Decline of Donnish Dominion

Author: A. H. Halsey
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198279736
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Education

Eminent sociologist A. H. Halsey examines the highly topical issue of the crisis which is currently afflicting British higher education.

British Universities Past and Present

Author: Robert Anderson
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780826433558
Release Date: 2006-09-27
Genre: Education

This book is both a concise history of British universities and their place in society over eight centuries, and a penetrating analysis of current university problems and policies as seen in the light of that history. It explains how the modern university system has developed since the Victorian era, and gives special attention to changes in policy since the Second World War, including the effects of the Robbins report, the rise and fall of the binary system, the impact of the Thatcher era, and the financial crises which have beset universities in recent years. A final chapter on the past and the present shows the continuing relevance of the ideals inherited from the past, and makes an important contribution to current controversies by identifying a distinctively British university model and discussing the historical relationship of state and market.

The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism Volume 9 Twentieth Century Historical Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives

Author: George Alexander Kennedy
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521300142
Release Date: 2001-04-30
Genre: Literary Criticism

This ninth volume in The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism presents a wide-ranging survey of developments in literary criticism and theory during the last century. Drawing on the combined expertise of a large team of specialist scholars, it offers an authoritative account of the various movements of thought that have made the late twentieth century such a richly productive period in the history of criticism. The aim has been to cover developments which have had greatest impact on the academic study of literature, along with background chapters that place those movements in a broader, intellectual, national and socio-cultural perspective. In comparison with Volumes Seven and Eight, also devoted to twentieth-century developments, there is marked emphasis on the rethinking of historical and philosophical approaches, which have emerged, especially during the past two decades, as among the most challenging areas of debate.

Sciences in the Universities of Europe Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Author: Ana Simoes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9789401796361
Release Date: 2015-04-20
Genre: Science

This book focuses on sciences in the universities of Europe in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the chapters in it provide an overview, mostly from the point of view of the history of science, of the different ways universities dealt with the institutionalization of science teaching and research. A useful book for understanding the deep changes that universities were undergoing in the last years of the 20th century. The book is organized around four central themes: 1) Universities in the longue durée; 2) Universities in diverse political contexts; 3) Universities and academic research; 4) Universities and discipline formation. The book is addressed at a broad readership which includes scholars and researchers in the field of General History, Cultural History, History of Universities, History of Education, History of Science and Technology, Science Policy, high school teachers, undergraduate and graduate students of sciences and humanities, and the general interested public.

Forming the Academic Profession in East Asia

Author: Terri Kim
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9780429850271
Release Date: 2018-10-10
Genre: Education

Originally published in 2001, Forming the Academic Profession in East Asia, examines the changing shape of the academic profession in South Korea, Malaysia and Singapore since the colonial period, and as a reflection of both the inherited models of higher education and their redefinition after the colonial period. The analysis takes into account the connections and disconnections between the colonial and postcolonial periods in shaping the academic profession.

The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain

Author: Martin Daunton
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0197263267
Release Date: 2005-05-26
Genre: Education

This collection of essays explores the questions of what counted as knowledge in Victorian Britain, who defined knowledge and the knowledgeable, by what means and by what criteria. During the Victorian period, the structure of knowledge took on a new and recognizably modern form, and the disciplines we now take for granted took shape. The ways in which knowledge was tested also took on a new form, with the rise of written examinations. New institutions of knowledge were created: museums were important at the start of the period, universities had become prominent by the end. Victorians needed to make sense of the sheer scale of new information, to popularize it, and at the same time to exclude ignorance and error - a role carried out by encyclopaedias and popular publications. By studying the Victorian organization of knowledge in its institutional, social, and intellectual settings, these essays contribute to our wider consideration of the complex and much debated concept of knowledge.

Historical Identities

Author: E. Lisa Panayotidis
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442659421
Release Date: 2006-12-15
Genre: History

As intellectual engines of the university, professors hold considerable authority and play an important role in society. By nature of their occupation, they are agents of intellectual culture in Canada. Historical Identities is a new collection of essays examining the history of the professoriate in Canada. Framing the volume with the question, 'What was it like to be a professor?' editors Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, along with an esteemed group of Canadian historians, strive to uncover and analyze variables and contexts – such as background, education, economics, politics, gender, and ethnicity – in the lives of academics throughout Canada's history. The contributors take an in-depth approach to topics such as academic freedom, professors and the state, faculty development, discipline construction and academic cultures, religion, biography, gender and faculty wives, images of professors, and background and childhood experiences. Including the best and most recent critical research in the field of the social history of higher education and professors, Historical Identities examines fundamental and challenging topics, issues, and arguments on the role and nature of intellectualism in Canada.

Universities

Author: Abraham Flexner
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412840716
Release Date: 1994-01-01
Genre: Education

Reprint of the Oxford University Press edition of 1930, with a long new introduction by Clark Kerr. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Managing Reform in Universities

Author: B. Stensaker
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137284297
Release Date: 2012-09-27
Genre: Education

This collection, now in paperback, explores how universities are coping with the range of reforms and changes taking place across higher education today. Analyzing areas such as leadership, quality management, strategic thinking, collegiality and academic work, and from the perspective of different agents within higher education including students, academics and management, this book examines the various differences between reform attempts and the actual changes happening in universities.

Conversations Choices and Chances

Author: Anthony Bradney
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781847310224
Release Date: 2003-04-07
Genre: Law

Most academics in university law schools would claim to offer a liberal education. Few have thought very much about what a liberal education in law means. Basing itself on a detailed examination of the theory of liberal education,this book looks at what the liberal university law school should be doing in terms of its teaching, research and administration.

