A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns

Author: Don C. East
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 9781440101540
Release Date: 2008-12
Genre: History

The story of the Hillabees has been both the Cinderella and the Rodney Dangerfield of Creek Indian history. Until now, it has been neglected and has garnered little respect. But author Don C. East changes that in this extensive historical look at the rise and fall of the Hillabee faction of the Creek Indian tribe and its existence in Clay County, Alabama. Based on research, personal experience, and supplemented with maps and illustrations, A Historical Analysis of the Creek Indian Hillabee Towns uncovers a wealth of new information on these towns, their residents, the Creeks in general, and other Indian and white characters of the period. East's working knowledge of the Creek language produces new information on the meanings of many Creek Indian names and words associated with the Hillabees. Born and raised in the area, being of Creek Indian ancestry, and spending all of his youth and young adult years there, he has a deep personal understanding of the Hillabee Creek Indians and Clay County. The Creek Hillabees may have had a history of less than 300 years, but they secured an important and prominent place in Creek and local pioneer white history during that time frame.

Creek Indian History

Author: George Stiggins
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817350017
Release Date: 2003-01-22
Genre: History

Based on a handwritten manuscript more than 150 years old, Creek Indian History is a primary resource containing accounts of significant Indian/white encounters in early Alabama history--from the Indian perspective. Written in the early 1800s by George Stiggins, the son of a Creek mother and a white father, this volume recounts the origins and ways of life of the tribes of the Creek Confederacy and their viewpoints on such key events of the Creek War as Burnt Corn and Fort Mims. Stiggins was William Weatherford's brother-in-law, and thus his explanation of Weatherford's controversial role in the Creek War has special value. William Wyman's notes and introduction put the Stiggins account in historical perspective and traces its circuitous route to publication.

Yuchi Indian Histories Before the Removal Era

Author: Jason Baird Jackson
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803245419
Release Date: 2012-11-01
Genre: Social Science

In Yuchi Indian Histories Before the Removal Era, folklorist and anthropologist Jason Baird Jackson and nine scholars of Yuchi (Euchee) Indian culture and history offer a revisionist and in-depth portrait of Yuchi community and society. This first interdisciplinary history of the Yuchi people corrects the historical record, which often submerges the Yuchi within the Creek Confederacy instead of acknowledging the Yuchi as a separate tribe. By looking at the oral, historical, ethnographic, linguistic, and archaeological record, contributors illuminate Yuchi political circumstances and cultural identity. Focusing on the pre-Removal era, the volume shows that from the entrada of Hernando de Soto into the American South in 1541 to the Yuchis’ internal migrations throughout the hinterlands of the South and their entanglement with the Creeks to the maintenance of community and identity today, the Yuchis have persisted as a distinct people. This volume provides a voice to an indigenous nation that previous generations of scholars have misidentified or erroneously assumed to be a simple constituent of the Creek Nation. In doing so, it offers a fuller picture of Yuchi social realities since the arrival of Europeans and other non-natives in their Southern homelands.

Louisiana Place Names of Indian Origin

Author: William A. Read
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817355050
Release Date: 2008-10-12
Genre: History

His writings spanned five decades and have been instrumental across a wide range of academic disciplines. Most importantly, Read devoted a good portion of his research to the meaning of place names in the southeastern United States—especially as they related to Indian word adoption by Europeans. This volume includes his three Louisiana articles combined: Louisiana: Louisiana Place-Names of Indian Origin (1927), More Indian Place-Names in Louisiana (1928), and Indian Words (1931). Joining Alabama's reprint of Indian Places Names in Alabama and Florida Place Names of Indian Origin and Seminole Personal Names, this volume completes the republication of the southern place name writings of William A. Read.

