Daniel Bell

Author: Malcolm Waters
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134845569
Release Date: 2002-01-04
Genre: Social Science

Daniel Bell is perhaps the most famous sociologist of his generation. He has been hailed as the prophet of the emergence of a new society, the postindustrial society, and as one of the leading conservative critics of contemporary culture. In this invaluable introduction, Malcolm Waters presents Bell's arguments clearly and fairly, as well as noting the problems with his work. The three books that have made Bell famous, The End of Ideology, The Coming of Post-Capitalism are drawn upon, as well as his lesser known works on education and social forecasting. A thoroughly comprehensive account of a key, albeit highly controversial, contemporary sociological figure.

The End of Ideology

Author: Daniel Bell
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674004264
Release Date: 1962
Genre: Social Science

This work first argued that the older humanistic ideologies from the 19th and early 20th centuries were exhausted, and that new parochial ideologies would arise. This 2000 edition argues that there is a resumption of history with the end of communism and the return of traditional conflicts.

Daniel Bell and the Decline of Intellectual Radicalism

Author: Howard Brick
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299105504
Release Date: 1986
Genre: History

What causes a generation of intellectuals to switch its political allegiances—in particular, to move from the opposition to the mainstream? In U.S. history, it is the experience of the “Old Left” intellectuals, who swung from avowal of socialism or Communism in the 1930s to apology for American liberalism in the 1950s, that raises this question pointedly. In this highly original and broadsweeping study, Howard Brick focuses on the career of Daniel Bell as an illustrative case of political transformation, combining intellectual history, biography, and the history of sociology to explain Bell's emerging thought in terms of the tensions between socialists and sociological theory. The resulting work will be of compelling interest to Marxists and American intellectual historians, to sociologists, and to all students of twentieth-century American thought and culture. Daniel Bell's route to political reconciliation was a tortuous one. While it is common wisdom to cite World War II as the force that welded national unity and brought Depression-era radicals to an appreciation of democratic institutions, the war actually turned the young Bell to the left. Opposing the centralized power of American business and military elites at war's end, Bell shared the “new radicalism” that infused Dwight MacDonald's Politics Magazine and motivated C. Wright Mills' early work. Nonetheless, by the early 1950s, Bell had declared the demise of American socialism and endorsed the welfare reforms of the Fair Deal. Brick's study finds, however, that the “new radicalism” of the mid-1940s helped to shape Bell's mature perspective, giving it a richness and critical edge often unrecognized. Brick finds that the heritage of modernism, as manifested in social theory, knit together the process of political transformation, combining disdain for the false promises of liberal progress, estrangement from society at large, and reconciliation with a reality perceived to be full of unconquerable tensions. Brick locates the foundations of Bell's mature social theory in the historical context of his early work—particularly in the political concessions made by the social-democratic movement, in the face of the Cold War, to the reconstruction of capitalist order in the West. The crucial turning point, in World politics as in Bell's thinking, can be located in the years 1947–49. After that point, the different strands of Bell's thinking came together to represent the contradictions in the perspective of a social democrat trapped by the “iron cage” of capitalism, who saw in his political accommodation both the road to progress and the rupture of his hopes. This peculiar paradigm, shaped by the experiences of deradicalization, lies at the heart of Daniel Bell's social theory, Brick finds. At the present critical point in American history, as a new generation of leftist intellectuals undergoes a process similar to that of Bell's generation, Brick's work will be especially important in understanding the historical phenomenon of deradicalization.

Key Ideas in Sociology

Author: Martin Slattery
Publisher: Nelson Thornes
ISBN: 0748765654
Release Date: 2003-01
Genre: Social Science

Key Ideas in Sociology provides a tour d'horizon of the great sociological thinkers of the last two centuries -- their lives, their main ideas, and their influence on further thinking and practice in sociology. Fifty key thinkers in sociology are represented, both to give a sense of history to the development of the discipline and to exemplify the range of issues that have been covered. Each essay concludes with an annotated Suggested Readings list, and a General Bibliography is also provided.

Marxian Socialism in the United States

Author: Daniel Bell
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801483093
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Political Science

First published in 1952, this work is widely considered a classic account of the American Left. In his introduction to this Cornell paperback edition, Michael Kazin reevaluates the book, viewing it in the context of subsequent work on the subject and of the recent history of the Left itself.