The Rise and Decline of Faculty Governance

Author: Larry G. Gerber
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9781421414645
Release Date: 2014-07-23
Genre: Education

The Rise and Decline of Faculty Governance is the first history of shared governance in American higher education. Drawing on archival materials and extensive published sources, Larry G. Gerber shows how the professionalization of college teachers coincided with the rise of the modern university in the late nineteenth century and was the principal justification for granting teachers power in making educational decisions. In the twentieth century, the efforts of these governing faculties were directly responsible for molding American higher education into the finest academic system in the world. In recent decades, however, the growing complexity of "multiversities" and the application of business strategies to manage these institutions threatened the concept of faculty governance. Faculty shifted from being autonomous professionals to being "employees." The casualization of the academic labor market, Gerber argues, threatens to erode the quality of universities. As more faculty become contingent employees, rather than tenured career professionals enjoying both job security and intellectual autonomy, universities become factories in the knowledge economy. In addition to tracing the evolution of faculty decision making, this historical narrative provides readers with an important perspective on contemporary debates about the best way to manage America’s colleges and universities. Gerber also reflects on whether American colleges and universities will be able to retain their position of global preeminence in an increasingly market-driven environment, given that the system of governance that helped make their success possible has been fundamentally altered. -- Benjamin Ginsberg, author of The Fall of the Faculty: The Rise of the All-Administrative University and Why It MattersLawrence Poston, University of Illinois at Chicago

A History of Sociology in Britain

Author: A. H. Halsey
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780191532887
Release Date: 2004-03-18
Genre: Social Science

This is the first-ever critical history of sociology in Britain, written by one of the world's leading scholars in the field. Renowned British sociologist, A. H. Halsey, presents a vivid and authoritative picture of the neglect, expansion, fragmentation, and explosion of the discipline during the past century. He is well equipped to write the story, having lived through most of it and having taught and researched in Britain, the USA, and Europe. The story begins with L.T. Hobhouse's election to the first chair in sociology in London in 1907, but traces earlier origins of the discipline to Scotland and the English provinces. There is a lively account of the nineteenth-century battles between literature and science for the possession of the third culture of social studies, setting the context for a narrative history of rapid expansion in the second half of the twentieth century. LSE had a virtual monopoly before World War II. The educational establishment of Oxford and Cambridge opposed its introduction into the undergraduate curriculum. Only the expansion of sociology to the Scottish, Welsh, provincial, and 'new' universities after the Robbins Report of 1963 brought reluctant acceptance of the subject to Oxford and Cambridge. The student troubles of 1968 are then described and the subsequent doubts, confrontations, and cuts of the 1970s and 80s. Then, paradoxically by a Conservative Government, there was a new university expansion incorporating polytechnics and other colleges, with a consequent doubling of both staff and students in the 1990s. Yet the end of the century left sociology riven by intellectual conflict. It had survived the Marxist subversions of the 70s and the feminist invasion. Yet the renewed challenges of various forms of relativism (especially enthno-methodology and post-modernism) still threatened, and at root the war was, as it began, between a scientific quantifying and explanatory subject and a literary, interpretative set of cultural studies.

The Uses of the University

Author: Clark Kerr
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674005325
Release Date: 2001-03-02
Genre: Education

America's university president extraordinaire adds a new chapter and preface to The Uses of the University, probably the most important book on the modern university ever written. This summa on higher education brings the research university into the new century. The multiversity that Clark Kerr so presciently discovered now finds itself in an age of apprehension with few certainties. Leaders of institutions of higher learning can be either hedgehogs or foxes in the new age. Kerr gives five general points of advice on what kinds of attitudes universities should adopt. He then gives a blueprint for action for foxes, suggesting that a few hedgehogs need to be around to protect university autonomy and the public weal. "No book ever written has provided such a penetrating description of the modern research university or offered such insightful comments on its special tensions and problems ... Anyone wishing to understand the American research university—past, present, and future—must begin with a careful reading of this book." —Derek Bok, President Emeritus, Harvard University

The Degradation of the Academic Dogma

Author: Robert A. Nisbet
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 1412821428
Release Date: 1971
Genre: Education

This is one of the most important books ever published about the American university. Robert Nisbet accuses universities of having betrayed themselves. Over the centuries they earned the respect of society by attempting to remain faithful to what he terms "the academic dogma," the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake. The measure of a university's greatness and of the stature of an individual scholar was determined not by the immediate usefulness of the work done, but by how much it contributed to scholarship, learning, and teaching. American universities abandoned this ideal, Nisbet charges, after World War II, welcoming onto their campuses academic entrepreneurs engaged in the "higher capitalism," the highly profitable sale of knowledge. This "reformation," says Nisbet, has resulted in the greatest change in the structure and values of the university that has occurred since their founding as guilds in the Middle Ages. And it may be responsible, for reasons he spells out in convincing detail, for their eventual demise as centers of learning. In her introduction, Gertrude Himmelfarb pays tribute to Robert Nisbet for his prescience in analyzing the reformation of the university in the postwar period. A second reformation, she says, has further undermined the academic dogma, first by applying the principles of affirmative action and multiculturalism to the curriculum as well as to student admissions and faculty hiring, and then by "deconstructing" the disciplines, thus subverting the ideas of truth, reason, and objectivity. The Degradation of the Academic Dogma is even more pertinent today than when it was first published a quarter of a century ago. For those concerned with the integrity of the university and of intellectual life, Robert Nisbet has once again proved himself a prophet and a mentor.