Crow Dog s Case

Author: Sidney L. Harring
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521467152
Release Date: 1994-02-25
Genre: History

Crow Dog's Case is the first social history of American Indians' role in the making of American law. The book sheds new light on Native American struggles for sovereignty and justice in nineteenth century America. This "century of dishonor," a time when American Indians' lands were lost and their tribes reduced to reservations, provoked a wide variety of tribal responses. Some of the more successful responses were in the area of law, forcing the newly independent American legal order to create a unique place for Indian tribes in American law.

Crimes of the Centuries Notorious Crimes Criminals and Criminal Trials in American History 3 volumes

Author: Steven Chermak Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781610695947
Release Date: 2016-01-25
Genre: True Crime

This multivolume resource is the most extensive reference of its kind, offering a comprehensive summary of the misdeeds, perpetrators, and victims involved in the most memorable crime events in American history. • Supports national standards curriculum • Offers an extensive selection of primary documents to encourage critical thinking and reading practice • Includes photos and illustrations to help bring content to life • Features sidebars with illuminating crime facts and interesting anecdotes

The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in Nineteenth Century America

Author: Nan Goodman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781317042976
Release Date: 2017-05-12
Genre: Literary Criticism

Nineteenth-century America witnessed some of the most important and fruitful areas of intersection between the law and humanities, as people began to realize that the law, formerly confined to courts and lawyers, might also find expression in a variety of ostensibly non-legal areas such as painting, poetry, fiction, and sculpture. Bringing together leading researchers from law schools and humanities departments, this Companion touches on regulatory, statutory, and common law in nineteenth-century America and encompasses judges, lawyers, legislators, litigants, and the institutions they inhabited (courts, firms, prisons). It will serve as a reference for specific information on a variety of law- and humanities-related topics as well as a guide to understanding how the two disciplines developed in tandem in the long nineteenth century.

Lone Wolf V Hitchcock

Author: Blue Clark
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803264011
Release Date: 1999
Genre: History

Landmark court cases in the history of formal U.S. relations with Indian tribes are Corn Tassel, Standing Bear, Crow Dog, and Lone Wolf. Each exemplifies a problem or a process as the United States defined and codified its politics toward Indians. The importance of the Lone Wolf case of 1903 resides in its enunciation of the "plenary power" doctrine?that the United States could unilaterally act in violation of its own treaties and that Congress could dispose of land recognized by treaty as belonging to individual tribes. In 1892 the Kiowas and related Comanche and Plains Apache groups were pressured into agreeing to divide their land into allotments under the terms of the Dawes Act of 1887. Lone Wolf, a Kiowa band leader, sued to halt the land division, citing the treaties signed with the United States immediately after the Civil War. In 1902 the case reached the Supreme Court, which found that Congress could overturn the treaties through the doctrine of plenary power. As he recounts the Lone Wolf case, Clark reaches beyond the legal decision to describe the Kiowa tribe itself and its struggles to cope with Euro-American pressure on its society, attitudes, culture, economic system, and land base. The story of the case therefore also becomes the history of the tribe in the late nineteenth century. The Lone Wolf case also necessarily becomes a study of the Dawes Allotment Act of 1887 in operation; under the terms of the Dawes Act and successor legislation, almost two-thirds of Indian lands passed out of their hands within a generation. Understanding how this happened in the case of the Kiowa permits a nuanced view of the well-intentioned but ultimately disastrous allotment effort.

Indigenous Intellectuals

Author: Kiara M. Vigil
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107070813
Release Date: 2015-07-15
Genre: History

Examines the literary output of four influential American Indian intellectuals who challenged conceptions of identity at the turn of the twentieth century.

Native American Sovereignty

Author: John R. Wunder
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780815336297
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Law

First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Parading Through History

Author: Frederick E. Hoxie
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521485223
Release Date: 1995
Genre: History

Exploring the links between the nineteenth-century nomadic life of the Crow Indians and their modern existence, this book demonstrates that dislocation and conquest by outsiders drew the Crows together by testing their ability to adapt their traditions to new conditions.

Lingua Franca

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015077158544
Release Date: 1993
Genre: Education, Higher


The Nation

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105005532986
Release Date: 1994-01
Genre:


The Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation 1877 1900

Author: Orlan Svingen
Publisher:
ISBN: 0870814869
Release Date: 1997-12-01
Genre: Political Science

Following the Sioux War of 1876, thousands of Northern Cheyenne Indians surrendered to the federal government and all but a few were moved from their homes to a reservation in present-day Oklahoma. The settlement created by the few who stayed sparked years of conflict and bloodshed between the North