Rivers of Sand

Author: Christopher D. Haveman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803284906
Release Date: 2016-02-01
Genre: History

At its height the Creek Nation comprised a collection of multiethnic towns and villages stretching across large parts of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. By the 1830s, however, the Creeks had lost almost all this territory through treaties and by the unchecked intrusion of white settlers who illegally expropriated Native soil. With the Jackson administration unwilling to aid the Creeks in removing the squatters, the Creek people suffered from dispossession, starvation, and indebtedness. Between the 1825 Treaty of Indian Springs and the forced migrations beginning in 1836, nearly twenty-three thousand Creek Indians were relocated—voluntarily or involuntarily—to Indian Territory. Rivers of Sand fills a substantial gap in scholarship by capturing, for the first time, the full breadth and depth of the Creeks’ collective tragedy during the marches westward, on the Creek home front, and during the first years of resettlement. Unlike the Cherokee Trail of Tears, which was conducted largely at the end of a bayonet, most Creeks were removed through a combination of coercion and negotiation. Hopelessly outnumbered military personnel were forced to make concessions in order to gain the compliance of the headmen and their people. Christopher D. Haveman’s meticulous study uses previously unexamined documents to weave narratives of resistance and survival, making Rivers of Sand an essential addition to the ethnohistory of American Indian removal.

Motorcycling Alabama

Author: David Haynes
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817355289
Release Date: 2011-04-04
Genre: Sports & Recreation

A book with 128 full-color photos and more than 50 color-coded maps offers 50 motorcycle-ride loops of between 75 and 150 miles in length through every region of the state known as the Heart of Dixie. Original.

Place Names in Alabama

Author: Virginia O. Foscue
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817304102
Release Date: 1989
Genre: History

Place Names in Alabama is the first systematic attempt to account for all the names of the counties, cities, town, water courses, bodies of water, and mountains that appear on readily available maps of Alabama. In dictionary format, this volume contains some 2,610 place names, selected according to strict criteria as outlined in the introductions, from more than 52,000 available for the state of Alabama. Included in each entry is a description of the geographical feature, its exact location, the etymology of each name the feature has carried through the years, the historical circumstances and dates of each naming, and the sources for these facts, which include both written documents and interviews with local informants. “...provides fascinating insights, into not only the origin of the name but also many of the people who settled the state.” —Joab L. Thomas, President of The University of Alabama “An invaluable resource for television news and talk shows...not to mention a treasure for trivia buffs!” —Tom York, WBRC-6

Woodward s Reminiscences of the Creek Or Muscogee Indians

Author: Thomas Simpson Woodward
Publisher:
ISBN: 1295977303
Release Date: 2015-02-12
Genre:

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

Indian Place Names in Alabama

Author: William A. Read
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817302313
Release Date: 1984-10-30
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

"What is the 'meaning' of names like Coosa and Tallapoosa? Who named the Alabama and Tombigbee and Tennessee rivers? How are Cheaha and Conecuh and Talladega pronounced? How did Opelika and Tuscaloosa get their names? Questions like these, which are asked by laymen as well as by historians, geographers, and students of the English language, can be answered only by study of the origins and history of the Indian names that dot the map of Alabama.—from the Foreword Originally published by Professor Read in 1937, this volume was revised, updated, and annotated in 1984 by James B. McMillan and remains the single best compedium on the topic.

Occoneechee The Maid of the Mystic Lake

Author: Robert Frank Jarrett
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 9781465595171
Release Date: 2016-10-27
Genre:

This history has been gleaned from the works of Ethnology by James Mooney and from word of mouth, as related to the author during the past thirty years. In the beginning of historical events, we hear of man in his paradisaical home, located somewhere within the boundaries known as ancient Egypt or Chaldea. His home was far away and his former history shrouded in the darkness of countless centuries of the past, and when we contemplate the remoteness of his ancestry, we become lost in the midst of our own research. When historical light began to flash from the Orient, we find man emerging with some degree of civilization from a barbaric state into the advanced degrees of civilized and enlightened tribes. When the maritime navigator, full of visions and dreams, dared to sail for those hitherto undiscovered shores, now known as America, there lived within the realm a wandering, happy, yet untutored, race of men whom we afterwards called Indians, who dwelt in great numbers along the whole distance from Penobscot Bay south to the everglades of Florida.