Handbook of the Indians of California

Author: Alfred Louis Kroeber
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486233685
Release Date: 1925
Genre: History

A major ethnographic work by a distinguished anthropologist contains detailed information on the social structures, homes, foods, crafts, religious beliefs, and folkways of California's diverse tribes

Stone Age Spear and Arrow Points of California and the Great Basin

Author: Noel D. Justice
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253108837
Release Date: 2002-05-23
Genre: Social Science

Noel Justice adds another regional guide to his series of important reference works that survey, describe, and categorize the projectile point and cutting tools used in prehistory by Native American peoples. This volume addresses the region of California and the Great Basin. Written for archaeologists and amateur collectors alike, the book describes over 50 types of stone arrowhead and spear points according to period, culture, and region. With the knowledge of someone trained to fashion projectile points with techniques used by the Indians, Justice describes how the points were made, used, and re-sharpened. His detailed drawings illustrate the way the Indians shaped their tools, what styles were peculiar to which regions, and how the various types can best be identified. There are hundreds of drawings, organized by type cluster and other identifying characteristics. The book also includes distribution maps and color plates that will further aid the researcher or collector in identifying specific periods, cultures, and projectile types.

California Indians and Their Environment

Author: Kent G. Lightfoot
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520244719
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Nature

"Relevant, timely, and approachable, California Indians and Their Environment is an instant classic that should be invaluable for anyone interested in California's diverse natural and cultural landscapes and the future sustainability of the state."--Torben Rick, author of Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective "California Indians and Their Environment stands respectfully on the shoulders of scholarly giants and demonstrates the cumulative power of cultural, historical, and scientific research. It is a remarkably inclusive and relevant text that is both highly informative of past indigenous life ways and identities and strikingly insightful into current environmental crises that confront us all."--Seth Mallios, author of The Deadly Politics of Giving: Exchange and Violence at Ajacan, Roanoke, and Jamestown "In this highly readable and insightful book, Lightfoot and Parrish show how the natural diversity of California not only influenced the contours of Indian lifeways, but was indeed augmented by burning and other practices, that were used to sustain indigenous economies. The ingenuity and skill with which California Indians managed and used natural resources underscores the need to infuse modern land-use policy with the knowledge of people whose ecological experiences in North America eclipse those of Euroamericans by a factor of forty."--Kenneth E. Sassaman, author of People of the Shoals: Stallings Culture of the Savannah River Valley "This book is a deeply informative and fascinating examination of California Indians' rich and complex relationship with the ecological landscape. Lightfoot and Parrish have thoroughly updated the classic book, The Natural World of the California Indians, with critical analysis of anthropological theory and methods and incorporation of indigenous knowledge and practices. It is a lucid, accessible book that tells an intriguing story for our modern times."--Melissa K. Nelson, San Francisco State University and President of The Cultural Conservancy "At once scholarly and accessible, this book is destined to be a classic. Framed around pressing environmental issues of concern to a broad range of Californians today, Lightfoot and Parrish provide an historical ecology of California's amazingly diverse environments, its biological resources, and the Native peoples who both adapted to and actively managed them."--Jon M. Erlandson, author of Early Hunter-Gatherers of the California Coast "California Indians and Their Environment fills a significant gap in our understanding of the first peoples of California. Lightfoot and Parrish take on the daunting task of synthesizing and expanding on our knowledge of indigenous land-management practices, sustainable economies, and the use of natural resources for food, medicine, and technological needs. This innovative and thought-provoking book is highly recommended to anyone who wants to learn more about the diverse traditions of California Indians."--Lynn Gamble, author of The Chumash World at European Contact "This innovative book moves understanding of the Native Peoples of California from the past to the future. The authors' insight into Native Californians as fire managers is an eye-opener to interpreting the ecological and cultural uniqueness of the region. Lightfoot and Parrish have provided the best introduction to Native California while at the same time advancing the best scholarship with an original synthesis. A rare feat!"--William Simmons, Brown University

California Archaeology

Author: Michael J. Moratto
Publisher: Academic Press
ISBN: 9781483277356
Release Date: 2014-05-10
Genre: History

California Archaeology provides a compilation of knowledge for archeologists who are not California specialists. This book explains important cultural events and patterns discovered archeologically. Organized into 11 chapters, this book begins with an overview of California's historic and ancient environments as well as the evidence of Pleistocene human activity. This text then examines the glacial and other environmental conditions that would have influenced the origins, adaptations, and spread of the earliest North Americans. Other chapters consider how California's past is relevant to a wider understanding of human behavior. This book discusses as well the perceptions of Central Coast and San Francisco Bay region prehistory that have changed rapidly as a result of intensive fieldwork performed to comply with environmental law. The final chapter deals with the data of historical linguistics, which indicate something of the cultural relationships and events that might have occurred in the past. This book is a valuable resource for archeologists.