The Winding Passage

Author: Daniel A. Bell
Publisher: University Press of Amer
ISBN: 0819141429
Release Date: 1984
Genre: Social Science

Originally published by Abt Books in 1980, this book brings together most of Daniel Bell's best work in his second career as a sociologist. The essays deal with a diverse range of topics including technology and culture, religion and personal identity, the intellectual and society, and the validity of the concept of class.

Theories of the Information Society

Author: Frank Webster
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134134786
Release Date: 2007-01-24
Genre: Social Science

Coping in an era of information flows, of virtual relationships and breakneck change poses challenges to one and all. In Theories of the Information Society Frank Webster makes sense of the information explosion, taking a sceptical look at what thinkers mean when they refer to the 'Information Society' and critically examines the major post-war theories and approaches to informational development. This third edition brings the book right up to date with both new theoretical work and, social and technological changes (such as the rapid growth of the Internet and accelerated globalization), reassessing the work of key theorists in light of these changes. This book is essential reading for students of contemporary social theory and anybody interested in social and technological change in the post-war era. It addresses issues of central concern to students of sociology, politics, communications, information science, cultural studies, computing and librarianship.

Key Sociological Thinkers

Author: Rob Stones
Publisher: Palgrave
ISBN: 9781349931668
Release Date: 2017-05-05
Genre: Social Science

This is a stimulating guide to the lives, works and legacies of 24 of the most influential thinkers in sociology. The book gives a clear and contextualized introduction to classical and contemporary theory, illuminating complex ideas with examples from the everyday world. It continues to be an essential text for all students of sociological theory.

The Cultural Contradictions Of Capitalism

Author: Daniel Bell
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465014992
Release Date: 1996-10-18
Genre: Social Science

With a new afterword by the author, this classic analysis of Western liberal capitalist society contends that capitalism—and the culture it creates—harbors the seeds of its own downfall by creating a need among successful people for personal gratification—a need that corrodes the work ethic that led to their success in the first place. With the end of the Cold War and the emergence of a new world order, this provocative manifesto is more relevant than ever.

The Power Elite

Author: C. Wright Mills
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199756333
Release Date: 2000-02-17
Genre: Social Science

First published in 1956, The Power Elite stands as a contemporary classic of social science and social criticism. C. Wright Mills examines and critiques the organization of power in the United States, calling attention to three firmly interlocked prongs of power: the military, corporate, and political elite. The Power Elite can be read as a good account of what was taking place in America at the time it was written, but its underlying question of whether America is as democratic in practice as it is in theory continues to matter very much today. What The Power Elite informed readers of in 1956 was how much the organization of power in America had changed during their lifetimes, and Alan Wolfe's astute afterword to this new edition brings us up to date, illustrating how much more has changed since then. Wolfe sorts out what is helpful in Mills' book and which of his predictions have not come to bear, laying out the radical changes in American capitalism, from intense global competition and the collapse of communism to rapid technological transformations and ever changing consumer tastes. The Power Elite has stimulated generations of readers to think about the kind of society they have and the kind of society they might want, and deserves to be read by every new generation.

Beyond Liberal Democracy

Author: Daniel A. Bell
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400827469
Release Date: 2009-01-10
Genre: Philosophy

Is liberal democracy appropriate for East Asia? In this provocative book, Daniel Bell argues for morally legitimate alternatives to Western-style liberal democracy in the region. Beyond Liberal Democracy, which continues the author's influential earlier work, is divided into three parts that correspond to the three main hallmarks of liberal democracy--human rights, democracy, and capitalism. These features have been modified substantially during their transmission to East Asian societies that have been shaped by nonliberal practices and values. Bell points to the dangers of implementing Western-style models and proposes alternative justifications and practices that may be more appropriate for East Asian societies. If human rights, democracy, and capitalism are to take root and produce beneficial outcomes in East Asia, Bell argues, they must be adjusted to contemporary East Asian political and economic realities and to the values of nonliberal East Asian political traditions such as Confucianism and Legalism. Local knowledge is therefore essential for realistic and morally informed contributions to debates on political reform in the region, as well as for mutual learning and enrichment of political theories. Beyond Liberal Democracy is indispensable reading for students and scholars of political theory, Asian studies, and human rights, as well as anyone concerned about China's political and economic future and how Western governments and organizations should engage with China.

