Granville Sharp s Cases on Slavery

Author: Andrew Lyall
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781509911226
Release Date: 2017-03-23
Genre: Law

The purpose of Granville Sharpe's Cases on Slavery is twofold: first, to publish previously unpublished legal materials principally in three important cases in the 18th century on the issue of slavery in England, and specifically the status of black people who were slaves in the American colonies or the West Indies and who were taken to England by their masters. The unpublished materials are mostly verbatim transcripts made by shorthand writers commissioned by Granville Sharp, one of the first Englishmen to take up the cause of the abolition of the slave trade and slavery itself. Other related unpublished material is also made available for the first time, including an opinion of an attorney general and some minor cases from the library of York Minster. On the slave ship Zong, there are transcripts of the original declaration, the deposition by the chief mate, James Kelsall and an extract from a manuscript that Professor Martin Dockray was working on before his untimely death. The second purpose, outlined in the Introduction, is to give a social and legal background to the cases and an analysis of the position in England of black servants/slaves brought to England and the legal effects of the cases, taking into account the new information provided by the transcripts. There was a conflict in legal authorities as to whether black servants remained slaves, or became free on arrival in England. Lord Mansfield, the chief justice of the court of King's Bench, was a central figure in all the cases and clearly struggled to come to terms with slavery. The material provides a basis for tracing the evolution of his thought on the subject. On the one hand, the huge profits from slave production in the West Indies flooded into England, slave owners had penetrated the leading institutions in England and the pro-slavery lobby was influential. On the other hand, English law had over time established rights and liberties which in the 18th century were seen by many as national characteristics. That tradition was bolstered by the ideas of the Enlightenment. By about the 1760s it had become clear that there was no property in the person, and by the 1770s that such servants could not be sent abroad without their consent, but whether they owed an obligation of perpetual service remained unresolved.

Rough Crossings

Author: Simon Schama
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061914607
Release Date: 2009-04-28
Genre: History

If you were black in America at the start of the Revolutionary War, which side would you want to win? When the last British governor of Virginia declared that any rebel-owned slave who escaped and served the king would be emancipated, tens of thousands of slaves fled from farms, plantations, and cities to try to reach the British camp. A military strategy originally designed to break the plantations of the American South had unleashed one of the great exoduses in U.S. history. With powerfully vivid storytelling, Schama details the odyssey of the escaped blacks through the fires of war and the terror of potential recapture, shedding light on an extraordinary, little-known chapter in the dark saga of American slavery.

The Historical Encyclopedia of World Slavery

Author: Junius P. Rodriguez
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780874368857
Release Date: 1997-01-01
Genre: History

Looks at historical arguments made for slavery and abolition, slavery systems in various countries, related legal cases, slave rebellions, slave biographies, the history of the slave trade, and the teachings of various religions concerning slavery

The Igbo and Their Niger Delta Neighbors

Author: Nnamdi J. O. Ijeaku
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 9781441525451
Release Date: 2009
Genre: History

This book is about Nigeria's oil and gas-rich Niger Delta region: --how its peoples: the Igbo, Ijaw, Ibibio, Efik, Ogoni, Annang, etc evolved over the years; with the Igbo, as the main ingredient in the evolution process --how ethnic and regional rivalry, occasioned by petty jealousies and envy threatened their very existence in1966-1969, and led to Biafra --how greed and the gross abuse of state power by Northern Nigeria-controlled military dictatorship in 1966-1999 turned the once prosperous region into a living nightmare. The peoples are emasculated, communities/villages sacked, perceived freedom fighters persecuted and killed, including the writer/environmentalist, Ken Saro-Wiwa, who was hanged in 1995. This book reminds Nigeria and the world of Biafra, and calls for fundamental changes in respect of the Niger Delta, to avoid the mistakes that led to Biafran secession in 1967. It is also a Unity call to the East.

