Eyes on the Prize

Author: Juan Williams
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101639306
Release Date: 2013-09-03
Genre: Political Science

Eyes on the Prize traces the movement from the landmark Brown v. the Board of Education case in 1954 to the march on Selma and the passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965. This is a companion volume to the first part of the acclaimed PBS series.

Eyes on the Prize

Author: Juan Williams
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 0143124749
Release Date: 2013
Genre: History

Traces the history of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century, focusing on the unheralded activists who brought the movement to life.

Eyes on the Prize

Author: Juan Williams
Publisher:
ISBN: 1439509956
Release Date: 2008-07-10
Genre: Political Science

Traces the history of the civil rights movement, focusing on the unheralded activists who brought the movement to life

The Eyes on the Prize

Author: Clayborne Carson
Publisher:
ISBN: 1439505403
Release Date: 2008-06-26
Genre: Political Science

Examines the background of the Civil Rights movement

True South

Author: Jon Else
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101980934
Release Date: 2017
Genre: History

Henry Hampton's 1987 landmark multipart television series oEyes On The Prize,o an eloquent, plainspoken chronicle of the civil rights movement, is now the classic narrative of that history. Before Hampton, the movement's history been written or filmed by whites and weighted heavily toward Dr. King's telegenic leadership. oEyeso told the story from the point of view of ordinary people inside the civil rights movement--the ofan ladieso and oordinary world parishioners,o mostly African American. Hampton shifted the focus from victimization to strength, from white saviors to black courage. He recovered and permanently fixed the images we now all remember (but had been lost at the time)-Selma and Montgomery, pickets and firehoses, ballot boxes and mass meetings. Jon Else was Hampton's series producer, and his moving book focuses on the tumultuous 18 months in 1985 and 1986 when oEyeso was finally created, a point where many wires cross- the new telling of African American history, the complex mechanics of documentary making, the rise of social justice film, the politics of television (The Boston Globeand The New York Timespublished articles about Hampton's bitter funding problems, in which they named major foundations and corporations that had declined to support his telling the civil rights story.) And because Else, like Hampton and many of the key staffers, was himself a veteran of the movement, his book braids together battle tales from their own experiences as civil rights workers in the South in the 1960s. oEyeso re-introduced Emmett Till to a world that had forgotten him and showed us the guts it took to cross the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama, or walk up the school steps in Little Rock, Arkansas. It chronicled that great expansion of American democracy through legal victories, direct action, voter registration, and legislation. Hampton was not afraid to show the movement's raw realities- conflicts between secular and religious leaders, the shift toward black power and armed black resistance in the face of savage white violence. It is all on the screen, and the fight to get it all into the films was at times as ferocious as the history being depicted. Henry Hampton utterly changed the way social history is told, taught, and remembered today.

Voices of Freedom

Author: Henry Hampton
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 9780307574183
Release Date: 2011-08-03
Genre: Social Science

In this monumental volume, Henry Hampton, creator and executive producer of the acclaimed PBS series Eyes on the Prize, and Steve Fayer, series writer, draw upon nearly one thousand interviews with civil rights activists, politicians, reporters, Justice Department officials, and hundreds of ordinary people who took part in the struggle, weaving a fascinating narrative of the civil rights movement told by the people who lived it. Join brave and terrified youngsters walking through a jeering mob and up the steps of Central High School in Little Rock. Listen to the vivid voices of the ordinary people who manned the barricades, the laborers, the students, the housewives without whom there would have been no civil rights movements at all. This remarkable oral history brings to life country's great struggle for civil rights as no conventional narrative can. You will hear the voices of those who defied the blackjacks, who went to jail, who witnessed and policed the movement; of those who stood for and against it—voices from the heart of America. From the Trade Paperback edition.

African American Civil Rights

Author: Angela Jones
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313393600
Release Date: 2011-08-31
Genre: History

• Primary source documents including the Niagara Movement's "Declaration of Principles" • A chronology of the development of the civil rights movement • Photographs of key players in the Niagara Movement • An expansive bibliography encompassing titles from sociology, political science, and history

Free At Last

Author: Sara Bullard
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199762279
Release Date: 1994-10-06
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Here is an illustrated history of the civil rights movement, written and designed for ages 10 to adult, that clearly and effectively brings the turbulent years of struggle to life, and gives a vivid and powerful experience of what it was like not so very long ago. Provides a brief overview of black history in the US, discussing the civil-rights movement chronologically through stories and photos.

Freedom s Main Line

Author: Derek Charles Catsam
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 9780813138862
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: History

