Food and Urbanism

Author: Susan Parham
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9780857854742
Release Date: 2015-02-26
Genre: Social Science

Cities are home to over fifty percent of the world's population, a figure which is expected to increase enormously by 2050. Despite the growing demand on urban resources and infrastructure, food is still often overlooked as a key factor in planning and designing cities. Without incorporating food into the design process ? how it is grown, transported, and bought, cooked, eaten and disposed of ? it is impossible to create truly resilient and convivial urbanism. Moving from the table and home garden to the town, city, and suburbs, Food and Urbanism explores the connections between food and place in past and present design practices. The book also looks to future methods for extending the 'gastronomic' possibilities of urban space. Supported by examples from places across the world, including the UK, Norway, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Romania, Australia and the USA, the book offers insights into how the interplay of physical design and socio-spatial practices centred around food can help to maintain socially rich, productive and sustainable urban space. Susan Parham brings together the latest research from a number of disciplines ? urban planning, food studies, sociology, geography, and design ? with her own fieldwork on a range of foodscapes to highlight the fundamental role food has to play in shaping the urban future.

Food Urbanism

Author: Craig Verzone
Publisher: Birkhauser
ISBN: 3035615993
Release Date: 2018-07-15
Genre: Architecture

With an increasing interest in quality of nutrition and health, urban food production has begun to occur inside the growing cities worldwide and risks to compete with other urban needs. The book introduces typologies, tools, evaluation methods and strategies, and shows the practical applications of the methods. Multiple projects illustrate solutions that augment quality via the insertion of food production entities into the urban realm.

Agricultural Urbanism

Author: Janine M. De La Salle
Publisher:
ISBN: 0981243428
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Architecture

Our awareness of the significant challenge our food supply faces in the 21st century is growing rapidly. However, few people offer more than a suggestion that we all grow our own food in our backyard or balcony, attend a farmers' market, and lobby for global change. This book, rooted in a sustainable food system approach and written by leaders in planning and design, outlines a powerful strategy for understanding and taking action on the full scope of sustainable food system opportunities in cities and how we build them. This book takes sustainable food systems far beyond the community garden and the buying of local food and into strategies for supporting local food processing, wholesale and marketing, education and training programs, and celebration and culture around food, ensuring access to health food for all. Agricultural Urbanism has been declared as the next our big movement for New Urbanism in the 21st century as we grapple with how to make our cities not only more sustainable but also great places to live. This book outlines key strategies to create magnetic and unique agriculture and food precincts and community places where food is celebrated all year round. Authored by the most innovative and leading thinkers and practitioners in the Southwest of Canada, this book offers a new and exciting concept of agricultural urbanism that unifies urban and rural in a previously unconceived way.

Food Urbanism

Author: Jason Grimm
Publisher:
ISBN: OCLC:672026736
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Sustainable design


Sustainable Urbanism

Author: Douglas Farr
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118174517
Release Date: 2012-01-09
Genre: Architecture

Written by the chair of the LEED-Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) initiative, Sustainable Urbanism: Urban Design with Nature is both an urgent call to action and a comprehensive introduction to "sustainable urbanism"--the emerging and growing design reform movement that combines the creation and enhancement of walkable and diverse places with the need to build high-performance infrastructure and buildings. Providing a historic perspective on the standards and regulations that got us to where we are today in terms of urban lifestyle and attempts at reform, Douglas Farr makes a powerful case for sustainable urbanism, showing where we went wrong, and where we need to go. He then explains how to implement sustainable urbanism through leadership and communication in cities, communities, and neighborhoods. Essays written by Farr and others delve into such issues as: Increasing sustainability through density. Integrating transportation and land use. Creating sustainable neighborhoods, including housing, car-free areas, locally-owned stores, walkable neighborhoods, and universal accessibility. The health and environmental benefits of linking humans to nature, including walk-to open spaces, neighborhood stormwater systems and waste treatment, and food production. High performance buildings and district energy systems. Enriching the argument are in-depth case studies in sustainable urbanism, from BedZED in London, England and Newington in Sydney, Australia, to New Railroad Square in Santa Rosa, California and Dongtan, Shanghai, China. An epilogue looks to the future of sustainable urbanism over the next 200 years. At once solidly researched and passionately argued, Sustainable Urbanism is the ideal guidebook for urban designers, planners, and architects who are eager to make a positive impact on our--and our descendants'--buildings, cities, and lives.

Barrio Urbanism

Author: David R. Diaz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781135943202
Release Date: 2005-08-08
Genre: Architecture

This, the first book on Latinos in America from an urban planning/policy perspective, covers the last century, and includes a substantial historical overview the subject. The authors trace the movement of Latinos (primarily Chicanos) into American cities from Mexico and then describe the problems facing them in those cities. They then show how the planning profession and developers consistently failed to meet their needs due to both poverty and racism. Attention is also paid to the most pressing concerns in Latino barrios during recent times, including environmental degradation and justice, land use policy, and others. The book closes with a consideration of the issues that will face Latinos as they become the nation's largest minority in the 21st century.

Sustainable Urbanism and Beyond

Author: Tigran Haas
Publisher: Rizzoli International Publications
ISBN: 9780847838363
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Architecture

A comprehensive examination of sustainable urbanism principles and practices and speculates about its future.

Sustainable Food Planning

Author: André Viljoen
Publisher: Wageningen Academic Pub
ISBN: 9789086861873
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Social Science

Planning for sustainable food production and consumption is becoming an increasingly important issue for planners, policymakers, designers, farmers, suppliers, activists, business and scientists alike. This book reviews and elaborates definitions of sustainable food systems and begins to define ways of achieving them.

