Frozen in Time

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 9780385743884
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

A young reader's adaptation of the author's adult biography, Birdseye: The Adventures of a Curious Man, describes the innovations that helped Clarence Birdseye revolutionize the frozen food industry and start the company that still bears his name. Simultaneous and eBook.

Clarence Birdseye

Author: Tiffany Peterson
Publisher: Heinemann-Raintree Library
ISBN: 1403432473
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Introduces the life of Clarence Birdseye, who invented a quick-freeze method to preserve the fresh flavor of food and founded the Birds Eye Frosted Foods company in 1929.

Deadly Diets

Author: Anita Croy
Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing LLLP
ISBN: 9781538226797
Release Date: 2018-07-15
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Did you know that an 18th century Swedish king ate himself to death at a feast? Or that Maria Callas swallowed a tapeworm to try to control her weight? People throughout the ages have turned to bizarre dietary regimes to shape their bodies. This book covers so many interesting moments in food history, from cannibals to fasting, moral diets to extreme weight loss, fad diets to war rationing, and the diagnosis of eating disorders to Elvis. At the same time, readers learn history, science, nutrition, and social studies. Sidebars bring extra fun to the chapters, and incredible full-color art makes each fact pop.

Clarence Birdseye Frozen Food Innovator

Author: Joanne Mattern
Publisher: ABDO
ISBN: 9781629688862
Release Date: 2015-01-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

In this title, unwrap the life of talented Birds Eye frozen foods innovator, Clarence Birdseye! Readers will enjoy getting the scoop on this Food Dude, beginning with his childhood in Brooklyn, New York. Students can follow Birdseye's success story from his education at Montclair High School to his career as a fur trader and life in Labrador, Canada. Birdseye's family and his retirement years are also highlighted. Engaging text familiarizes readers with topics of interest including Birdseye's inventions such as his patented Quick Freeze Machine and development of the frozen foods market. An entertaining sidebar, a helpful timeline, a glossary, and an index, supplement the historical and color photos showcased in this inspiring biography. Checkerboard Library is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.

Microwave Man

Author: Sara L. Latta
Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 9780766042018
Release Date: 2014-01-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Most people love microwave popcorn or a warm snack from the microwave, but before 1975, homes did not have this great device. How did Percy Spencer go from a small town mill worker to the inventor of one of the most popular devices in the world? Find out how Spencer's love of science and machines, along with his strong work ethic, helped him achieve a patent for the invention of the microwave oven.

Birdseye

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780767930307
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

A profile of eccentric genius inventor Clarence Birdseye chronicles how his innovative fast-freezing process revolutionized the food industry and American agriculture. By the best-selling author of Salt: A World History. 35,000 first printing.

A Curious Man

Author: Neal Thompson
Publisher: Crown Archetype
ISBN: 9780770436216
Release Date: 2013-05-07
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

A Curious Man is the marvelously compelling biography of Robert “Believe It or Not” Ripley, the enigmatic cartoonist turned globetrotting millionaire who won international fame by celebrating the world's strangest oddities, and whose outrageous showmanship taught us to believe in the unbelievable. As portrayed by acclaimed biographer Neal Thompson, Ripley’s life is the stuff of a classic American fairy tale. Buck-toothed and cursed by shyness, Ripley turned his sense of being an outsider into an appreciation for the strangeness of the world. After selling his first cartoon to Time magazine at age eighteen, more cartooning triumphs followed, but it was his “Believe It or Not” conceit and the wildly popular radio shows it birthed that would make him one of the most successful entertainment figures of his time and spur him to search the globe’s farthest corners for bizarre facts, exotic human curiosities, and shocking phenomena. Ripley delighted in making outrageous declarations that somehow always turned out to be true—such as that Charles Lindbergh was only the sixty-seventh man to fly across the Atlantic or that “The Star Spangled Banner” was not the national anthem. Assisted by an exotic harem of female admirers and by ex-banker Norbert Pearlroth, a devoted researcher who spoke eleven languages, Ripley simultaneously embodied the spirit of Peter Pan, the fearlessness of Marco Polo and the marketing savvy of P. T. Barnum. In a very real sense, Ripley sought to remake the world’s aesthetic. He demanded respect for those who were labeled “eccentrics” or “freaks”—whether it be E. L. Blystone, who wrote 1,615 alphabet letters on a grain of rice, or the man who could swallow his own nose. By the 1930s Ripley possessed a vast fortune, a private yacht, and a twenty-eight room mansion stocked with such “oddities” as shrunken heads and medieval torture devices, and his pioneering firsts in print, radio, and television were tapping into something deep in the American consciousness—a taste for the titillating and exotic, and a fascination with the fastest, biggest, dumbest and most weird. Today, that legacy continues and can be seen in reality TV, YouTube, America’s Funniest Home Videos, Jackass, MythBusters and a host of other pop-culture phenomena. In the end Robert L. Ripley changed everything. The supreme irony of his life, which was dedicated to exalting the strange and unusual, is that he may have been the most amazing oddity of all. From the Hardcover edition.

