Thelonious Monk

Author: Robin Kelley
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439190463
Release Date: 2010-11-02
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

A comprehensive profile of the enigmatic jazz pianist and composer offers insight into his origins, his early musical career, and the mid-twentieth-century cultural upheavals that shaped his personal and creative life.

Norman Mailer A Double Life

Author: J. Michael Lennon
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439150214
Release Date: 2014-10-28
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Drawing on extensive interviews and unpublished letters, as well as his own encounters with Mailer, this authoritative biography of the eminent novelist, journalist and controversial public figure chronicles his entire career and his self-conscious effort to create a distinctive identity for himself.

Pat and Roald

Author: Barry Farrell
Publisher:
ISBN: OCLC:30209500
Release Date: 1970
Genre: Actors


Louis Austin and the Carolina Times

Author: Jerry Gershenhorn
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469638775
Release Date: 2018-02-06
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Louis Austin (1898–1971) came of age at the nadir of the Jim Crow era and became a transformative leader of the long black freedom struggle in North Carolina. From 1927 to 1971, he published and edited the Carolina Times, the preeminent black newspaper in the state. He used the power of the press to voice the anger of black Carolinians, and to turn that anger into action in a forty-year crusade for freedom. In this biography, Jerry Gershenhorn chronicles Austin's career as a journalist and activist, highlighting his work during the Great Depression, World War II, and the postwar civil rights movement. Austin helped pioneer radical tactics during the Depression, including antisegregation lawsuits, boycotts of segregated movie theaters and white-owned stores that refused to hire black workers, and African American voting rights campaigns based on political participation in the Democratic Party. In examining Austin's life, Gershenhorn narrates the story of the long black freedom struggle in North Carolina from a new vantage point, shedding new light on the vitality of black protest and the black press in the twentieth century.

The Columbia Guide to Contemporary African American Fiction

Author: Darryl Dickson-Carr
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231124720
Release Date: 2005-12-06
Genre: Literary Criticism

In both the literal and metaphorical senses, it seemed as if 1970s America was running out of gas. The decade not only witnessed long lines at gas stations but a citizenry that had grown weary and disillusioned. High unemployment, runaway inflation, and the energy crisis, caused in part by U.S. dependence on Arab oil, characterized an increasingly bleak economic situation. As Edward D. Berkowitz demonstrates, the end of the postwar economic boom, Watergate, and defeat in Vietnam led to an unraveling of the national consensus. During the decade, ideas about the United States, how it should be governed, and how its economy should be managed changed dramatically. Berkowitz argues that the postwar faith in sweeping social programs and a global U.S. mission was replaced by a more skeptical attitude about government's ability to positively affect society. From Woody Allen to Watergate, from the decline of the steel industry to the rise of Bill Gates, and from Saturday Night Fever to the Sunday morning fervor of evangelical preachers, Berkowitz captures the history, tone, and spirit of the seventies. He explores the decade's major political events and movements, including the rise and fall of détente, congressional reform, changes in healthcare policies, and the hostage crisis in Iran. The seventies also gave birth to several social movements and the "rights revolution," in which women, gays and lesbians, and people with disabilities all successfully fought for greater legal and social recognition. At the same time, reaction to these social movements as well as the issue of abortion introduced a new facet into American political life-the rise of powerful, politically conservative religious organizations and activists. Berkowitz also considers important shifts in American popular culture, recounting the creative renaissance in American film as well as the birth of the Hollywood blockbuster. He discusses how television programs such as All in the Family and Charlie's Angels offered Americans both a reflection of and an escape from the problems gripping the country.

Have Gun Will Travel

Author: Ronin Ro
Publisher: Main Street Books
ISBN: 0385491352
Release Date: 1999
Genre: Music

Praised by many reviewers, an illustrated, unflinching expose+a7 reveals the greed, corruption, murder, and exploitation behind the unparalleled success of Death Row Records, responsible for spreading rap to the masses. Reprint.

For the Record 6 Women of Motown

Author: Dave Marsh
Publisher: Harper Perennial
ISBN: 0380793792
Release Date: 1998-06-01
Genre: Music

Three more fascinating books in a multi-volume oral history of rock and soul music, edited by one of America's preeminent pop music journalists. Told in the voices of the people who were actually there, here are the stories of: (1) Sly and the Family Stone, the Woodstock-era interracial, intergender band which merged soul with psychedelic rock; (2) George Clinton and P-Funk, the inventive musical aggregation that laid the groundwork for rap, hip-hop, alternative, and techno music; and (3) Women of Motown, members of "girl groups" and solo artists during the heyday of the world's most famous record label.

Bad Boy

Author: Ronin Ro
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743428234
Release Date: 2001-11-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The award-winning author of Have Gun Will Travel and Gangsta offers an eye-opening look at Sean "Puffy" Combs and Bad Boy Entertainment, providing a searing indictment of the man and his work and addressing such issues as the rap industry's glorification of criminal activities.

The Way of the Writer

Author: Charles Johnson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781501147227
Release Date: 2016-12-06
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

From Charles Johnson—a National Book Award winner, Professor Emeritus at University of Washington, and one of America’s preeminent scholars on literature and race—comes an instructive, inspiring guide to the craft and art of writing. An award-winning novelist, philosopher, essayist, screenwriter, professor, and cartoonist, Charles Johnson has devoted his life to creative pursuit. His 1990 National Book Award-winning novel Middle Passage is a modern classic, revered as much for its daring plot as its philosophical underpinnings. For thirty-three years, Johnson taught and mentored students in the art and craft of creative writing. The Way of the Writer is his record of those years, and the coda to a kaleidoscopic, boundary-shattering career. Organized into six accessible, easy-to-navigate sections, The Way of the Writer is both a literary reflection on the creative impulse and a utilitarian guide to the writing process. Johnson shares his lessons and exercises from the classroom, starting with word choice, sentence structure, and narrative voice, and delving into the mechanics of scene, dialogue, plot and storytelling before exploring the larger questions at stake for the serious writer. What separates literature from industrial fiction? What lies at the heart of the creative impulse? How does one navigate the literary world? And how are philosophy and fiction concomitant? Luminous, inspiring, and imminently accessible, The Way of the Writer is a revelatory glimpse into the mind of the writer and an essential guide for anyone with a story to tell.