Specters of the Atlantic

Author: Ian Baucom
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822387022
Release Date: 2005-11-25
Genre: Literary Criticism

In September 1781, the captain of the British slave ship Zong ordered 133 slaves thrown overboard, enabling the ship’s owners to file an insurance claim for their lost “cargo.” Accounts of this horrific event quickly became a staple of abolitionist discourse on both sides of the Atlantic. Ian Baucom revisits, in unprecedented detail, the Zong atrocity, the ensuing court cases, reactions to the event and trials, and the business and social dealings of the Liverpool merchants who owned the ship. Drawing on the work of an astonishing array of literary and social theorists, including Walter Benjamin, Giovanni Arrighi, Jacques Derrida, and many others, he argues that the tragedy is central not only to the trans-Atlantic slave trade and the political and cultural archives of the black Atlantic but also to the history of modern capital and ethics. To apprehend the Zong tragedy, Baucom suggests, is not to come to terms with an isolated atrocity but to encounter a logic of violence key to the unfolding history of Atlantic modernity. Baucom contends that the massacre and the trials that followed it bring to light an Atlantic cycle of capital accumulation based on speculative finance, an economic cycle that has not yet run its course. The extraordinarily abstract nature of today’s finance capital is the late-eighteenth-century system intensified. Yet, as Baucom highlights, since the late 1700s, this rapacious speculative culture has had detractors. He traces the emergence and development of a counter-discourse he calls melancholy realism through abolitionist and human-rights texts, British romantic poetry, Scottish moral philosophy, and the work of late-twentieth-century literary theorists. In revealing how the Zong tragedy resonates within contemporary financial systems and human-rights discourses, Baucom puts forth a deeply compelling, utterly original theory of history: one that insists that an eighteenth-century atrocity is not past but present within the future we now inhabit.

The Clapham Sect

Author: Stephen Tomkins
Publisher: Lion Books
ISBN: 9780745957395
Release Date: 2012-09-12
Genre: Religion

The Clapham Sect was a group of evangelical Christians, prominent in England from about 1790 to 1830, who campaigned for the abolition of slavery and promoted missionary work at home and abroad. The group centred on the church of John Venn, rector of Clapham in south London. Its members included William Wilberforce, Henry Thornton, James Stephen, Zachary Macaulay and others. Stephen Tomkins tells the fascinating story of the group as one of a web of family relations - father and son, aunt and nephew, husband and wife, daughter and father, cousins, etc. Within the story of the people are the stories of their famous campaigns against the slave trade, then slavery, the Sierra Leone colony, Indian mission, home mission, charity and politics. The book ends by assessing the long term influence of the Clapham Sect on Victorian Britain and the Empire.

History of Slavery

Author: Susanne Everett
Publisher: Chartwell Books
ISBN: 1555217680
Release Date: 2014-04-03
Genre: History

History of Slavery tells the story of the development of slavery, describing the trans-Atlantic trade that brought 11 million slaves from Africa to the Americas in the course of 300 years and reviews the life of the salves under the forcible subjugation and exploitation by other human beings. In strictly objective terms, this book deals with the historical controversies that have surrounded the study of slavery. Illustrated with over 300 pictures, including 40 in full color, drawn from archives around the world to highlight vital facets of the subject; it also includes eyewitness accounts and other documentary evidence that complement the text. The book also traces the history of the abolition movement, beginning in eighteenth-century England (one of the prime moves in establishing the slave trade in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries). This humanitarian philosophy is now taken for granted (at least officially) by every nation on earth. The author, Susanne Everett, also reviews those societies that did not readily accept abolition - the Arabs, who ravaged East Africa for slaves until well into this century, the Belgians, who initiated a reign of terror in the Congo in the late nineteenth century, and the Southerners who struggled to preserve their dominant position through the confrontations of Civil Rights. The book concludes with a reminder that slavery remains a vital issue today. Slave labor was imposed by the Russians and Germans during the Second World War and there are isolated instances - in South America and parts of Africa - that require continued policing by Anti-Slavery Commission of the United Nations.History of Slavery is a comprehensive, thoroughly illustrated account of human bondage, and an essential volume for everyone concerned with society and man's part in it.