The Landscape Urbanism Reader

Author: Charles Waldheim
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 9781568989495
Release Date: 2012-03-20
Genre: Architecture

In The Landscape Urbanism Reader Charles Waldheim—who is at the forefront of this new movement—has assembled the definitive collection of essays by many of the field's top practitioners. Fourteen essays written by leading figures across a range of disciplines and from around the world—including James Corner, Linda Pollak, Alan Berger, Pierre Bolanger, Julia Czerniak, and more—capture the origins, the contemporary milieu, and the aspirations of this relatively new field. The Landscape Urbanism Reader is an inspiring signal to the future of city making as well as an indispensable reference for students, teachers, architects, and urban planners.

Garden Cities

Author: Andres Duany
Publisher:
ISBN: 1906384053
Release Date: 2012
Genre: City planning


The Largest Art

Author: Brent D. Ryan
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262036672
Release Date: 2017-10-20
Genre: Architecture

Unitary architecture, plural cities -- Five dimensions of plural urbanism -- Three pluralist projects -- Three plural urbanists -- Designing pluralist urbanism : urban design scenarios for three places -- Principals and potentials of plural urbanism

Hypersexual City

Author: Nicole Kalms
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317028260
Release Date: 2017-03-31
Genre: Architecture

Much of feminist architectural scholarship focuses on the enormous task of instating women’s experience of space into spatial praxis. Hypersexual City: The Provocation of Soft-Core Urbanism suggests this attention to women’s invisibility in sociocultural space has overlooked the complex ways in which women already occupy space, albeit mostly as an image or object to be consumed, even purchased. It examines the occupation of urban space through the mediated representation of women’s hypersexualized bodies. A complex transaction proliferates in the commercial urban space of cities; this book seeks to address the cause and consequence of the increasing dominance of gendered representation. It uses architectural case studies and analysis to make visible the sexual politics of architecture and urbanism and, in doing so, reveal the ways that heterosexist culture shapes the spaces, behaviour and relationships formed in neoliberal cities. Hypersexual City announces how examining urbanism that operates through, and is framed by, sexual culture can demonstrate that architecture does not merely find itself adrift in the hypersexualized landscape of contemporary cities, but is actively producing and contributing to the sexual regulation of urban life.

Food and the City

Author: Dorothée Imbert
Publisher: Dumbarton Oaks Pub Service
ISBN: 0884024040
Release Date: 2015-03-20
Genre: Architecture

Food and the City explores the physical, social, and political relations between the production of food and urban settlements. Essays offer a variety of perspectives—from landscape and architectural history to geography—on the multiple scales and ideologies of productive landscapes across the globe from the sixteenth century to the present.

Cities and Inequalities in a Global and Neoliberal World

Author: Faranak Miraftab
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134521104
Release Date: 2015-04-24
Genre: Political Science

Cities continue to be key sites for the production and contestation of inequalities generated by an ongoing but troubled neoliberal project. Neoliberalism’s onslaught across the globe now shapes diverse inequalities -- poverty, segregation, racism, social exclusion, homelessness -- as city inhabitants feel the brunt of privatization, state re-organization, and punishing social policy. This book examines the relationship between persistent neoliberalism and the production and contestation of inequalities in cities across the world. Case studies of current city realities reveal a richly place-specific and generalizable neoliberal condition that further deepens the economic, social, and political relations that give rise to diverse inequalities. Diverse cases also show how people struggle against a neoliberal ethos and hence the open-endedness of futures in these cities.

Food Trucks Cultural Identity and Social Justice

Author: Julian Agyeman
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262036573
Release Date: 2017-09
Genre: Political Science

The food truck on the corner could be a brightly painted old-style lonchera offering tacos or an upscale mobile vendor serving lobster rolls. Customers range from gastro-tourists to construction workers, all eager for food that is delicious, authentic, and relatively inexpensive. Although some cities that host food trucks encourage their proliferation, others throw up regulatory roadblocks. This book examines the food truck phenomenon in North American cities from Los Angeles to Montreal, taking a novel perspective: social justice. It considers the motivating factors behind a city's promotion or restriction of mobile food vending, and how these motivations might connect to or impede broad goals of social justice. The contributors investigate the discriminatory implementation of rules, with gentrified hipsters often receiving preferential treatment over traditional immigrants; food trucks as part of community economic development; and food trucks' role in cultural identity formation. They describe, among other things, mobile food vending in Portland, Oregon, where relaxed permitting encourages street food; the criminalization of food trucks by Los Angeles and New York City health codes; food as cultural currency in Montreal; social and spatial bifurcation of food trucks in Chicago and Durham, North Carolina; and food trucks as a part of Vancouver, Canada's, self-branding as the "Greenest City." ContributorsJulian Agyeman, Sean Basinski, Jennifer Clark, Ana Croegaert, Kathleen Dunn, Renia Ehrenfeucht, Emma French, Matthew Gebhardt, Phoebe Godfrey, Amy Hanser, Robert Lemon, Nina Martin, Caitlin Matthews, Nathan McClintock, Alfonso Morales, Alan Nash, Katherine Alexandra Newman, Lenore Lauri Newman, Alex Novie, Matthew Shapiro, Hannah Sobel, Mark Vallianatos, Ginette Wessel, Edward Whittall, Mackenzie Wood