Displacement Diaspora and Geographies of Identity

Author: Smadar Lavie
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822317206
Release Date: 1996
Genre: Social Science

Displacement, Diaspora, and Geographies of Identity challenges conventional understandings of identity based on notions of nation and culture as bounded or discrete. Through careful examinations of various transnational, hybrid, border, and diasporic forces and practices, these essays push at the edge of cultural studies, postmodernism, and postcolonial theory and raise crucial questions about ethnographic methodology. This volume exemplifies a cross-disciplinary cultural studies and a concept of culture rooted in lived experience as well as textual readings. Anthropologists and scholars from related fields deploy a range of methodologies and styles of writing to blur and complicate conventional dualisms between authors and subjects of research, home and away, center and periphery, and first and third world. Essays discuss topics such as Rai, a North African pop music viewed as westernized in Algeria and as Arab music in France; the place of Sephardic and Palestinian writers within Israel’s Ashkenazic-dominated arts community; and the use and misuse of the concept “postcolonial” as it is applied in various regional contexts. In exploring histories of displacement and geographies of identity, these essays call for the reconceptualization of theoretical binarisms such as modern and postmodern, colonial and postcolonial. It will be of interest to a broad spectrum of scholars and students concerned with postmodern and postcolonial theory, ethnography, anthropology, and cultural studies. Contributors. Norma Alarcón, Edward M. Bruner, Nahum D. Chandler, Ruth Frankenberg, Joan Gross, Dorinne Kondo, Kristin Koptiuch, Smadar Lavie, Lata Mani, David McMurray, Kirin Narayan, Greg Sarris, Ted Swedenburg

Dropping Anchor Setting Sail

Author: Jacqueline Nassy Brown
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400826411
Release Date: 2009-01-10
Genre: Social Science

The port city of Liverpool, England, is home to one of the oldest Black communities in Britain. Its members proudly date their history back at least as far as the nineteenth century, with the global wanderings and eventual settlement of colonial African seamen. Jacqueline Nassy Brown analyzes how this worldly origin story supports an avowedly local Black politic and identity--a theme that becomes a window onto British politics of race, place, and nation, and Liverpool's own contentious origin story as a gloriously cosmopolitan port of world-historical import that was nonetheless central to British slave trading and imperialism. This ethnography also examines the rise and consequent dilemmas of Black identity. It captures the contradictions of diaspora in postcolonial Liverpool, where African and Afro-Caribbean heritages and transnational linkages with Black America both contribute to and compete with the local as a basis for authentic racial identity. Crisscrossing historical periods, rhetorical modes, and academic genres, the book focuses singularly on "place," enabling its most radical move: its analysis of Black racial politics as enactments of English cultural premises. The insistent focus on English culture implies a further twist. Just as Blacks are racialized through appeals to their assumed Afro-Caribbean and African cultures, so too has Liverpool--an Irish, working-class city whose expansive port faces the world beyond Britain--long been beyond the pale of dominant notions of authentic Englishness. Dropping Anchor, Setting Sail studies "race" through clashing constructions of "Liverpool."

Carolina Genesis

Author: Scott Withrow
Publisher: Backintyme
ISBN: 9780939479320
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Minorities

