Creole New Orleans

Author: Arnold R. Hirsch
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807117749
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Social Science

This collection of six original essays explores the peculiar ethnic composition and history of New Orleans, which the authors persuasively argue is unique among American cities. The focus of Creole New Orleans is on the development of a colonial Franco-African culture in the city, the ways that culture was influenced by the arrival of later immigrants, and the processes that led to the eventual dominance of the Anglo-American community. Essays in the book's first section focus not only on the formation of the curiously blended Franco-African culture but also on how that culture, once established, resisted change and allowed New Orleans to develop along French and African creole lines until the early nineteenth century. Jerah Johnson explores the motives and objectives of Louisiana's French founders, giving that issue the most searching analysis it has yet received. Gwendolyn Midlo Hall, in her account of the origins of New Orleans' free black population, offers a new approach to the early history of Africans in colonial Louisiana. The second part of the book focuses on the challenge of incorporating New Orleans into the United States. As Paul F. LaChance points out, the French immigrants who arrived after the Louisiana Purchase slowed the Americanization process by preserving the city's creole culture. Joesph Tregle then presents a clear, concise account of the clash that occurred between white creoles and the many white Americans who during the 1800s migrated to the city. His analysis demonstrates how race finally brought an accommodation between the white creole and American leaders. The third section centers on the evolution of the city's race relations during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Joseph Logsdon and Caryn Cossé Bell begin by tracing the ethno-cultural fault line that divided black Americans and creole through Reconstruction and the emergence of Jim Crow. Arnold R. Hirsch pursues the themes discerned by Logsdon and Bell from the turn of the century to the 1980s, examining the transformation of the city's racial politics. Collectively, these essays fill a major void in Louisiana history while making a significant contribution to the history of urbanization, ethnicity, and race relations. The book will serve as a cornerstone for future study of the history of New Orleans.

Ouidah

Author: Robin Law
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 9780821445525
Release Date: 2005-10-25
Genre: History

Ouidah, an African town in the Republic of Benin, was the principal precolonial commercial center of its region and the second-most-important town of the Dahomey kingdom. It served as a major outlet for the transatlantic slave trade. Between the seventeenth and the nineteenth centuries, Ouidah was the most important embarkation point for slaves in the region of West Africa known to outsiders as the Slave Coast. This is the first detailed study of the town’s history and of its role in the Atlantic slave trade. Ouidah is a well-documented case study of precolonial urbanism, of the evolution of a merchant community, and in particular of the growth of a group of private traders whose relations with the Dahomian monarchy grew increasingly problematic over time.

Making the Second Ghetto

Author: Arnold R. Hirsch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226342467
Release Date: 2009-04-03
Genre: Social Science

In Making the Second Ghetto, Arnold Hirsch argues that in the post-depression years Chicago was a "pioneer in developing concepts and devices" for housing segregation. Hirsch shows that the legal framework for the national urban renewal effort was forged in the heat generated by the racial struggles waged on Chicago's South Side. His chronicle of the strategies used by ethnic, political, and business interests in reaction to the great migration of southern blacks in the 1940s describes how the violent reaction of an emergent "white" population combined with public policy to segregate the city. "In this excellent, intricate, and meticulously researched study, Hirsch exposes the social engineering of the post-war ghetto."—Roma Barnes, Journal of American Studies "According to Arnold Hirsch, Chicago's postwar housing projects were a colossal exercise in moral deception. . . . [An] excellent study of public policy gone astray."—Ron Grossman, Chicago Tribune "An informative and provocative account of critical aspects of the process in [Chicago]. . . . A good and useful book."—Zane Miller, Reviews in American History "A valuable and important book."—Allan Spear, Journal of American History

The Bible As History in Pictures

Author: Keller Werner
Publisher:
ISBN: 1607964473
Release Date: 2012-05
Genre: Bibles

In this book, Dr. Werner Keller has brought the Bible alive for countless readers by telling the exciting story of how archaeologists have adventured 4000 years into the past to document events and to illuminate the backgrounds of the Scriptures. With this entirely fresh, lavishly illustrated new volume, the same distinguished author makes the world of the Bible visible as well as intelligible. He has selected a wide range of photographs-scenery, monuments, sculptures, wall paintings, excavations and the rest- to illustrate the Bible story. In his text he links the pictures to the words of the Scriptures and adds explanatory notes in such a way as to provide a unique companion to the Bible which will appeal to every reader.

Western African History

Author: Robert O. Collins
Publisher: Markus Wiener Pub
ISBN: UOM:39015062686012
Release Date: 1990
Genre: History

This volume discusses 500 years of western African history, beginning with the writings of travellers Ibn Battuta, Leo Africanus and Mungo Park. Topics covered include: religious wars; the trans-Sahara and cross-Atlantic slave trade; the French and British colonial periods; and modern times.