Daniel Bell and the Decline of Intellectual Radicalism

Author: Howard Brick
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299105504
Release Date: 1986
Genre: History

What causes a generation of intellectuals to switch its political allegiances—in particular, to move from the opposition to the mainstream? In U.S. history, it is the experience of the “Old Left” intellectuals, who swung from avowal of socialism or Communism in the 1930s to apology for American liberalism in the 1950s, that raises this question pointedly. In this highly original and broadsweeping study, Howard Brick focuses on the career of Daniel Bell as an illustrative case of political transformation, combining intellectual history, biography, and the history of sociology to explain Bell's emerging thought in terms of the tensions between socialists and sociological theory. The resulting work will be of compelling interest to Marxists and American intellectual historians, to sociologists, and to all students of twentieth-century American thought and culture. Daniel Bell's route to political reconciliation was a tortuous one. While it is common wisdom to cite World War II as the force that welded national unity and brought Depression-era radicals to an appreciation of democratic institutions, the war actually turned the young Bell to the left. Opposing the centralized power of American business and military elites at war's end, Bell shared the “new radicalism” that infused Dwight MacDonald's Politics Magazine and motivated C. Wright Mills' early work. Nonetheless, by the early 1950s, Bell had declared the demise of American socialism and endorsed the welfare reforms of the Fair Deal. Brick's study finds, however, that the “new radicalism” of the mid-1940s helped to shape Bell's mature perspective, giving it a richness and critical edge often unrecognized. Brick finds that the heritage of modernism, as manifested in social theory, knit together the process of political transformation, combining disdain for the false promises of liberal progress, estrangement from society at large, and reconciliation with a reality perceived to be full of unconquerable tensions. Brick locates the foundations of Bell's mature social theory in the historical context of his early work—particularly in the political concessions made by the social-democratic movement, in the face of the Cold War, to the reconstruction of capitalist order in the West. The crucial turning point, in World politics as in Bell's thinking, can be located in the years 1947–49. After that point, the different strands of Bell's thinking came together to represent the contradictions in the perspective of a social democrat trapped by the “iron cage” of capitalism, who saw in his political accommodation both the road to progress and the rupture of his hopes. This peculiar paradigm, shaped by the experiences of deradicalization, lies at the heart of Daniel Bell's social theory, Brick finds. At the present critical point in American history, as a new generation of leftist intellectuals undergoes a process similar to that of Bell's generation, Brick's work will be especially important in understanding the historical phenomenon of deradicalization.

A Confucian Constitutional Order

Author: Jiang Qing
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400844845
Release Date: 2012-10-28
Genre: Political Science

As China continues to transform itself, many assume that the nation will eventually move beyond communism and adopt a Western-style democracy. But could China develop a unique form of government based on its own distinct traditions? Jiang Qing--China's most original, provocative, and controversial Confucian political thinker--says yes. In this book, he sets out a vision for a Confucian constitutional order that offers a compelling alternative to both the status quo in China and to a Western-style liberal democracy. A Confucian Constitutional Order is the most detailed and systematic work on Confucian constitutionalism to date. Jiang argues against the democratic view that the consent of the people is the main source of political legitimacy. Instead, he presents a comprehensive way to achieve humane authority based on three sources of political legitimacy, and he derives and defends a proposal for a tricameral legislature that would best represent the Confucian political ideal. He also puts forward proposals for an institution that would curb the power of parliamentarians and for a symbolic monarch who would embody the historical and transgenerational identity of the state. In the latter section of the book, four leading liberal and socialist Chinese critics--Joseph Chan, Chenyang Li, Wang Shaoguang, and Bai Tongdong--critically evaluate Jiang's theories and Jiang gives detailed responses to their views. A Confucian Constitutional Order provides a new standard for evaluating political progress in China and enriches the dialogue of possibilities available to this rapidly evolving nation. This book will fascinate students and scholars of Chinese politics, and is essential reading for anyone concerned about China's political future.

Key Ideas in Sociology

Author: Peter Kivisto
Publisher: Pine Forge Press
ISBN: 9780761988236
Release Date: 2003-12-02
Genre: Social Science

Key Ideas in Sociology is the only compact and portable book for undergraduate readers that links issues regarding post-modern society to the ideas and individuals that gave rise to sociological thinking in the late 19th century. This is the ideal text for idea and history oriented introductory sociology courses.