Some Americans pretend that a watertight line separates the "races." But most know that millions of mixed-heritage families crossed from one "race" to another over the past four centuries. Every essay in this collection tells such a tale. Each speaks with a different style and to different interests. But taken together, the seven articles paint a portrait, unsurpassed in the literature, of migrations, challenges, and triumphs over "racial" obstacles. Stacy Webb tells of families of mixed ancestry who pioneered westward paths from the Carolinas into the colonial wilderness, paths now known as Cumberland Road, Natchez Trace, Three-Chopped Way, and others. They migrated, not in search of wealth or exploration, but to escape the injustice of America's hardening "racial" barrier. Govinda Sanyal's astonishing research uses mtDNA markers to trace a single female lineage that winds its way through prehistoric Yemen, North Africa, Moorish Spain, the Sephardic diaspora, colonial Mexico, and finally escapes the Inquisition by assimilating into a Native American tribe, ending up in South Carolina. He fleshes out the DNA thread with documented genealogy, so we get to know their names, their lives, their struggles. Cyndie Goins Hoelscher focuses on a specific family that scattered from the Carolinas. One branch fled to Texas, becoming friends with Sam Houston and participating in the founding of that state. Other bands fought in the war of 1812, or migrated to Florida or the Gulf coast. Nowadays, Goins descendants can be found in nearly every state and are of nearly every "race." Scott Withrow (the collection's editor) concentrates on the saga of one individual of mixed ancestry. Joseph Willis was born into a community of color in South Carolina. He migrated to Louisiana, was accepted as a White man, founded one of the first churches in the area, and became one of the region's best-loved and most fondly remembered Christian ministers. S. Pony Hill recounts the historic struggles of South Carolina's Cheraw tribe, in a reprint of Chapter 5 of his book, "Strangers in Their Own Land." Marvin Jones tells the history of the "Winton Triangle," a section of North Carolina populated by successful families of mixed ancestry from colonial times until the mid-20th century. They fought for the Union, founded schools, built businesses, and thrived through adversity until the civil rights movement of 1955-65 ended legal segregation. K. Paul Johnson traces the history of North Carolina's antebellum Quakers. The once-strong community dissolved as it grew morally opposed to slavery. Those who stayed true to their faith migrated north. Those who remained slaveowners left the church. The worst stress was the Nat Turner event. Its aftermath helped turn the previously permeable color line into the harsh endogamous barrier that exists today.

Intercultural Alliances

Author: Mary Jane Collier
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 9780761925903
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

The 25th volume of the International and Intercultural Communication Annual offers a variety of perspectives on culture, identity, and the formation of personal and political alliances.

Imagining Home

Author: Anamaria Falaus
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 9781443865777
Release Date: 2014-08-11
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In an age of shifting social and political landscapes, there is one constant challenge individuals and groups have to face: that of internalizing the tension between the two opposing tendencies that rule the world today, homogenization and heterogenization. People transgress the limits of nationality, ethnicity, and culture in order to become citizens of the world, while at the same time longing for stability and certainty. Imagining Home: Exilic Reconstructions in Norma Manea and Andrei Codrescu’s Diasporic Narratives interprets the polymorphous development of two exiled writers’ identities, from the point of view of their “migrant” condition. Their restless, nomadic existence, perfectly reflected in the geographical territories mapped by the books under discussion, involves crossing boundaries, negotiating difference, and the colonizing imposition of a foreign culture. The outcome provides an insight into the concepts of Romanianness and Americanness, analysing them through the notions of alo-images and infra-images, while at the same time developing a context and a reading approach for Eastern European immigrant narratives.

Mambo Montage

Author: Agustín Laó-Montes
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231505444
Release Date: 2001-06-13
Genre: Social Science

New York is the capital of mambo and a global factory of latinidad. This book covers the topic in all its multifaceted aspects, from Jim Crow baseball in the first half of the twentieth century to hip hop and ethno-racial politics, from Latinas and labor unions to advertising and Latino culture, from Cuban cuisine to the language of signs in New York City. Together the articles map out the main conceptions of Latino identity as well as the historical process of Latinization of New York. Mambo Montage is both a way of imagining latinidad and an angle of vision on the city.

Places We Share

Author: Susan Ossman
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739117092
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

This book explores the relationship of mobility to subjectivity, identity to place by exploring the lives of people on the move. The authors draw on research among nomads, immigrants and serial migrants and question their own trajectories. Their comments on cosmopolitanism, ethnicity and religion challenge conventional wisdom from concrete but 'ungrounded' perspectives.

Locations of Knowledge in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Author: Kocku Von Stuckrad
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9789004184220
Release Date: 2010
Genre: History

Addressing discourses of perfect knowledge in Western culture between 1200 and 1800, this book integrates the study of Western esotericism in a larger analytical framework of European history of religion.

