Crossing the Next Meridian

Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 9781597269148
Release Date: 1993-06-01
Genre: Nature

In Crossing the Next Meridian, Charles F. Wilkinson, an expert on federal public lands, Native American issues, and the West's arcane water laws explains some of the core problems facing the American West now and in the years to come. He examines the outmoded ideas that pervade land use and resource allocation and argues that significant reform of Western law is needed to combat desertification and environmental decline, and to heal splintered communities. Interweaving legal history with examples of present-day consequences of the laws, both intended and unintended, Wilkinson traces the origins and development of the laws and regulations that govern mining, ranching, forestry, and water use. He relates stories of Westerners who face these issues on a day-to-day basis, and discusses what can and should be done to bring government policies in line with the reality of twentieth-century American life.

Bird on Fire

Author: Andrew Ross
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199912292
Release Date: 2011-10-27
Genre: Social Science

Phoenix, Arizona is one of America's fastest growing metropolitan regions. It is also its least sustainable one, sprawling over a thousand square miles, with a population of four and a half million, minimal rainfall, scorching heat, and an insatiable appetite for unrestrained growth and unrestricted property rights. In Bird on Fire, eminent social and cultural analyst Andrew Ross focuses on the prospects for sustainability in Phoenix--a city in the bull's eye of global warming--and also the obstacles that stand in the way. Most authors writing on sustainable cities look at places that have excellent public transit systems and relatively high density, such as Portland, Seattle, or New York. But Ross contends that if we can't change the game in fast-growing, low-density cities like Phoenix, the whole movement has a major problem. Drawing on interviews with 200 influential residents--from state legislators, urban planners, developers, and green business advocates to civil rights champions, energy lobbyists, solar entrepreneurs, and community activists--Ross argues that if Phoenix is ever to become sustainable, it will occur more through political and social change than through technological fixes. Ross explains how Arizona's increasingly xenophobic immigration laws, science-denying legislature, and growth-at-all-costs business ethic have perpetuated social injustice and environmental degradation. But he also highlights the positive changes happening in Phoenix, in particular the Gila River Indian Community's successful struggle to win back its water rights, potentially shifting resources away from new housing developments to producing healthy local food for the people of the Phoenix Basin. Ross argues that this victory may serve as a new model for how green democracy can work, redressing the claims of those who have been aggrieved in a way that creates long-term benefits for all. Bird on Fire offers a compelling take on one of the pressing issues of our time--finding pathways to sustainability at a time when governments are dismally failing in their responsibility to address climate change.

Wilderburbs

Author: Lincoln Bramwell
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295805580
Release Date: 2015-04-28
Genre: History

Since the 1950s, the housing developments in the West that historian Lincoln Bramwell calls �wilderburbs� have offered residents both the pleasures of living in nature and the creature comforts of the suburbs. Remote from cities but still within commuting distance, nestled next to lakes and rivers or in forests and deserts, and often featuring spectacular views of public lands, wilderburbs celebrate the natural beauty of the American West and pose a vital threat to it. Wilderburbs tells the story of how roads and houses and water development have transformed the rural landscape in the West. Bramwell introduces readers to developers, homeowners, and government regulators, all of whom have faced unexpected environmental problems in designing and building wilderburb communities, including unpredictable water supplies, threats from wildfires, and encounters with wildlife. By looking at wilderburbs in the West, especially those in Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico, Bramwell uncovers the profound environmental consequences of Americans� desire to live in the wilderness.

The People Are Dancing Again

Author: Charles Wilkinson
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295802015
Release Date: 2012-02-01
Genre: History