Mukat s People

Author: Lowell J. Bean
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520026276
Release Date: 1974-08-20
Genre: History

From the Introduction by Lowell J. Bean:An apparent dichotomy exists in scientific circles concerning the role of religion and belief systems and a similar dichotomy exists among anthropological theorists. Two assumptions seem to prevail: ritual and world view are more ecologically nonadaptive than adaptive; or ritual and world view are more ecologically adaptive than they are nonadaptive. To examine the relevancy of the opposing theoretical views I will develop hypotheses concerning a particular culture, the Cahuilla Indians of Southern California, which will be used as a test case. I will present two sets of hypotheses which logically follow from each of the assumptions. From the first assumption I suggest that the economic needs of society are impeded by ritual actions which are not only wasteful of productive goods but decrease the production of goods; they take people away from productive activities because of ritual obligations: and . from the second I suggest that the economic needs of society are impeded by normative and existential postulates (for definition see page 16o) which indicate that valuable resources are outside the realm of the economic order; these postulates are disruptive to the production of goods by encouraging people to behave in such a way that they are taken away from productive activity. From this latter viewpoint two other hypotheses follow: the ecoiwmic needs of society are facilitated by ritual action which conserves and increases the production of goods and fosters productive activity by directing personnel toward producing activities; and the economic needs of society are facilitated by normative and existential postulates which foster the use of valuable economic resources and increase the productive process by directing behavior which involves people in productive activities. The validity of the hypotheses will be tested by asking specific questions related to the hypotheses. The questions are:Were goods wasted because of ritual action? Did ritual action take people away from productive activities or did it direct people to produce more goods? Were valuable resources placed outside the realm of economic order by existential postulates? Did normative postulates disrupt the production of goods by rewarding behavior which took people away from productive activity? Or did it reward behavior which fostered the production of goods? Additional questions are: Did ritual and world view encourage the full and rational use of the Cahuilla environment? Did ritual and world view aid in adjusting man-land ratios? Did ritual and world view support a social structure and organization which was adaptive to an environmental base? Did ritual and world view support institutions that were adaptive, such as law, property concepts, warfare, and games? Did ritual and world view have regulatory functions? Did ritual and world view stimulate or facilitate the distribution of economic goods from one part of the system to another? Did ritual and world view limit the frequency and extent of conflict over valuable resources?

California Place Names

Author: Erwin G. Gudde
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520266193
Release Date: 2010-02-10
Genre: History

This anniversary edition concentrates on the origins of the names currently used for the cities, towns, settlements, mountains, and streams of California, with engrossing accounts of the history of their usage. The dictionary includes a glossary and a bibliography.

Tribes of California

Author: Stephen Powers
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520031725
Release Date: 1976
Genre: History

This classic of American Indian ethnography, originally published in 1877, is again available in its complete form. In the summers of 1871 and 1872 Powers visited Indian groups in the northern two-thirds of California. A journalist by profession, he was untrained in ethnography, but was nonetheless an astonishingly intelligent observer who had a gift for writing in a spirited manner. He reported faithfully what he heard and portrayed accurately what he saw among the native survivors of Gold Rush days in a series of seventeen articles published mostly in The Overland Monthly. These were partly unwritten, added to, and reorganized by Powers to be published in 1877 as a report of the U.S. Geographical Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region. Powers’ book is still basic and is referred to by everyone who deals with native cultures. The 1877 edition was not large, and Tribes of California is at last reprinted in response to growing demand for this rare volume. For this edition all of the original illustrations have been retained and the basic text printed in facsimile. Professor Robert F. Heizer has provided annotations throughout and an introduction to indicate contemporary thought about the volume.

Miwok Means People

Author: Eugene Conrotto
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1533221790
Release Date: 2016-06-13
Genre:

Imagine you live in a self-contained village where your parents and their parents and all your forebears from the beginning of time have lived. Imagine that within a day's walking distance from your village are the villages of other People-to the east and west and north and south. They are PEOPLE because they speak words you mainly understand. There are in these foothills 9000 such PEOPLE. Then imagine that in the space of a few months 90,000 ûyeayû-white men-come uninvited to all the PEOPLE'S villages to tear away the ground under the PEOPLE'S feet looking for rocks. For each one of you there are 10 of them. Imagine!