The Blue Sapphire of the Mind

Author: Douglas E. Christie
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199986644
Release Date: 2012-12-04
Genre: Religion

"There are no unsacred places," the poet Wendell Berry has written. "There are only sacred places and desecrated places." What might it mean to behold the world with such depth and feeling that it is no longer possible to imagine it as something separate from ourselves, or to live without regard for its well-being? To understand the work of seeing things as an utterly involving moral and spiritual act? Such questions have long occupied the center of contemplative spiritual traditions. In The Blue Sapphire of the Mind, Douglas E. Christie proposes a distinctively contemplative approach to ecological thought and practice that can help restore our sense of the earth as a sacred place. Drawing on the insights of the early Christian monastics as well as the ecological writings of Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Annie Dillard, and many others, Christie argues that, at the most basic level, it is the quality of our attention to the natural world that must change if we are to learn how to live in a sustainable relationship with other living organisms and with one another. He notes that in this uniquely challenging historical moment, there is a deep and pervasive hunger for a less fragmented and more integrated way of apprehending and inhabiting the living world--and for a way of responding to the ecological crisis that expresses our deepest moral and spiritual values. Christie explores how the wisdom of ancient and modern contemplative traditions can inspire both an honest reckoning with the destructive patterns of thought and behavior that have contributed so much to our current crisis, and a greater sense of care and responsibility for all living beings. These traditions can help us cultivate the simple, spacious awareness of the enduring beauty and wholeness of the natural world that will be necessary if we are to live with greater purpose and meaning, and with less harm, to our planet.

Remembering and Rethinking the GDR

Author: A. Saunders
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9781137292094
Release Date: 2012-12-15
Genre: Social Science

Exploring the ways in which the GDR has been remembered since its demise in 1989/90, this volume asks how memory of the former state continues to shape contemporary Germany. Its contributors offer multiple perspectives on the GDR and offer new insights into the complex relationship between past and present.

The Troubles in Ballybogoin

Author: William F. Kelleher
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472089789
Release Date: 2004-08-20
Genre: History

DIVA fascinating exploration of how social memory serves to hinder communication and foster disorder in Northern Ireland /div

Queer Latinidad

Author: Juana María Rodríguez
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814776865
Release Date: 2003-01-01
Genre: Social Science

According to the 2000 census, Latinos/as have become the largest ethnic minority group in the United States. Images of Latinos and Latinas in mainstream news and in popular culture suggest a Latin Explosion at center stage, yet the topic of queer identity in relation to Latino/a America remains under examined. Juana María Rodríguez attempts to rectify this dearth of scholarship in Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices, Discursive Spaces, by documenting the ways in which identities are transformed by encounters with language, the law, culture, and public policy. She identifies three key areas as the project’s case studies: activism, primarily HIV prevention; immigration law; and cyberspace. In each, Rodríguez theorizes the ways queer Latino/a identities are enabled or constrained, melding several theoretical and methodological approaches to argue that these sites are complex and dynamic social fields. As she moves the reader from one disciplinary location to the other, Rodríguez reveals the seams of her own academic engagement with queer latinidad. This deftly crafted work represents a dynamic and innovative approach to the study of identity formation and representation, making a vital contribution to a new reformulation of gender and sexuality studies.

African Immigrant Religions in America

Author: Jacob Olupona
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814762400
Release Date: 2007-05-01
Genre: Religion

African immigration to North America has been rapidly increasing. Yet, little has been written about this significant group of immigrants and the particular religious traditions that they are transplanting on our shores, as scholars continue largely to focus instead on immigrants from Europe and Asia. African Immigrant Religions in America focuses on new understandings and insights concerning the presence and relevance of African immigrant religious communities in the United States. It explores the profound significance of religion in the lives of immigrants and the relevance of these growing communities for U.S. social life. It describes key social and historical aspects of African immigrant religion in the U.S. and builds a conceptual framework for theory and analysis. The volume broadens our understandings of the ways in which new immigration is changing the face of Christianity in the U.S. and adds needed breadth to the study of the black church, incorporating the experiences of African immigrant religious communities in America.