The history of the Siletz is in many ways the history of all Indian tribes in America: a story of heartache, perseverance, survival, and revival. It began in a resource-rich homeland thousands of years ago and today finds a vibrant, modern community with a deeply held commitment to tradition. The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians�twenty-seven tribes speaking at least ten languages�were brought together on the Oregon Coast through treaties with the federal government in 1853�55. For decades after, the Siletz people lost many traditional customs, saw their languages almost wiped out, and experienced poverty, killing diseases, and humiliation. Again and again, the federal government took great chunks of the magnificent, timber-rich tribal homeland, a reservation of 1.1 million acres reaching a full 100 miles north to south on the Oregon Coast. By 1956, the tribe had been �terminated� under the Western Oregon Indian Termination Act, selling off the remaining land, cutting off federal health and education benefits, and denying tribal status. Poverty worsened, and the sense of cultural loss deepened. The Siletz people refused to give in. In 1977, after years of work and appeals to Congress, they became the second tribe in the nation to have its federal status, its treaty rights, and its sovereignty restored. Hand-in-glove with this federal recognition of the tribe has come a recovery of some land--several hundred acres near Siletz and 9,000 acres of forest--and a profound cultural revival. This remarkable account, written by one of the nation�s most respected experts in tribal law and history, is rich in Indian voices and grounded in extensive research that includes oral tradition and personal interviews. It is a book that not only provides a deep and beautifully written account of the history of the Siletz, but reaches beyond region and tribe to tell a story that will inform the way all of us think about the past. Watch the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEtAIGxp6pc

Who Controls Public Lands

Author: Christopher McGrory Klyza
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807862537
Release Date: 2000-11-09
Genre: Political Science

In this historical and comparative study, Christopher McGrory Klyza explores why land-management policies in mining, forestry, and grazing have followed different paths and explains why public-lands policy in general has remained virtually static over time. According to Klyza, understanding the different philosophies that gave rise to each policy regime is crucial to reforming public-lands policy in the future. Klyza begins by delineating how prevailing policy philosophies over the course of the last century have shaped each of the three land-use patterns he discusses. In mining, the model was economic liberalism, which mandated privatization of public lands; in forestry, it was technocratic utilitarianism, which called for government ownership and management of land; and in grazing, it was interest-group liberalism, in which private interests determined government policy. Each of these philosophies held sway in the years during which policy for that particular resource was formed, says Klyza, and continues to animate it even today.

On Private Property

Author: Eric T. Freyfogle
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807044164
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Business & Economics

A fresh legal argument on what it means to own land, navigating issues of eminent domain, sprawl, and conservation Private property poses a great dilemma in American culture. We revere the institution and are quick to protect private-property rights, yet we are troubled when landowners cause harm to their neighbors and communities, especially when new development fuels sprawl and degrades the environment. Recent Supreme Court cases and new state laws around eminent domain have generated great controversy, and yet many people are unsure where they stand on this issue. In this wide-ranging inquiry, law professor Eric Freyfogle explores the inner workings of the familiar but poorly understood institution of private property. He identifies the three threats it currently faces: government mismanagement, the recently reinvigorated property rights movement, and conservation groups’ efforts to buy tracts of land in order to protect them. He then offers a solution in the middle ground between the extreme sides of these debates. In On Private Property, Freyfogle gives glimpses of landownership’s surprising past, revealing its complex links to liberty and ultimately showing why private property rights must remain consistent with a community’s overall good. In conclusion, Freyfogle constructs piece by piece a provocative new vision of landownership, at once respectful of private interests yet responsive to communal needs. “Freyfogle's new book, which probably should have been titled "Roll Over, John Locke," is just what the public debate over property rights needs. Straight talk, and an invitation to open a conversation about the real issues.” —Joseph L. Sax, author of Playing Darts with a Rembrandt: Public and Private Rights in Cultural Treasures “A fresh perspective and penetrating legal and historical analysis of an issue that will continue to be in the forefront of land policy in the 21st century.” —Anthony Flint, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, author of This Land: The Battle over Sprawl and the Future of America “In a work that eschews easy slogans, Eric Freyfogle proves the truth about American property rights—that original intent, early court opinions, and the realities of modern society all mandate that ownership brings with it weighty but reasonable responsibilities to the larger community. This beautifully-articulated book, at once bold and thoughtful, is bound to become a classic in American constitutional and property law.” —Charles Wilkinson, Distinguished University Professor and Moses Lasky Professor of Law at the University of Colorado and author of Crossing the Next Meridian: Land, Water, and the Future of the West

Staking Out the Terrain

Author: Jeanne Nienaber Clarke
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791429458
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Political Science

An original approach to the study of bureaucratic behavior that formulates a model of agency power supported by analysis of seven federal natural resource agencies.