Black Americans in the Jim Crow South could not escape the grim reality of racial segregation, whether enforced by law or by custom. In Freedom's Main Line: The Journey of Reconciliation and the Freedom Rides, author Derek Charles Catsam shows that courtrooms, classrooms, and cemeteries were not the only front lines in African Americans' prolonged struggle for basic civil rights. Buses, trains, and other modes of public transportation provided the perfect means for civil rights activists to protest the second-class citizenship of African Americans, bringing the reality of the violence of segregation into the consciousness of America and the world. In 1947, nearly a decade before the Supreme Court voided school segregation in Brown v. Board of Education, sixteen black and white activists embarked on a four-state bus tour, called the Journey of Reconciliation, to challenge discrimination in busing and other forms of public transportation. Although the Journey drew little national attention, it set the stage for the more timely and influential 1961 Freedom Rides. After the Supreme Court's 1960 ruling in Boynton v. Virginia that segregated public transportation violated the Interstate Commerce Act, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and other civil rights groups organized the Freedom Rides to test the enforcement of the ruling in buses and bus terminals across the South. Their goal was simple: "to make bus desegregation," as a CORE press release put it, "a reality instead of merely an approved legal doctrine." Freedom's Main Line argues that the Freedom Rides, a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement, were a logical, natural evolution of such earlier efforts as the Journey of Reconciliation, their organizers following models provided by previous challenges to segregation and relying on the principles of nonviolence so common in the larger movement. The impact of the Freedom Rides, however, was unprecedented, fixing the issue of civil rights in the national consciousness. Later activists were often dubbed Freedom Riders even if they never set foot on a bus. With challenges to segregated transportation as his point of departure, Catsam chronicles black Americans' long journey toward increased civil rights. Freedom's Main Line tells the story of bold incursions into the heart of institutional discrimination, journeys undertaken by heroic individuals who forced racial injustice into the national and international spotlight and helped pave the way for the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964.

What the Hell Do You Have to Lose

Author: Juan Williams
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 9781541788275
Release Date: 2018-09-25
Genre: History

The bestselling author, political analyst, and civil rights expert delivers a forceful critique of the Trump administration's ignorant and unprecedented rollback of the civil rights movement. In this powerful and timely book, civil rights historian and political analyst Juan Williams denounces Donald Trump for intentionally twisting history to fuel racial tensions for his political advantage. In Williams's lifetime, crusaders for civil rights have braved hatred, violence, and imprisonment, and in so doing made life immeasurably better for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Remarkably, all this progress suddenly seems to have been forgotten--or worse, undone. The stirring history of hard-fought and heroic battles for voting rights, integrated schools, and more is under direct threat from an administration dedicated to restricting these basic freedoms. Williams pulls the fire alarm on the Trump administration's policies, which pose a threat to civil rights without precedent in modern America. What the Hell Do You Have to Lose? makes a searing case for the enduring value of our historic accomplishments and what happens if they are lost.

Muzzled

Author: Juan Williams
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 9780307952028
Release Date: 2012-07
Genre: Political Science

Williams discusses the countless ways in which honest debate in America--from the halls of Congress and the health care town halls to the talk shows and print media--is stifled.

The King Years

Author: Taylor Branch
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451662474
Release Date: 2013-01-08
Genre: History

Taylor Branch, author of the acclaimed America in the King Years, introduces selections from the trilogy in clear context and gripping detail. The King Years delivers riveting tales of everyday heroes who achieved miracles in constructive purpose and yet poignantly fell short. Here is the full sweep of an era that still reverberates in national politics. Its legacy remains unsettled; there are further lessons to be discovered before free citizens can once again move officials to address the most intractable, fearful dilemmas. This vital primer amply fulfills its author’s dedication: “For students of freedom and teachers of history.” This compact volume brings to life eighteen pivotal dramas, beginning with the impromptu speech that turned an untested, twenty-six-year-old Martin Luther King forever into a public figure on the first night of the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. Five years later, minority students filled the jails in a 1960 sit-in movement, and, in 1961, the Freedom Riders seized national attention. Branch interprets King’s famous speech at the 1963 March on Washington, then relives the Birmingham church bombing that challenged his dream of equal souls and equal votes. We see student leader Bob Moses mobilize college volunteers for Mississippi’s 1964 Freedom Summer, and a decade-long movement at last secures the first of several landmark laws for equal rights. At the same time, the presidential nominating conventions were drawn into sharp and unprecedented party realignment. In “King, J. Edgar Hoover, and the Nobel Peace Prize,” Branch details the covert use of state power for a personal vendetta. “Crossroads in Selma” describes King’s ordeal to steer the battered citizen’s movement through hopes and threats from every level of government. “Crossroads in Vietnam” glimpses the ominous wartime split between King and President Lyndon Johnson. As backlash shadowed a Chicago campaign to expose northern prejudice, and the Black Power slogan of Stokely Carmichael captivated a world grown weary of nonviolent protest, King grew ever more isolated. As Branch writes, King “pushed downward into lonelier causes until he wound up among the sanitation workers of Memphis.” A requiem chapter leads to his fateful assassination.

In Search of the Movement

Author: Benjamin Hedin
Publisher: City Lights Publishers
ISBN: 9780872866522
Release Date: 2015-03-09
Genre: History

Published on the 50th anniversary of the Selma-to-Montgomery, Alabama marches, Ben Hedin analyzes the legacy of the Civil Rights movement.

Stokely Speaks

Author: Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture)
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 9781613742952
Release Date: 2007-02-01
Genre: Political Science

In the speeches and articles collected in this book, the black activist, organizer, and freedom fighter Stokely Carmichael traces the dramatic changes in his own consciousness and that of black Americans that took place during the evolving movements of Civil Rights, Black Power, and Pan-Africanism. Unique in his belief that the destiny of African Americans could not be separated from that of oppressed people the world over, Carmichael's Black Power principles insisted that blacks resist white brainwashing and redefine themselves. He was concerned not only with racism and exploitation, but with cultural integrity and the colonization of Africans in America. In these essays on racism, Black Power, the pitfalls of conventional liberalism, and solidarity with the oppressed masses and freedom fighters of all races and creeds, Carmichael addresses questions that still confront the black world and points to a need for an ideology of black and African liberation, unification, and transformation.