Cultural Anthropology

Author: Emily A. Schultz
Publisher:
ISBN: 0199028524
Release Date: 2018-03-06
Genre:

Drawing on the authors' fieldwork experience, this text explores how cultural creativity, human agency, and the material conditions of everyday life interact to shape cultural practices. Discussions of ongoing controversies - including tribalism vs. globalization and increasing inequalitybetween "have" and "have not" regions - show how cultural anthropologists can tackle the world's most pressing social problems through their specialized knowledge and skills.

Cultural Anthropology A Perspective on the Human Condition

Author: CTI Reviews
Publisher: Cram101 Textbook Reviews
ISBN: 9781497025035
Release Date: 2016-09-26
Genre: Education

Facts101 is your complete guide to Cultural Anthropology, A Perspective on the Human Condition. In this book, you will learn topics such as What Is Ethnographic Fieldwork?, How Has Anthropological Thinking about Cultural Diversity Changed over ..., What Is Human Language?, and How Do We Make Meaning? plus much more. With key features such as key terms, people and places, Facts101 gives you all the information you need to prepare for your next exam. Our practice tests are specific to the textbook and we have designed tools to make the most of your limited study time.

SCHULTZ EMILY

Author: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY : A. PERSPECTIVE ON THE HUMAN CONDITION.
Publisher:
ISBN: OCLC:977890352
Release Date:
Genre:


How to Think Like an Anthropologist

Author: Matthew Engelke
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400889525
Release Date: 2018-02-13
Genre: Social Science

From an award-winning anthropologist, a lively accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to the subject What is anthropology? What can it tell us about the world? Why, in short, does it matter? For well over a century, cultural anthropologists have circled the globe, from Papua New Guinea to suburban England and from China to California, uncovering surprising facts and insights about how humans organize their lives and articulate their values. In the process, anthropology has done more than any other discipline to reveal what culture means--and why it matters. By weaving together examples and theories from around the world, Matthew Engelke provides a lively, accessible, and at times irreverent introduction to anthropology, covering a wide range of classic and contemporary approaches, subjects, and practitioners. Presenting a set of memorable cases, he encourages readers to think deeply about some of the key concepts with which anthropology tries to make sense of the world—from culture and nature to authority and blood. Along the way, he shows why anthropology matters: not only because it helps us understand other cultures and points of view but also because, in the process, it reveals something about ourselves and our own cultures, too.

Vita

Author: João Biehl
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520951464
Release Date: 2013-05-01
Genre: Social Science

Zones of social abandonment are emerging everywhere in Brazil’s big cities—places like Vita, where the unwanted, the mentally ill, the sick, and the homeless are left to die. This haunting, unforgettable story centers on a young woman named Catarina, increasingly paralyzed and said to be mad, living out her time at Vita. Anthropologist João Biehl leads a detective-like journey to know Catarina; to unravel the cryptic, poetic words that are part of the "dictionary" she is compiling; and to trace the complex network of family, medicine, state, and economy in which her abandonment and pathology took form. An instant classic, Vita has been widely acclaimed for its bold fieldwork, theoretical innovation, and literary force. Reflecting on how Catarina’s life story continues, this updated edition offers the reader a powerful new afterword and gripping new photographs following Biehl and Eskerod’s return to Vita. Anthropology at its finest, Vita is essential reading for anyone who is grappling with how to understand the conditions of life, thought, and ethics in the contemporary world.

The Trouble with Human Nature

Author: Elizabeth D. Whitaker
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9781315451725
Release Date: 2017-02-03
Genre: Social Science

The Trouble with Human Nature brings together biological and cross-cultural evidence to critically examine common preconceptions and challenge popular assumptions about human nature. It sets out to counter genetic and evolutionary myths about human variation and behavior, drawing on both biological and cultural anthropology, as well as from other disciplines including psychology, economics, and sociology. The chapters address the interrelated topics of health and disease, gender and other differences, and violence and conflict. The analysis calls into question the presumed natural foundation for social inequalities and sheds light on both the constraints and possibilities inherent in the human condition. This book provides students of human diversity and evolution with an excellent resource to better approach questions relating to human nature. It will also be of interest to those taking courses in social, cultural, and biological anthropology, as well as public health, medical anthropology, sociology, gender studies, psychology, and kinship studies.

Cultural Anthropology Making Sense of the Social Sciences Pack

Author: Emily A. Schultz
Publisher:
ISBN: 0199006776
Release Date: 2012-08-22
Genre:

a href="http://www.oupcanada.com/ebrochure/schultz/index.html"img src="/images/hed/closer_look_btn.gif"/aNow in its second Canadian edition, Cultural Anthropology: A Perspective on the Human Condition introduces students to the history, methods, and theoretical approaches of the discipline. Drawing on experiences from their own fieldwork and the work of other top researchers, the authors explore howcultural creativity, human agency, and the material conditions of everyday life interact to shape cultural practices. Discussions of ongoing controversies - including tribalism vs globalization, the vulnerability of transborder citizens, attempts to use cultural relativism as an excuse for humanrights violations, and increasing inequality between 'have' and 'have not' regions - show how cultural anthropologists can apply their knowledge and skills to tackle the world's most pressing social problems. Together, these stories and discussions reveal stunning diversity and surprising similarityin the ways individuals from different cultures perceive, bring meaning to, and transform their worlds.

