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Author: Eithne Luibhéid
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816638039
Release Date: 2002
Genre: Social Science

Lesbians, prostitutes, women likely to have sex across racial lines, "brought to the United States for immoral purposes, " or "arriving in a state of pregnancy" -- national threats, one and all. Since the late nineteenth century, immigrant women's sexuality has been viewed as a threat to national security, to be contained through strict border-monitoring practices. By scrutinizing this policy, its origins, and its application, Eithne Luibheid shows how the U.S. border became a site not just for controlling female sexuality but also for contesting, constructing, and renegotiating sexual identity. Initially targeting Chinese women, immigration control based on sexuality rapidly expanded to encompass every woman who sought entry to the United States. The particular cases Luibheid examines -- efforts to differentiate Chinese prostitutes from wives, the 1920s exclusion of Japanese wives to reduce the Japanese-American birthrate, the deportation of a Mexican woman on charges of lesbianism, the role of rape in mediating women's border crossings today -- challenge conventional accounts that attribute exclusion solely to prejudice or lack of information. This innovative work clearly links sexuality-based immigration exclusion to a dominant nationalism premised on sexual, gender, racial, and class hierarchies.

Gendering Border Studies

Author:
Publisher: University of Wales Press
ISBN: 9780708323113
Release Date: 2010-08-01
Genre: Social Science

The study of borders has recently undergone significant transitions, reflecting changes in the functions of boundaries themselves, as the world political map has experienced transformations. Gender (defined as the knowledge about perceived distinctions between the sexes) is an important signifier of borders as constructed and contested lines of differences. In the interplay with other categories of difference, such as class, race, ethnicity and religion, it plays a major role in giving meaning to different forms of borders. It is not surprising, then, that an increasing number of studies in the last years have aimed for a gendering of border studies. This book aims to explore this new interdisciplinary field and develop it further. The main questions it asks are: how do we define ‘borders’, ‘frontiers’ and ‘boundaries’ in different disciplinary approaches of gendered border studies? What were and are the main fields of gendered border studies? What might be important questions for future research? And how useful is an inter- or transdisciplinary approach for gendered border studies? Fifteen established scholars from various disciplines contribute chapters in which they set out how the issue of gender and borders has been approached in their discipline and describe what they expect from future research. After a detailed introduction presenting these issues, the book is divided into four sections: migration and gender; gendered narratives of border crossing; gender and the drawing of internal boundaries, and teaching gendered borders.

The Sexuality of Migration

Author: Lionel Cantu
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814772021
Release Date: 2009-02-01
Genre: Social Science

Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association, Sociology of Sexualities Section Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award in Latino Studies Honorable Mention from the Latin American Studies Association The Sexuality of Migration provides an innovative study of the experiences of Mexican men who have same sex with men and who have migrated to the United States. Until recently, immigration scholars have left out the experiences of gays and lesbians. In fact, the topic of sexuality has only recently been addressed in the literature on immigration. The Sexuality of Migration makes significant connections among sexuality, state institutions, and global economic relations. Cantú; situates his analysis within the history of Mexican immigration and offers a broad understanding of diverse migratory experiences ranging from recent gay asylum seekers to an assessment of gay tourism in Mexico. Cantú uses a variety of methods including archival research, interviews, and ethnographic research to explore the range of experiences of Mexican men who have sex with men and the political economy of sexuality and immigration. His primary research site is the greater Los Angeles area, where he interviewed many immigrant men and participated in organizations and community activities alongside his informants. Sure to fill gaps in the field, The Sexuality of Migration simultaneously complicates a fixed notion of sexual identity and explores the complex factors that influence immigration and migration experiences.

Memories and Migrations

Author: Vicki Ruíz
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252074783
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Social Science

Using region as a category of analysis, this pioneering collection explores the reciprocal relationship between Latinas and location. In highlighting the multiple ways in which Latinas grapple with their identity, the contributors significantly increase our understanding of how identity is created, negotiated, claimed, and remembered. This pathbreaking volume compares Latinas from a variety of backgrounds, moving the focus from Los Angeles, New York, and Santa Fe to Chicago, Tucson, and Philadelphia. Memories and Migrations embodies the constant negotiation and shaping of scholarship, which mirrors the fluidity of Latina migration, memory, and identity. Contributors include Gabriela F. Arredondo, John R. Chávez, Marisela R. Chávez, Yolanda Chávez Leyva, María E. Montoya, Lydia R. Otero, Vicki L. Ruiz, Elizabeth Salas, Virginia Sánchez Korrol, and Carmen Teresa Whalen.

