Judicial Process Law Courts and Politics in the United States

Author: David W. Neubauer
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305506527
Release Date: 2016-01-01
Genre: Education

Working within the framework of law and politics, JUDICIAL PROCESS: LAW, COURTS, AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES combines detailed information about the major structures and processes of the American judiciary with an insider's understanding of the importance of courthouse dynamics. From the organization and procedures of the various courts to the current applications of specific laws, the 7th edition explores the roles and impact of the judicial system. Throughout the text, the authors not only explain what the legal rules are but also explore each rule's underlying assumptions, history, and goals, providing a complete and balanced look at the role of the judicial system today. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Routledge Handbook of Judicial Behavior

Author: Robert M. Howard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317430384
Release Date: 2017-10-02
Genre: Political Science

Interest in social science and empirical analyses of law, courts and specifically the politics of judges has never been higher or more salient. Consequently, there is a strong need for theoretical work on the research that focuses on courts, judges and the judicial process. The Routledge Handbook of Judicial Behavior provides the most up to date examination of scholarship across the entire spectrum of judicial politics and behavior, written by a combination of currently prominent scholars and the emergent next generation of researchers. Unlike almost all other volumes, this Handbook examines judicial behavior from both an American and Comparative perspective.? Part 1 provides a broad overview of the dominant Theoretical and Methodological perspectives used to examine and understand judicial behavior, Part 2 offers an in-depth analysis of the various current scholarly areas examining the U.S. Supreme Court, Part 3 moves from the Supreme Court to examining other U.S. federal and state courts, and Part 4 presents a comprehensive overview of Comparative Judicial Politics and Transnational Courts. Each author in this volume provides perspectives on the most current methodological and substantive approaches in their respective areas, along with suggestions for future research. The chapters contained within will generate additional scholarly and public interest by focusing on topics most salient to the academic, legal and policy communities.

The Most Dangerous Branch

Author: David A. Kaplan
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 9781524759926
Release Date: 2018-09-04
Genre: Political Science

In the bestselling tradition of The Nine and The Brethren, The Most Dangerous Branch takes us inside the secret world of the Supreme Court. David A. Kaplan, the former legal affairs editor of Newsweek, shows how the justices subvert the role of the other branches of government—and how we’ve come to accept it at our peril. With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Court has never before been more central in American life. It is the nine justices who too often now decide the controversial issues of our time—from abortion and same-sex marriage, to gun control, campaign finance and voting rights. The Court is so crucial that many voters in 2016 made their choice based on whom they thought their presidential candidate would name to the Court. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch—the key decision of his new administration. The next justice—replacing Anthony Kennedy—will be even more important, holding the swing vote over so much social policy. Is that really how democracy is supposed to work? Based on exclusive interviews with the justices and dozens of their law clerks, Kaplan provides fresh details about life behind the scenes at the Court – Clarence Thomas’s simmering rage, Antonin Scalia’s death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s celebrity, Breyer Bingo, the petty feuding between Gorsuch and the chief justice, and what John Roberts thinks of his critics. Kaplan presents a sweeping narrative of the justices’ aggrandizement of power over the decades – from Roe v. Wade to Bush v. Gore to Citizens United, to rulings during the 2017-18 term. But the arrogance of the Court isn’t partisan: Conservative and liberal justices alike are guilty of overreach. Challenging conventional wisdom about the Court’s transcendent power, The Most Dangerous Branch is sure to rile both sides of the political aisle.

A Novel Approach to Politics

Author: Douglas A. Van Belle
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 9781506368665
Release Date: 2017-11-14
Genre: Political Science

A Novel Approach to Politics turns conventional textbook wisdom on its head by using pop culture references to illustrate key concepts and cover recent political events. This is a textbook you will want to read. Adopters of previous editions from schools all over the country are thanking author Douglas A. Van Belle for some of their best student evaluations to date. With this Fifth Edition, Douglas A. Van Belle brings the book fully up to date with recent events such as Trump’s executive orders on immigration, the 2016 elections in the US, current policy debates including recent court decisions that may affect gerrymandering, international happenings such as Brexit, and other assorted intergalactic matters. Van Belle adds a wealth of new and recent movies and books to the text, as he illustrates key concepts in political science through examples that captivate you. Employing a wide range of references from 1984 to Game of Thrones to House of Cards, students are given a solid foundation in institutions, ideology, and economics. To keep things grounded, the textbook nuts and bolts are still there to aid students, including chapter objectives, chapter summaries, bolded key terms, and discussion questions.

Breaking the Deadlock

Author: Richard A. Posner
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400824281
Release Date: 2001-07-05
Genre: Political Science

The 2000 Presidential election ended in a collision of history, law, and the courts. It produced a deadlock that dragged out the result for over a month, and consequences--real and imagined--that promise to drag on for years. In the first in-depth study of the election and its litigious aftermath, Judge Posner surveys the history and theory of American electoral law and practice, analyzes which Presidential candidate ''really'' won the popular vote in Florida, surveys the litigation that ensued, evaluates the courts, the lawyers, and the commentators, and ends with a blueprint for reforming our Presidential electoral practices. The book starts with an overview of the electoral process, including its history and guiding theories. It looks next at the Florida election itself, exploring which candidate ''really'' won and whether this is even a meaningful question. The focus then shifts to the complex litigation, both state and federal, provoked by the photo finish. On the basis of the pragmatic jurisprudence that Judge Posner has articulated and defended in his previous writings, this book offers an alternative justification for the Supreme Court's decision in Bush v. Gore while praising the Court for averting the chaotic consequences of an unresolved deadlock. Posner also evaluates the performance of the lawyers who conducted the post-election litigation and of the academics who commented on the unfolding drama. He argues that neither Gore's nor Bush's lawyers blundered seriously, but that the reaction of the legal professoriat to the litigation exposed serious flaws in the academic practice of constitutional law. While rejecting such radical moves as abolishing the Electoral College or creating a national ballot, Posner concludes with a detailed plan of feasible reforms designed to avoid a repetition of the 2000 election fiasco. Lawyers, political scientists, pundits, and politicians are waiting to hear what Judge Posner has to say. But this book is written for and will be welcomed by all who were riveted by the recent crisis of presidential succession.

