Golden Rule

Author: Thomas Ferguson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226162010
Release Date: 2011-08-15
Genre: Political Science

"To discover who rules, follow the gold." This is the argument of Golden Rule, a provocative, pungent history of modern American politics. Although the role big money plays in defining political outcomes has long been obvious to ordinary Americans, most pundits and scholars have virtually dismissed this assumption. Even in light of skyrocketing campaign costs, the belief that major financial interests primarily determine who parties nominate and where they stand on the issues—that, in effect, Democrats and Republicans are merely the left and right wings of the "Property Party"—has been ignored by most political scientists. Offering evidence ranging from the nineteenth century to the 1994 mid-term elections, Golden Rule shows that voters are "right on the money." Thomas Ferguson breaks completely with traditional voter centered accounts of party politics. In its place he outlines an "investment approach," in which powerful investors, not unorganized voters, dominate campaigns and elections. Because businesses "invest" in political parties and their candidates, changes in industrial structures—between large firms and sectors—can alter the agenda of party politics and the shape of public policy. Golden Rule presents revised versions of widely read essays in which Ferguson advanced and tested his theory, including his seminal study of the role played by capital intensive multinationals and international financiers in the New Deal. The chapter "Studies in Money Driven Politics" brings this aspect of American politics into better focus, along with other studies of Federal Reserve policy making and campaign finance in the 1936 election. Ferguson analyzes how a changing world economy and other social developments broke up the New Deal system in our own time, through careful studies of the 1988 and 1992 elections. The essay on 1992 contains an extended analysis of the emergence of the Clinton coalition and Ross Perot's dramatic independent insurgency. A postscript on the 1994 elections demonstrates the controlling impact of money on several key campaigns. This controversial work by a theorist of money and politics in the U.S. relates to issues in campaign finance reform, PACs, policymaking, public financing, and how today's elections work.

Right Turn

Author: Thomas Ferguson
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809001705
Release Date: 1987-08-01
Genre: Political Science


The Hidden election

Author: Thomas Ferguson
Publisher: Pantheon
ISBN: UOM:39015035338436
Release Date: 1981
Genre: Political Science

Eight essays analyze the political and economic underpinnings of the 1980 presidential election and focus on relations between the power centers in American society and political events

Money and Free Speech

Author: Melvin I. Urofsky
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015062578607
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Law

Money greases the wheels of American politics from the local level to the White House. In the 2004 presidential campaign, President George W. Bush alone raised nearly $400 million in private and public funds—nearly twenty times the combined total raised by John Kennedy and Richard Nixon in 1960—to defeat challenger John F. Kerry, further fueling anxiety over the power of money to dictate political results. Melvin Urofsky, one of our nation's most respected legal historians, takes a fresh look at efforts to rein in campaign spending and counter efforts in the courts to preserve the status quo. He offers a thoughtful and balanced overview of campaign finance reform and the legal responses to it, from the Progressive era through the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in McConnell v. FEC (2003) and its impact on the 2004 election. Urofsky focuses especially on the 1971 Federal Election Campaign Act and 2002 McCain-Feingold or Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA), and on challenges to both in the Supreme Court. In Buckley v. Valeo (1976), the Court upheld contribution limits but struck down expenditure caps on First Amendment grounds. In McConnell it upheld the key provisions of McCain-Feingold. In both cases, however, opponents argued that congressional control of campaign financing was an unconstitutional infringement of the free speech rights of campaign contributors. Urofsky deftly steers the reader through this contentious and complex history, revealing how both Congress and the courts have navigated uneasily between the Scylla of potential corruption and the Charybdis of suppressing political speech. Ironically, despite the Court's decision upholding McCain-Feingold, the 2004 presidential election was the most expensive in history—because, as Urofsky notes, money is the mother's milk of politics and both candidates and donors will always find ways to keep it flowing. His book provides an excellent and succinct guide to the controversies and historical debates emerging from that fact.

Why Parties

Author: John H. Aldrich
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226012759
Release Date: 2012-07-24
Genre: Political Science

Since its first appearance fifteen years ago, Why Parties? has become essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the nature of American political parties. In the interim, the party system has undergone some radical changes. In this landmark book, now rewritten for the new millennium, John H. Aldrich goes beyond the clamor of arguments over whether American political parties are in resurgence or decline and undertakes a wholesale reexamination of the foundations of the American party system. Surveying critical episodes in the development of American political parties—from their formation in the 1790s to the Civil War—Aldrich shows how they serve to combat three fundamental problems of democracy: how to regulate the number of people seeking public office, how to mobilize voters, and how to achieve and maintain the majorities needed to accomplish goals once in office. Aldrich brings this innovative account up to the present by looking at the profound changes in the character of political parties since World War II, especially in light of ongoing contemporary transformations, including the rise of the Republican Party in the South, and what those changes accomplish, such as the Obama Health Care plan. Finally, Why Parties? A Second Look offers a fuller consideration of party systems in general, especially the two-party system in the United States, and explains why this system is necessary for effective democracy.

Think Tanks in America

Author: Thomas Medvetz
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226517292
Release Date: 2012-09-06
Genre: History

Over the past half-century, think tanks have become fixtures of American politics, supplying advice to presidents and policy makers, expert testimony on Capitol Hill, and convenient facts and figures to journalists and media specialists. But what are think tanks? Who funds them? What kind of “research” do they produce? Where does their authority come from? And how influential have they become? In Think Tanks in America, Thomas Medvetz argues that the unsettling ambiguity of the think tank is less an accidental feature of its existence than the very key to its impact. By combining elements of more established sources of public knowledge—universities, government agencies, businesses, and the media—think tanks exert a tremendous amount of influence on the way citizens and lawmakers perceive the world, unbound by the more clearly defined roles of those other institutions. In the process, they transform the government of this country, the press, and the political role of intellectuals. Timely, succinct, and instructive, this provocative book will force us to rethink our understanding of the drivers of political debate in the United States.