New Orleans in the Atlantic World

Author: William Boelhower
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317988441
Release Date: 2013-09-13
Genre: History

The thematic project ‘New Orleans in the Atlantic World’ was planned immediately after hurricane Katrina and focuses on what meteorologists have always known: the city’s identity and destiny belong to the broader Caribbean and Atlantic worlds as perhaps no other American city does. Balanced precariously between land and sea, the city’s geohistory has always interwoven diverse cultures, languages, peoples, and economies. Only with the rise of the new Atlantic Studies matrix, however, have scholars been able to fully appreciate this complex history from a multi-disciplinary, multilingual and multi-scaled perspectivism. In this book, historians, geographers, anthropologists, and cultural studies scholars bring to light the atlanticist vocation of New Orleans, and in doing so they also help to define the new field of Atlantic Studies. This book was published as a special issue of Atlantic Studies.

Creoles of Color of the Gulf South

Author: James H. Dormon
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 0870499173
Release Date: 1996
Genre: History

Eight essays explore the social and historical foundations of mixed-race people in Louisiana and along the US coast of the Gulf of Mexico, specific features of Gulf Creole culture, and ethnic and identity developments during the 20th century. The cultural features include Mardi Gras, zydeco music, and the place of the language in the larger New World French Creole. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

American Creoles

Author: Martin Munro
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
ISBN: 9781781389065
Release Date: 2012-05-25
Genre: Literary Criticism

The Francophone Caribbean and the American South are sites born of the plantation, the common matrix for the diverse nations and territories of the circum-Caribbean. This book takes as its premise that the basic configuration of the plantation, in terms of its physical layout and the social relations it created, was largely the same in the Caribbean and the American South. Essays written by leading authorities in the field examine the cultural, social, and historical affinities between the Francophone Caribbean and the American South, including Louisiana, which among the Southern states has had a quite particular attachment to France and the Francophone world. The essays focus on issues of history, language, politics and culture in various forms, notably literature, music and theatre. Considering figures as diverse as Barack Obama, Frantz Fanon, Miles Davis, James Brown, Edouard Glissant, William Faulkner, Maryse Condé and Lafcadio Hearn, the essays explore in innovative ways the notions of creole culture and creolization, terms rooted in and indicative of contact between European and African people and cultures in the Americas, and which are promoted here as some of the most productive ways for conceiving of the circum-Caribbean as a cultural and historical entity.

New Orleans After the Promises

Author: Kent B. Germany
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820329002
Release Date: 2007
Genre: History

In the 1960s and 1970s, New Orleans experienced one of the greatest transformations in its history. Its people replaced Jim Crow, fought a War on Poverty, and emerged with glittering skyscrapers, professional football, and a building so large it had to be called the Superdome. New Orleans after the Promises looks back at that era to explore how a few thousand locals tried to bring the Great Society to Dixie. With faith in God and American progress, they believed that they could conquer poverty, confront racism, establish civic order, and expand the economy. At a time when liberalism seemed to be on the wane nationally, black and white citizens in New Orleans cautiously partnered with each other and with the federal government to expand liberalism in the South. As Kent Germany examines how the civil rights, antipoverty, and therapeutic initiatives of the Great Society dovetailed with the struggles of black New Orleanians for full citizenship, he defines an emerging public/private governing apparatus that he calls the "Soft State": a delicate arrangement involving constituencies as varied as old-money civic leaders and Black Power proponents who came together to sort out the meanings of such new federal programs as Community Action, Head Start, and Model Cities. While those diverse groups struggled--violently on occasion--to influence the process of racial inclusion and the direction of economic growth, they dramatically transformed public life in one of America's oldest cities. While many wonder now what kind of city will emerge after Katrina, New Orleans after the Promises offers a detailed portrait of the complex city that developed after its last epic reconstruction.

The African World in Dialogue

Author: Teresa N. Washington
Publisher: Oya's Tornado
ISBN: 9780991073085
Release Date: 2016-11-29
Genre: Social Science

The African World in Dialogue: An Appeal to Action! is a probing and politically timely collection of essays, interviews, speeches, poetry, short stories, and proposals. These rich works illuminate the struggles, dreams, triumphs, impediments, and diversity of the contemporary African world. The African World in Dialogue contains five sections: "Listen: The Ink Speaks"; "Restitutions, Resolutions, Revolutions"; "Africanity, Education, and Technology"; "Life Lines from the Front Lines"; and "Gender, Power, and Infinite Promise." Each section brims with provocative and compelling insights from elder-warriors, wordsmiths, journalists, and academics, many of whom are also activists. The volume's contributors include Tunde Adegbola, Muhammad Ibn Bashir, Jacqueline Bediako, Charlie Braxton, Alieu Bundu, Baba A. O. Buntu, Chinweizu, Ricardo Cortez Cruz, Oyinlola Longe, Jumbe Kweku Lumumba, Morgan Miller, Asiri Odu, Chinwe Ezinna Oriji, Kevin Powell, Blair Marcus Proctor, Ishola Akindele Salami, Aseret Sin, Teresa N. Washington, and Ayoka Wiles. The book also features interviews with Hilary La Force, Mandingo, Kambale Musavili, and Prince Kuma N’dumbe. With selections designed to critique and in many cases upend conventional political thought, educational norms, fantasies of social progress, and gender myths, The African World in Dialogue challenges its audience. The book’s “Appeal to Action” is literal: Rather than offering eloquent elaborations of African world woes, The African World in Dialogue offers detailed plans and paths for emancipation and elevation that readers are urged to implement. Activists and scholars of African Studies, African American studies, Pan-Africanism, criminal justice, Black revolutionary thought and action, gender studies, sociology, and political science will find this book to be both inspirational and indispensable.