Countering Colonization

Author: Carol Devens
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520075579
Release Date: 1992
Genre: History

With Countering Colonization, Carol Devens offers a well-documented, revisionary history of Native American women. From the time of early Jesuit missionaries to the late nineteenth century, Devens brings Ojibwa, Cree, and Montagnais-Naskapi women of the Upper Great Lakes region to the fore. Far from being passive observers without regard for status and autonomy, these women were pivotal in their own communities and active in shaping the encounter between Native American and white civilizations. While women's voices have been silenced in most accounts, their actions preserved in missionary letters and reports indicate the vital part women played during centuries of conflict. In contrast to some Indian men who accepted the missionaries' religious and secular teachings as useful tools for dealing with whites, many Indian women felt a strong threat to their ways of life and beliefs. Women endured torture and hardship, and even torched missionaries' homes in an attempt to reassert control over their lives. Devens demonstrates that gender conflicts in Native American communities, which anthropologists considered to be "aboriginal," resulted in large part from women's and men's divergence over the acceptance of missionaries and their message. This book's perspective is unique in its focus on Native American women who acted to preserve their culture. In acknowledging these women as historically significant actors, Devens has written a work for every scholar and student seeking a more inclusive understanding of the North American past. With Countering Colonization, Carol Devens offers a well-documented, revisionary history of Native American women. From the time of early Jesuit missionaries to the late nineteenth century, Devens brings Ojibwa, Cree, and Montagnais-Naskapi women of the Upper Great Lakes region to the fore. Far from being passive observers without regard for status and autonomy, these women were pivotal in their own communities and active in shaping the encounter between Native American and white civilizations. While women's voices have been silenced in most accounts, their actions preserved in missionary letters and reports indicate the vital part women played during centuries of conflict. In contrast to some Indian men who accepted the missionaries' religious and secular teachings as useful tools for dealing with whites, many Indian women felt a strong threat to their ways of life and beliefs. Women endured torture and hardship, and even torched missionaries' homes in an attempt to reassert control over their lives. Devens demonstrates that gender conflicts in Native American communities, which anthropologists considered to be "aboriginal," resulted in large part from women's and men's divergence over the acceptance of missionaries and their message. This book's perspective is unique in its focus on Native American women who acted to preserve their culture. In acknowledging these women as historically significant actors, Devens has written a work for every scholar and student seeking a more inclusive understanding of the North American past.

California Prehistory

Author: Terry L. Jones
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 9780759113749
Release Date: 2007-07-16
Genre: Social Science

Reader of original synthesizing articles for introductory courses on archaeology and native peoples of California.

A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians

Author: Thomas Biolsi
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781405156127
Release Date: 2008-04-15
Genre: Social Science

This Companion is comprised of 27 original contributions by leading scholars in the field and summarizes the state of anthropological knowledge of Indian peoples, as well as the history that got us to this point. Surveys the full range of American Indian anthropology: from ecological and political-economic questions to topics concerning religion, language, and expressive culture Each chapter provides definitive coverage of its topic, as well as situating ethnographic and ethnohistorical data into larger frameworks Explores anthropology’s contribution to knowledge, its historic and ongoing complicities with colonialism, and its political and ethical obligations toward the people 'studied'

The Archaeology and Pottery of Nazca Peru

Author: Alfred Louis Kroeber
Publisher: Rowman Altamira
ISBN: 0761989641
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Social Science

"When Alfred Kroeber left Lima, Peru for the ruins of the Nazca region in July 1926, he could have no inkling of the importance of what he would uncover. Nor would he have guessed that his excavation report would not appear until the end of the century. The life history of Kroeber's excavation report, left unfinished upon his death in 1960 and completed by Donald Collier and Patrick Carmichael, is a story of its own. But The Archaeology and Pottery of Nazca, Peru is not just a historical curiosity for those interested in the life and work of one of the founders of Americanist anthropology. Kroeber's report contains what is still the only complete analysis and seriation of the beautiful painted pottery of Nazca, complete with over 400 photographs and drawings of objects uncovered in the excavations, and an additional 32 in full color. His report is also notable for its rare discussion of Nazca architecture, its description of cloth, hair bundles and other artifact groups, its accurate analysis of Nazca human remains, and even for one of the earliest descriptions and photographs of the famous Nazca lines. In all, The Archaeology and Pottery of Nazca, Peru is an important information source on South American prehistory and an historic last work of one of the giants of anthropology."--BOOK JACKET.