Boundaries of the State in US History

Author: James T. Sparrow
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226277813
Release Date: 2015-09-07
Genre: History

The question of how the American state defines its power has become central to a range of historical topics, from the founding of the Republic and the role of the educational system to the functions of agencies and America’s place in the world. Yet conventional histories of the state have not reckoned adequately with the roots of an ever-expanding governmental power, assuming instead that the American state was historically and exceptionally weak relative to its European peers. Here, James T. Sparrow, William J. Novak, and Stephen W. Sawyer assemble definitional essays that search for explanations to account for the extraordinary growth of US power without resorting to exceptionalist narratives. Turning away from abstract, metaphysical questions about what the state is, or schematic models of how it must work, these essays focus instead on the more pragmatic, historical question of what it does. By historicizing the construction of the boundaries dividing America and the world, civil society and the state, they are able to explain the dynamism and flexibility of a government whose powers appear so natural as to be given, invisible, inevitable, and exceptional.

Seeking Equality The Political Economy of the Common Good in the United States and Canada

Author: John Harles
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9781442634312
Release Date:
Genre:

Income inequality has increased in almost all advanced industrial economies in recent decades. The United States and Canada have been at the forefront of this trend, although the gap between the “haves” and the “have-nots” is substantially greater in the US. Rates of social mobility are also much lower in the United States than in Canada, making it more difficult for Americans to move up the ladder of economic success independent of who their parents happen to be. In Seeking Equality, John Harles considers the factors accounting for these cross-border differences. He surveys in considerable detail what is known about economic inequality in the United States and Canada and compares the respective political values that both shape and are shaped by ameliorative public policies. His comparison reveals important lessons for creating a healthier, more productive, cohesive, democratic, and just society.

The Price of Inequality How Today s Divided Society Endangers Our Future

Author: Joseph E. Stiglitz
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393088694
Release Date: 2012-06-11
Genre: Business & Economics

Examines how the wealthy classes have contributed to growing inequality in society and explains how the quest to increase wealth has hindered the country's economic growth as well as its efforts to solve its most pressing economic problems.

Monetary Economies of Production

Author: Louis-Philippe Rochon
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 9781781003954
Release Date: 2013-09-30
Genre: Business & Economics

With its central focus on money and its link with the production sphere, this book explores how best to adapt the fundamental ideas of the circulationist perspective to achieve a better understanding of the financialisation of the productive apparatus

Capitalism Unleashed

Author: Andrew Glyn
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199226795
Release Date: 2007-07-05
Genre: Business & Economics

Free enterprise is off the leash and is chasing opportunities for profit making across the globe. Challenging the notion of capitalist destiny, this text questions whether capitalism really has brought the levels of economic growth and prosperity that were hoped for.

The General Theory of Employment Interest and Money

Author: John Maynard Keynes
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9783319703442
Release Date: 2018-07-20
Genre: Business & Economics

This book was originally published by Macmillan in 1936. It was voted the top Academic Book that Shaped Modern Britain by Academic Book Week (UK) in 2017, and in 2011 was placed on Time Magazine's top 100 non-fiction books written in English since 1923. Reissued with a fresh Introduction by the Nobel-prize winner Paul Krugman and a new Afterword by Keynes’ biographer Robert Skidelsky, this important work is made available to a new generation. The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money transformed economics and changed the face of modern macroeconomics. Keynes’ argument is based on the idea that the level of employment is not determined by the price of labour, but by the spending of money. It gave way to an entirely new approach where employment, inflation and the market economy are concerned. Highly provocative at its time of publication, this book and Keynes’ theories continue to remain the subject of much support and praise, criticism and debate. Economists at any stage in their career will enjoy revisiting this treatise and observing the relevance of Keynes’ work in today’s contemporary climate.

The American Political Economy

Author: Douglas A. HIBBS
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674027361
Release Date: 1989-03-01
Genre: Political Science

The most comprehensive and authoritative work to date on relationships between the economy and politics in the years from Eisenhower through Reagan. Hibbs identifies which groups "win" and "lose" from inflations and recessions and shows how voters' perceptions and reactions to economic events affect the electoral fortunes of political parties and presidents.

Brokers Voters and Clientelism

Author: Susan C. Stokes
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107042209
Release Date: 2013-09-23
Genre: Political Science

Brokers, Voters, and Clientelism studies distributive politics: how parties and governments use material resources to win elections. The authors develop a theory that explains why loyal supporters, rather than swing voters, tend to benefit from pork-barrel politics; why poverty encourages clientelism and vote buying; and why redistribution and voter participation do not justify non-programmatic distribution.

Analyzing the Global Political Economy

Author: Andrew Walter
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400837804
Release Date: 2008-12-08
Genre: Political Science

Ideally suited to upper-undergraduate and graduate students, Analyzing the Global Political Economy critically assesses the convergence between IPE, comparative political economy, and economics. Andrew Walter and Gautam Sen show that a careful engagement with economics is essential for understanding both contemporary IPE and for analyzing the global political economy. The authors also argue that the deployment of more advanced economic theories should not detract from the continuing importance for IPE of key concepts from political science and international relations. IPE students with little or no background in economics will therefore find this book useful, and economics students interested in political economy will be alerted to the comparative strengths of political science and other social science disciplines. A concise look at the foundations of analysis in the political economy of global trade, money, finance, and investment Suitable for upper-undergraduate and graduate students with some or no economic background Techniques and findings from a range of academic disciplines, including international relations, political science, economics, sociology, and history Further reading and useful weblinks including a range of relevant data sources, listed in each chapter