The Last Fish Tale

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 9780345507730
Release Date: 2008-06-03
Genre: History

The bestselling author of Cod, Salt, and The Big Oyster has enthralled readers with his incisive blend of culinary, cultural, and social history. Now, in his most colorful, personal, and important book to date, Mark Kurlansky turns his attention to a disappearing way of life: fishing–how it has thrived in and defined one particular town for centuries, and what its imperiled future means for the rest of the world. The culture of fishing is vanishing, and consequently, coastal societies are changing in unprecedented ways. The once thriving fishing communities of Rockport, Nantucket, Newport, Mystic, and many other coastal towns from Newfoundland to Florida and along the West Coast have been forced to abandon their roots and become tourist destinations instead. Gloucester, Massachusetts, however, is a rare survivor. The livelihood of America’s oldest fishing port has always been rooted in the life and culture of commercial fishing. The Gloucester story began in 1004 with the arrival of the Vikings. Six hundred years later, Captain John Smith championed the bountiful waters off the coast of Gloucester, convincing new settlers to come to the area and start a new way of life. Gloucester became the most productive fishery in New England, its people prospering from the seemingly endless supply of cod and halibut. With the introduction of a faster fishing boat–the schooner–the industry flourished. In the twentieth century, the arrival of Portuguese, Jews, and Sicilians turned the bustling center into a melting pot. Artists and writers such as Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer, and T. S. Eliot came to the fishing town and found inspiration. But the vital life of Gloucester was being threatened. Ominous signs were seen with the development of engine-powered net-dragging vessels in the first decade of the twentieth century. As early as 1911, Gloucester fishermen warned of the dire consequences of this new technology. Since then, these vessels have become even larger and more efficient, and today the resulting overfishing, along with climate change and pollution, portends the extinction of the very species that fishermen depend on to survive, and of a way of life special not only to Gloucester but to coastal cities all over the world. And yet, according to Kurlansky, it doesn’t have to be this way. Scientists, government regulators, and fishermen are trying to work out complex formulas to keep fishing alive. Engagingly written and filled with rich history, delicious anecdotes, colorful characters, and local recipes, The Last Fish Tale is Kurlansky’s most urgent story, a heartfelt tribute to what he calls “socio-diversity” and a lament that “each culture, each way of life that vanishes, diminishes the richness of civilization.” From the Hardcover edition.

A Square Meal

Author: Jane Ziegelman
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 9780062216434
Release Date: 2016-08-16
Genre: Cooking

From the author of the acclaimed 97 Orchard and her husband, a culinary historian, an in-depth exploration of the greatest food crisis the nation has ever faced—the Great Depression—and how it transformed America’s culinary culture. The decade-long Great Depression, a period of shifts in the country’s political and social landscape, forever changed the way America eats. Before 1929, America’s relationship with food was defined by abundance. But the collapse of the economy, in both urban and rural America, left a quarter of all Americans out of work and undernourished—shattering long-held assumptions about the limitlessness of the national larder. In 1933, as women struggled to feed their families, President Roosevelt reversed long-standing biases toward government-sponsored “food charity.” For the first time in American history, the federal government assumed, for a while, responsibility for feeding its citizens. The effects were widespread. Championed by Eleanor Roosevelt, “home economists” who had long fought to bring science into the kitchen rose to national stature. Tapping into America’s long-standing ambivalence toward culinary enjoyment, they imposed their vision of a sturdy, utilitarian cuisine on the American dinner table. Through the Bureau of Home Economics, these women led a sweeping campaign to instill dietary recommendations, the forerunners of today’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans. At the same time, rising food conglomerates introduced packaged and processed foods that gave rise to a new American cuisine based on speed and convenience. This movement toward a homogenized national cuisine sparked a revival of American regional cooking. In the ensuing decades, the tension between local traditions and culinary science has defined our national cuisine—a battle that continues today. A Square Meal examines the impact of economic contraction and environmental disaster on how Americans ate then—and the lessons and insights those experiences may hold for us today. A Square Meal features 25 black-and-white photographs.