Culture Sketches

Author: Holly Peters-Golden
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
ISBN: 9780077433031
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Electronic books

Ideal for any cultural anthropology course, this brief collection of ethnographic case studies exposes students to 15 different cultures. The groups selected are peoples whose traditional cultures are uniquely their own. Each has distinctive patterns and practices; each has faced the challenge of an encroaching world, with differing results. Moreover, they often provide the prime illustrations of important concepts in introductory anthropology course including Azande witchcraft, Ju/'hoansi egalitarianism, Trobriand kula exchange, and Minangkabau matriliny. As such, this volume can stand alone.

The Challenge of Epistemology

Author: Christina Toren
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857455168
Release Date: 2011-10-30
Genre: Social Science

Epistemology poses particular problems for anthropologists whose task it is to understand manifold ways of being human. Through their work, anthropologists often encounter people whose ideas concerning the nature and foundations of knowledge are at odds with their own. Going right to the heart of anthropological theory and method, this volume discusses issues that have vexed practicing anthropologists for a long time. The authors are by no means in agreement with one another as to where the answers might lie. Some are primarily concerned with the clarity and theoretical utility of analytical categories across disciplines; others are more inclined to push ethnographic analysis to its limits in an effort to demonstrate what kind of sense it can make. All are aware of the much-wanted differences that good ethnography can make in explaining the human sciences and philosophy. The contributors show a continued commitment to ethnography as a profoundly radical intellectual endeavor that goes to the very roots of inquiry into what it is to be human, and, to anthropology as a comparative project that should be central to any attempt to understand who we are.

Adaptation and Human Behavior

Author: Napoleon Chagnon
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781351329187
Release Date: 2017-09-08
Genre: Social Science

This volume presents state-of-the-art empirical studies working in a paradigm that has become known as human behavioral ecology. The emergence of this approach in anthropology was marked by publication by Aldine in 1979 of an earlier collection of studies edited by Chagnon and Irons entitled Evolutionary Biology and Human Social Behavior: An Anthropological Perspective. During the two decades that have passed since then, this innovative approach has matured and expanded into new areas that are explored here. The book opens with an introductory chapter by Chagnon and Irons tracing the origins of human behavioral ecology and its subsequent development. Subsequent chapters, written by both younger scholars and established researchers, cover a wide range of societies and topics organ-ized into six sections. The first section includes two chapters that provide historical background on the development of human behavioral ecology and com-pare it to two complementary approaches in the study of evolution and human behavior, evolutionary psychology, and dual inheritance theory. The second section includes five studies of mating efforts in a variety of societies from South America and Africa. The third section covers parenting, with five studies on soci-eties from Africa, Asia, and North America. The fourth section breaks somewhat with the tradition in human behavioral ecology by focusing on one particularly problematic issue, the demographic transition, using data from Europe, North America, and Asia. The fifth section includes studies of cooperation and helping behaviors, using data from societies in Micronesia and South America. The sixth and final section consists of a single chapter that places the volume in a broader critical and comparative context. The contributions to this volume demonstrate, with a high degree of theoretical and methodological sophistication--the maturity and freshness of this new paradigm in the study of human behavior. The volume will be of interest to anthropologists and other professions working on the study of cross-cultural human behavior.

Culture and the Human Body

Author: John W. Burton
Publisher: Waveland PressInc
ISBN: IND:30000085297095
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Social Science

"In the course of human prehistory and continuing to the present day, culture has played a prominent role in transforming the human form. From birth to death, the body serves as a medium and metaphor of cultural expression. This book provides a broadly comparative perspective on the many and varied ways in which the human body has been sculpted and transformed by particular cultural traditions and argues that in significant ways, the human body has transcended the laws of natural selection. To appreciate the human body is to acknowledge the various ways in which it has become a cultural artifact rather than a purely natural phenomenon."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Patients and Healers in the Context of Culture

Author: Arthur Kleinman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520045114
Release Date: 1981-08-17
Genre: Medical

Kleinman, a psychiatrist, trained in anthropology, reports on his studies of health care in Taiwan. He describes his observations of clinical interviews between various medical practitioner, folk-healers, temple medicine men, and Chinese-style and Western-style physicians and their patients. He stress the importance of adopting the proper cultural perspective, making ones interpretations within that framework.

Pain as Human Experience

Author: Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520075129
Release Date: 1994-11-14
Genre: Medical

Chronic pain challenges the central tenet of biomedicine: that objective knowledge of the human body and mind is possible apart from subjective experience and social context. Sufferers, finding that chronic pain alters every aspect of life, often become frustrated and distrust a profession seemingly unable to explain or effectively treat their illness. The authors of this innovative volume offer an entirely different, ethnographic approach, searching out more effective ways to describe and analyze the human context of pain. How can we analyze a mode of experience that appears to the pain sufferer as an unmediated fact of the body and is yet so resistant to language? With case studies drawn from anthropological investigations of chronic pain sufferers and pain clinics in the northeastern United States, the authors explore the great divide between the culturally shaped language of suffering and the traditional language of medical and psychological theorizing. They argue that the representation of experience in local social worlds is a central challenge to the human sciences and to ethnographic writing, and that meeting that challenge is also crucial to the refiguring of pain in medical discourse and health policy debates. Anthropologists, scholars from the medical social sciences and humanities, and many general readers will be interested in Pain as Human Experience. In addition, behavioral medicine and pain specialists, psychiatrists, and primary care practitioners will find much that is relevant to their work in this book.