying a visit.Suddenly the company was in the crosshairs of international intelligence agencies like the CIA and the KGB. Author Janez Skrubej was managing Iskra Delta during the time all of this was taking place and witnessed The Cold War for Information Technology first hand. This book is his story. Janez Skrubej is a retired IT professional and MIT alumnus who lives in the picturesque village of Rudolfovo, Slovenia. When he is not writing, Janez enjoys keeping up with the latest IT news and making his own plum brandy. Publisher's website: http: //sbpra.com/JanezSkrube

Reassessing Cold War Europe

Author: Sari Autio-Sarasmo
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136898341
Release Date: 2010-10-18
Genre: History

This book presents a comprehensive reassessment of Europe in the Cold War period, 1945-91. Contrary to popular belief, it shows that relations between East and West were based not only on confrontation and mutual distrust, but also on collaboration. The authors reveal that - despite opposing ideologies - there was in fact considerable interaction and exchange between different Eastern and Western actors (such states, enterprises, associations, organisations and individuals) irrespective of the Iron Curtain. This book challenges both the traditional understanding of the East-West juxtaposition and the relevancy of the Iron Curtain. Covering the full period, and taking into account a range of spheres including trade, scientific-technical co-operation, and cultural and social exchanges, it reveals how smaller countries and smaller actors in Europe were able to forge and implement their agendas within their own blocs. The books suggests that given these lower-level actors engaged in mutually beneficial cooperation, often running counter to the ambitions of the bloc-leaders, the rules of Cold War interaction were not, in fact, exclusively dictated by the superpowers.

Literary Cold War 1945 to Vietnam

Author: Adam Piette
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 9780748635283
Release Date: 2009-05-25
Genre: Literary Collections

This is a ground-breaking study of the psychological and cultural impact of the Cold War on the imaginations of citizens in the UK and US. The Literary Cold War examines writers working at the hazy borders between aesthetic project and political allegory, with specific attention being paid to Vladimir Nabokov and Graham Greene as Cold War writers. The book looks at the special relationship as a form of paranoid plotline governing key Anglo-American texts from Storm Jameson to Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, as well as examining the figure of the non-aligned neutral observer caught up in the sacrificial triangles structuring cold war fantasy. The book aims to consolidate and define a new emergent field in literary studies, the literary Cold War, following the lead of prominent historians of the period.

Technology and the American Way of War Since 1945

Author: Thomas G. Mahnken
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231517881
Release Date: 2010-06-24
Genre: History

No nation in recent history has placed greater emphasis on the role of technology in planning and waging war than the United States. In World War II the wholesale mobilization of American science and technology culminated in the detonation of the atomic bomb. Competition with the Soviet Union during the Cold War, combined with the U.S. Navy's culture of distributed command and the rapid growth of information technology, spawned the concept of network-centric warfare. And America's post-Cold War conflicts in Iraq, the former Yugoslavia, and Afghanistan have highlighted America's edge. From the atom bomb to the spy satellites of the Cold War, the strategic limitations of the Vietnam War, and the technological triumphs of the Gulf war, Thomas G. Mahnken follows the development and integration of new technologies into the military and emphasizes their influence on the organization, mission, and culture of the armed services. In some cases, advancements in technology have forced different branches of the military to develop competing or superior weaponry, but more often than not the armed services have molded technology to suit their own purposes, remaining resilient in the face of technological challenges. Mahnken concludes with an examination of the reemergence of the traditional American way of war, which uses massive force to engage the enemy. Tying together six decades of debate concerning U.S. military affairs, he discusses how the armed forces might exploit the unique opportunities of the information revolution in the future.

Cold War Kitchen

Author: Ruth Oldenziel
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: UOM:39015077145913
Release Date: 2009
Genre: History

The kitchen as political symbol and material reality in the cold war years.

Mapping the Cold War

Author: Timothy Barney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469618555
Release Date: 2015-04-13
Genre: History

In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War–era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world--and the maps that account for them--are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.

American Technology Policy

Author: J. D. Kenneth Boutin
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 9781612345871
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Electronic books

Balancing the requirements of national security and economic competitiveness

The Cold War

Author: Peter Duignan
Publisher: Hoover Press
ISBN: 0817937935
Release Date:
Genre:


Military R D after the Cold War

Author: Philip Gummett
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0792341392
Release Date: 1996-07-31
Genre: Business & Economics

Countries establish defence industries for various reasons. Chief among these are usually a concern with national security, and a desire to be as independent as possible in the supply of the armaments which they believe they need. But defence industries are different from most other industries. Their customer is governments. Their product is intended to safeguard the most vital interests of the state. The effectiveness of these products (in the real, rather than the experimental sense) is not normally tested at the time of purchase. If, or when, it is tested, many other factors (such as the quality of political and military leadership) enter into the equation, so complicating judgments about the quality of the armaments, and about the reliability of the promises made by the manufacturers. All of these features make the defence sector an unusually political industrial sector. This has been true in both the command economies of the former Soviet Union and its satellites, and in the market or mixed economies of the west. In both cases, to speak only a little over-generally, the defence sector has been particularly privileged and particularly protected from the usual economic vicissitudes. In both cases, too, its centrality to the perceived vital interests of the state has given it an unusual degree of political access and support.

Competing with the Soviets

Author: Audra J. Wolfe
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9781421407715
Release Date: 2012-11-29
Genre: Science

For most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except open military engagement. The Cold War placed two opposite conceptions of the good society before the uncommitted world and history itself, and science figured prominently in the picture. Competing with the Soviets offers a short, accessible introduction to the special role that science and technology played in maintaining state power during the Cold War, from the atomic bomb to the Human Genome Project. The high-tech machinery of nuclear physics and the space race are at the center of this story, but Audra J. Wolfe also examines the surrogate battlefield of scientific achievement in such diverse fields as urban planning, biology, and economics; explains how defense-driven federal investments created vast laboratories and research programs; and shows how unfamiliar worries about national security and corrosive questions of loyalty crept into the supposedly objective scholarly enterprise. Based on the assumption that scientists are participants in the culture in which they live, Competing with the Soviets looks beyond the debate about whether military influence distorted science in the Cold War. Scientists’ choices and opportunities have always been shaped by the ideological assumptions, political mandates, and social mores of their times. The idea that American science ever operated in a free zone outside of politics is, Wolfe argues, itself a legacy of the ideological Cold War that held up American science, and scientists, as beacons of freedom in contrast to their peers in the Soviet Union. Arranged chronologically and thematically, the book highlights how ideas about the appropriate relationships among science, scientists, and the state changed over time. -- Michael D. Gordin, Princeton University