World Without Fish

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Workman Publishing
ISBN: 9781523507092
Release Date: 2018-06-15
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

A KID’S GUIDE TO THE OCEAN "Can you imagine a world without fish? It's not as crazy as it sounds. But if we keep doing things the way we've been doing things, fish could become extinct within fifty years. So let's change the way we do things!" World Without Fish is the uniquely illustrated narrative nonfiction account—for kids—of what is happening to the world’s oceans and what they can do about it. Written by Mark Kurlansky, author of Cod, Salt, The Big Oyster, and many other books, World Without Fish has been praised as “urgent” (Publishers Weekly) and “a wonderfully fast-paced and engaging primer on the key questions surrounding fish and the sea” (Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish). It has also been included in the New York State Expeditionary Learning English Language Arts Curriculum. Written by a master storyteller, World Without Fish connects all the dots—biology, economics, evolution, politics, climate, history, culture, food, and nutrition—in a way that kids can really understand. It describes how the fish we most commonly eat, including tuna, salmon, cod, swordfish—even anchovies— could disappear within fifty years, and the domino effect it would have: the oceans teeming with jellyfish and turning pinkish orange from algal blooms, the seabirds disappearing, then reptiles, then mammals. It describes the back-and-forth dynamic of fishermen, who are the original environmentalists, and scientists, who not that long ago considered fish an endless resource. It explains why fish farming is not the answer—and why sustainable fishing is, and how to help return the oceans to their natural ecological balance. Interwoven with the book is a twelve-page graphic novel. Each beautifully illustrated chapter opener links to the next to form a larger fictional story that perfectly complements the text.

Salt

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Vintage Canada
ISBN: 9780307369796
Release Date: 2011-03-18
Genre: History

From the award-winning and bestselling author of Cod comes the dramatic, human story of a simple substance, an element almost as vital as water, that has created fortunes, provoked revolutions, directed economies and enlivened our recipes. Salt is common, easy to obtain and inexpensive. It is the stuff of kitchens and cooking. Yet trade routes were established, alliances built and empires secured – all for something that filled the oceans, bubbled up from springs, formed crusts in lake beds, and thickly veined a large part of the Earth’s rock fairly close to the surface. From pre-history until just a century ago – when the mysteries of salt were revealed by modern chemistry and geology – no one knew that salt was virtually everywhere. Accordingly, it was one of the most sought-after commodities in human history. Even today, salt is a major industry. Canada, Kurlansky tells us, is the world’s sixth largest salt producer, with salt works in Ontario playing a major role in satisfying the Americans’ insatiable demand. As he did in his highly acclaimed Cod, Mark Kurlansky once again illuminates the big picture by focusing on one seemingly modest detail. In the process, the world is revealed as never before. From the Hardcover edition.

The Big Oyster

Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781588365910
Release Date: 2007-01-09
Genre: History

Before New York City was the Big Apple, it could have been called the Big Oyster. Now award-winning author Mark Kurlansky tells the remarkable story of New York by following the trajectory of one of its most fascinating inhabitants–the oyster, whose influence on the great metropolis remains unparalleled. For centuries New York was famous for its oysters, which until the early 1900s played such a dominant a role in the city’s economy, gastronomy, and ecology that the abundant bivalves were Gotham’s most celebrated export, a staple food for the wealthy, the poor, and tourists alike, and the primary natural defense against pollution for the city’s congested waterways. Filled with cultural, historical, and culinary insight–along with historic recipes, maps, drawings, and photos–this dynamic narrative sweeps readers from the island hunting ground of the Lenape Indians to the death of the oyster beds and the rise of America’s environmentalist movement, from the oyster cellars of the rough-and-tumble Five Points slums to Manhattan’s Gilded Age dining chambers. Kurlansky brings characters vividly to life while recounting dramatic incidents that changed the course of New York history. Here are the stories behind Peter Stuyvesant’s peg leg and Robert Fulton’s “Folly”; the oyster merchant and pioneering African American leader Thomas Downing; the birth of the business lunch at Delmonico’s; early feminist Fanny Fern, one of the highest-paid newspaper writers in the city; even “Diamond” Jim Brady, who we discover was not the gourmand of popular legend. With The Big Oyster, Mark Kurlansky serves up history at its most engrossing, entertaining, and delicious. From the Hardcover edition.

Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science

Author: Martin Gardner
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 9780486131627
Release Date: 2012-05-04
Genre: Science

Fair, witty appraisal of cranks, quacks, and quackeries of science and pseudoscience: hollow earth, Velikovsky, orgone energy, Dianetics, flying saucers, Bridey Murphy, food and medical fads, and much more.

Made to Break

Author: Giles Slade
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674043756
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Technology & Engineering

Made to Break is a history of twentieth-century technology as seen through the prism of obsolescence. Giles Slade explains how disposability was a necessary condition for America's rejection of tradition and our acceptance of change and impermanence. This book gives us a detailed and harrowing picture of how, by choosing to support ever-shorter product lives, we may well be shortening the future of our way of life as well.

The Last Professors

Author: Frank Donoghue
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823228592
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Education

Taking a clear-eyed look at American higher education over the last twenty years, Donoghue outlines a web of forces--social, political, and institutional--dismantling the professoriate. Today, fewer than 30 percent of college and university teachers are tenured or on tenure tracks, and signs point to a future where professors will disappear. --from publisher description