The Accidental City

Author: Lawrence N. Powell
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674065444
Release Date: 2012-04-13
Genre: History

Chronicles the history of the city from its being contended over as swampland through Louisiana's statehood in 1812, discussing its motley identities as a French village, African market town, Spanish fortress, and trade center.

Finding Octave

Author: Nick Douglas
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 1493522086
Release Date: 2013-11-13
Genre: History

"Finding Octave reveals an American history erased and forgotten, even by descendants of those who lived it. It tells of ancestors who influenced the flowering of jazz, the birth of the 15th Amendment, the love life of an empress and the legacy of Simon Bolivar--and a landmark battle to overturn segregation. And it tells the story of Octave Pavageau, the stylish, French-speaking father of eight whose heritage led to both hurtful elitism and path-breaking activism. In Finding Octave, we find Basil Crocker, mathematician, builder, and dandy. A master swordsman in a time of increasing white hostility and attacks, Crocker became New Orleans' most sought-after fencing instructor. Emile Angeletty, a black Catholic in Mississippi, resisted a Church plan to segregate worshippers. He and other Catholics started the Holy Family Parish in Natchez, and upheld more tolerant practices. Adele Pavageau was a New Orleans land magnate, Octave's aunt, and an international businesswoman. This is not another American history of black slaves and dominant whites. Finding Octave finds an America where "free people of color"--unfettered blacks, Indians and Creoles--had power and wealth that whites struggled to claim as their own. In this pre-Civil War America, blacks negotiated their own freedom from slavery. Some chose to be slaveholders themselves. Confronting the terrible truth about slavery within his family, the author uncovers an American secret. Born of the harmony of different worlds and peoples, Octave's Creole legacy is a source of enduring strength. His relatives were confident world citizens, and proud of their ancestry. They travelled widely, conducted international trade, and defined themselves as black, white or Creole as it suited them. They gravitated to city life, forming collaborative urban networks that infused New Orleans with artistic innovators, dynamic entrepreneurs, an array of social services, and crusades for social change" --

Sustaining New Orleans

Author: Barbara Eckstein
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135403324
Release Date: 2005-10-27
Genre: Literary Criticism

First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

French and Creole in Louisiana

Author: Albert Valdman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781475752786
Release Date: 2013-03-09
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Leading specialists on Cajun French and Louisiana Creole examine dialectology and sociolinguistics in this volume, the first comprehensive treatment of the linguistic situation of francophone Louisiana and its relation to the current development of French in North America outside of Quebec. Topics discussed include: language shift and code mixing speaker attitudes the role of schools and media in the maintenance of these languages and such language planning initiatives as the CODOFIL program to revive the sue of French in Louisiana. £/LIST£

Authentic New Orleans

Author: Kevin Fox Gotham
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814731864
Release Date: 2007-12-01
Genre: Business & Economics

Honorable Mention for the 2008 Robert Park Outstanding Book Award given by the ASA’s Community and Urban Sociology Section Mardi Gras, jazz, voodoo, gumbo, Bourbon Street, the French Quarter—all evoke that place that is unlike any other: New Orleans. In Authentic New Orleans, Kevin Fox Gotham explains how New Orleans became a tourist town, a spectacular locale known as much for its excesses as for its quirky Southern charm. Gotham begins in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina amid the whirlwind of speculation about the rebuilding of the city and the dread of outsiders wiping New Orleans clean of the grit that made it great. He continues with the origins of Carnival and the Mardi Gras celebration in the nineteenth century, showing how, through careful planning and promotion, the city constructed itself as a major tourist attraction. By examining various image-building campaigns and promotional strategies to disseminate a palatable image of New Orleans on a national scale Gotham ultimately establishes New Orleans as one of the originators of the mass tourism industry—which linked leisure to travel, promoted international expositions, and developed the concept of pleasure travel. Gotham shows how New Orleans was able to become one of the most popular tourist attractions in the United States, especially through the transformation of Mardi Gras into a national, even international, event. All the while Gotham is concerned with showing the difference between tourism from above and tourism from below—that is, how New Orleans’ distinctiveness is both maximized, some might say exploited, to serve the global economy of tourism as well as how local groups and individuals use tourism to preserve and anchor longstanding communal traditions.