Economic Analysis of Property Rights

Author: Yoram Barzel
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521597137
Release Date: 1997-04-13
Genre: Business & Economics

This study offers a unified theoretical structure to analyze exchange, formation of economic rights, and organization. The cost of measuring accurately all assets' attributes is prohibitive. Therefore, rights are never fully delineated and others (using theft, adverse selection, free riding, and shirking) may appropriate one's assets. The central question is how people allocate resources and organize their activities to maximize the value of their rights. The approach emphasizes nonmarket constraints, but is also applicable to market economies. It is useful for analyzing allocations within organizations as well as allocation by voting and charity. Chapters have been extended for this second edition and a new chapter devoted to the firm has been added.

Water and Climate in the Western United States

Author: William M. Lewis
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: UOM:39015056899688
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Science

Although developed intensively as a resource for more than a century, the use and management of water in the Western United States are far from being settled matters. With papers from researchers and managers representing the multiple viewpoints of climate forecasting, water management, water law, and water allocation, Water and Climate in the Western United States demonstrates that new technologies and a new scientific understanding of the water cycle are developing. This new insight is emerging at a time when demands for water are expanding and changing as traditional policies and institutions are coming under severe criticism for their inadequacy. The degree to which vagaries of climate can be anticipated and countered--through better predictions, better supervision, and reformed legal and management systems for allocating water--are explored thoroughly by the contributors in the context of a long-term climate record and changes in water use. The papers in this volume highlight both the opportunity and necessity for change in human management of water, the West's most limited resource. Unique in its full, integrated coverage, Water and Climate in the Western United States will appeal to academics and policymakers interested in water supply and management questions as well as climate prediction.

Innovation and Incentives

Author: Suzanne Scotchmer
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262195151
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Law

The economics of intellectual property and R&D incentives explained in a balanced, accessible mixture of institutional details and theory.

Blood Struggle

Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393051498
Release Date: 2005-01
Genre: Social Science

"The story of the extraordinary gains by Indian tribes over the second half of the twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.

Fire on the Plateau

Author: Charles F. Wilkinson
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610912454
Release Date: 2004-09-15
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

"This book recounts my journey through the Colorado Plateau, a journey through place and time and self.... During my explorations of more than three decades, I found a land that sears into my heart and soul, a place that has taught me and changed me. I also discovered a land of conflict and endurance, a land that has given birth to one of the great chapters in American history." --from the Introduction The Colorado Plateau, stretching across four states and covering nearly 80 million acres, is one of the most unique and spectacular landscapes in the world. Remote, rugged, and dry -- at once forlorn and glorious -- it is a separate place, a place with its own distinctive landscape, history, and future.In Fire on the Plateau, legal scholar and writer Charles Wilkinson relates the powerful story of how, over the past thirty years, he has been drawn ever more deeply into the redrock country and Indian societies of the Colorado Plateau. His work in the early 1970s as staff attorney for the newly formed Native American Rights Fund brought him into close contact with Navajo and Hopi people. His growing friendships with American Indians and increasing understanding of their cultures, along with his longstanding scholarship and experiences on federal public lands, led him to delve into the complicated history of the region.Wilkinson examines that history -- the sometimes violent conflicts between indigenous populations and more recent settlers, the political machinations by industry and the legal establishment, the contentious disputes over resources and land use -- and provides a compelling look at the epic events that have shaped the region. From centuries of habitation by native peoples to Mormon settlement, from the "Big Build-Up" of the post-World War II era to the increased environmental awareness of recent years, he explores the conquests of tribes and lands that have taken place, and the ways in which both have endured.Throughout, Wilkinson uses his own personal experiences as a lawyer working with Indian people and his heartfelt insights about a land that he grew to love to tie together the threads of the story. Fire on the Plateau is a vital and dynamic work that is sure to strike a chord with anyone interested in the past or future of the American Southwest.

Dividing the waters

Author: William Andrew Blomquist
Publisher: Ics Pr
ISBN: STANFORD:36105002226350
Release Date: 1992-10-01
Genre: Business & Economics

An environmentally aware proposal for maintaining natural resources suggests using a local, businesslike approach as opposed to government regulations, using the water management of Los Angeles as a model for this new way of thinking.