Pregnant on Arrival

Author: Eithne Luibhéid
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816685431
Release Date: 2013-08-01
Genre: Social Science

“State alert as pregnant asylum seekers aim for Ireland.” “Country Being Held Hostage by Con Men, Spongers, and Those Taking Advantage of the Maternity Residency Policy.” From 1997 to 2004, headlines such as these dominated Ireland’s mainstream media as pregnant immigrants were recast as “illegals” entering the country to gain legal residency through childbirth. As immigration soared, Irish media and politicians began to equate this phenomenon with illegal immigration that threatened to destroy the country’s social, cultural, and economic fabric. Pregnant on Arrival explores how pregnant immigrants were made into paradigmatic figures of illegal immigration, as well as the measures this characterization set into motion and the consequences for immigrants and citizens. While focusing on Ireland, Eithne Luibhéid’s analysis illuminates global struggles over the citizenship status of children born to immigrant parents in countries as diverse as the United States, Hong Kong, and elsewhere. Scholarship on the social construction of the illegal immigrant calls on histories of colonialism, global capitalism, racism, and exclusionary nation building but has been largely silent on the role of nationalist sexual regimes in determining legal status. Eithne Luibhéid turns to queer theory to understand how pregnancy, sexuality, and immigrants’ relationships to prevailing sexual norms affect their chances of being designated as legal or illegal. Pregnant on Arrival offers unvarnished insight into how categories of immigrant legal status emerge and change, how sexual regimes figure prominently in these processes, and how efforts to prevent illegal immigration ultimately redefine nationalist sexual norms and associated racial, gender, economic, and geopolitical hierarchies.

National Insecurities

Author: Deirdre M. Moloney
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807882610
Release Date: 2012-05-07
Genre: History

For over a century, deportation and exclusion have defined eligibility for citizenship in the United States and, in turn, have shaped what it means to be American. In this broad analysis of policy from 1882 to present, Deirdre Moloney places current debates about immigration issues in historical context. Focusing on several ethnic groups, Moloney closely examines how gender and race led to differences in the implementation of U.S. immigration policy as well as how poverty, sexuality, health, and ideologies were regulated at the borders. Emphasizing the perspectives of immigrants and their advocates, Moloney weaves in details from case files that illustrate the impact policy decisions had on individual lives. She explores the role of immigration policy in diplomatic relations between the U.S. and other nations, and shows how federal, state, and local agencies had often conflicting priorities and approaches to immigration control. Throughout, Moloney traces the ways that these policy debates contributed to a modern understanding of citizenship and human rights in the twentieth century and even today.

Chinese Mexicans

Author: Julia María Schiavone Camacho
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807882597
Release Date: 2012-05-07
Genre: History

At the turn of the twentieth century, a wave of Chinese men made their way to the northern Mexican border state of Sonora to work and live. The ties--and families--these Mexicans and Chinese created led to the formation of a new cultural identity: Chinese Mexican. During the tumult of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, however, anti-Chinese sentiment ultimately led to mass expulsion of these people. Julia Maria Schiavone Camacho follows the community through the mid-twentieth century, across borders and oceans, to show how they fought for their place as Mexicans, both in Mexico and abroad. Tracing transnational geography, Schiavone Camacho explores how these men and women developed a strong sense of Mexican national identity while living abroad--in the United States, briefly, and then in southeast Asia where they created a hybrid community and taught their children about the Mexican homeland. Schiavone Camacho also addresses how Mexican women challenged their legal status after being stripped of Mexican citizenship because they married Chinese men. After repatriation in the 1930s-1960s, Chinese Mexican men and women, who had left Mexico with strong regional identities, now claimed national cultural belonging and Mexican identity in ways they had not before.

A Global History of Sexuality

Author: Robert M. Buffington
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118525883
Release Date: 2013-12-02
Genre: History

A Global History of Sexuality provides a provocative,wide-ranging introduction to the history of sexuality from the lateeighteenth century to the present day. Explores what sexuality has meant in the everyday lives ofindividuals over the last 200 years Organized around four major themes: the formation of sexualidentity, the regulation of sexuality by societal norms, theregulation of sexuality by institutions, and the intersection ofsexuality with globalization Examines the topic from a comparative, global perspective, withwell-chosen case studies to illuminate the broader themes Includes interdisciplinary contributions from prominenthistorians, sociologists, anthropologists, and sexuality studiesscholars Introduces important theoretical concepts in a clear,accessible way

Latin American Research Review

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: UTEXAS:059172147658800
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Electronic journals

An interdisciplinary journal that publishes original research and surveys of current research on Latin America and the Caribbean.

The Straight State

Author: Margot Canaday
Publisher:
ISBN: MINN:31951P007860363
Release Date: 2004
Genre: Homosexuality


Line in the Sand

Author: Rachel C. St. John
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105118600126
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Mexican-American Border Region


GLQ

Author:
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105121653757
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Electronic journals


Battleground

Author: Judith Ann Warner
Publisher: Greenwood Pub Group
ISBN: 0313344132
Release Date: 2008-12-30
Genre: Social Science