International Courts and the African Woman Judge

Author: Josephine Jarpa Dawuni
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781315444420
Release Date: 2017-11-28
Genre: Social Science

A sequel to Bauer and Dawuni's pioneering study on gender and the judiciary in Africa (Routledge, 2016), International Courts and the African Woman Judge examines questions on gender diversity, representative benches, and international courts by focusing on women judges from the continent of Africa. Drawing from postcolonial feminism, feminist institutionalism, feminist legal theory, and legal narratives, this book provides fresh and detailed narratives of seven women judges that challenge existing discourse on gender diversity in international courts. It answers important questions about how the politics of judicial appointments, gender, geographic location, class, and professional capital combine to shape the lives of women judges who sit on international courts and argues the need to disaggregate gender diversity with a view to understanding intra-group differences. International Courts and the African Woman Judge will be of interest to a variety of audiences including governments, policy makers, civil society organizations, students of gender studies, and feminist activists interested in all questions of gender and judging.

Courts Judges and Politics

Author: Lee Epstein, Dr.
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 0072977051
Release Date: 2005-04-19
Genre: Political Science

This classic reader has been a best selling component of the Judicial Process/Judicial Politics/American Legal System course for years. The sixth edition has been thoroughly updated while retaining the features that made it attractive for so long: its effective structure, thorough coverage, narrative voice, choice of excerpts, and teaching flexibility.

Embedded Courts

Author: Kwai Hang Ng
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108420495
Release Date: 2017-10-26
Genre: Computers

A study of the decision-making process of Chinese courts and the non-legal forces and regional factors that influence judicial outcomes.

Politics and the Courts

Author: Barbara M. Yarnold
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN: UCAL:B4396947
Release Date: 1992-01-01
Genre: Law

In the public law area, it has been noted that judicial decisionmaking is not always objective, that the courts are not constrained by the law and the facts of the case, and that courts are actually policymakers influenced by extraneous factors having little to do with the legal and factual matters of a case. Yarnold argues that the public law area has discarded the traditional view of the judiciary as a passive interpreter of the law. She examines political and environmental variables that have been used to explain judicial outcomes and develops an original theory of public law explaining under what circumstances political variables impact court decisions, and when region, as an environmental variable, is related to judicial outcomes.

International Courts and Domestic Politics

Author: Marlene Wind
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781108427760
Release Date: 2018-07-31
Genre: Law

Explores how and why the rise in international courts impacts on domestic politics on both national and international levels.

Butterfly Politics

Author: Catharine A. MacKinnon
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674416604
Release Date: 2017-04-17
Genre: Law

The miniscule motion of a butterfly’s wings can trigger a tornado half a world away, according to chaos theory. Catharine A. MacKinnon’s collected work on gender inequality—including new pieces—argues that the right seemingly minor interventions in the legal realm can have a butterfly effect that generates major social and cultural transformations.

Governing from the Bench

Author: Emmett Macfarlane
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 9780774823500
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Law

"As Canada's final court of appeal, the Supreme Court is a crucial component of the country's legal system. Yet, for much of its almost 140-year history, the highest court in the land dwelled in relative obscurity. More than thirty years since the advent of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which transformed the court's function and thrust its work into the national spotlight, many of us are still in the dark about the Supreme Court's role--in part because there has been relatively little empirical investigation into how the institution works. In Governing from the Bench, Emmett Macfarlane draws on interviews with current and former justices, law clerks, and other staff members of the court to shed light on the institution's internal environment and decision-making processes. He explores the complex role of the Supreme Court as an institution; exposes the rules, conventions, and norms that shape and constrain its justices' behaviour; and situates the court in its broader governmental and societal context, as it relates to the elected branches of government, the media, and the public. At once enlightening and engaging, Governing from the Bench is a much-needed and comprehensive exploration of an institution that touches the lives of all Canadians"--Provided by publisher.

The Choices Justices Make

Author: Lee Epstein
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9781483304854
Release Date: 1997-01-01
Genre: Political Science

The Choices Justices Make is a groundbreaking work that offers a strategic account of Supreme Court decision making. Justices realize that their ability to achieve their policy and other goals depends on the preferences of other actors, the choices they expect others to make, and the institutional context in which they act. All these factors hold sway over justices as they make their decisions, from which cases to accept, to how to interact with their colleagues, and what policies to adopt in their opinions. Choices is a thought-provoking, yet nontechnical work that is an ideal supplement for judicial process and public law courses. In addition to offering a unique and sustained theoretical account, the authors tell a fascinating story of how the Court works. Data culled from the Court's public records and from the private papers of Justices Brennan, Douglas, Marshall, and Powell provide empirical evidence to support the central argument, while numerous examples from the justices' papers animate the work.