In Our Image

Author: Stanley Karnow
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 9780307775436
Release Date: 2010-11-24
Genre: History

Traces the history of the Philippines, discusses the influence of Spain and the United States, and looks at the problems facing the Philippines today.

In Our Image

Author: Stanley Karnow
Publisher:
ISBN: 0871241242
Release Date: 1989
Genre: Philippines


Nation Building State Building and Economic Development Case Studies and Comparisons

Author: Sarah C.M. Paine
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317464099
Release Date: 2015-01-28
Genre: Business & Economics

Why do some countries remain poor and dysfunctional while others thrive and become affluent? The expert contributors to this volume seek to identify reasons why prosperity has increased rapidly in some countries but not others by constructing and comparing cases. The case studies focus on the processes of nation building, state building, and economic development in comparably situated countries over the past hundred years. Part I considers the colonial legacy of India, Algeria, the Philippines, and Manchuria. In Part II, the analysis shifts to the anticolonial development strategies of Soviet Russia, Ataturk's Turkey, Mao's China, and Nasser's Egypt. Part III is devoted to paired cases, in which ostensibly similar environments yielded very different outcomes: Haiti and the Dominican Republic; Jordan and Israel; the Republic of the Congo and neighboring Gabon; North Korea and South Korea; and, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia. All the studies examine the combined constraints and opportunities facing policy makers, their policy objectives, and the effectiveness of their strategies. The concluding chapter distills what these cases can tell us about successful development - with findings that do not validate the conventional wisdom.

Angels of the Underground

Author: Theresa Kaminski
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199928248
Release Date: 2015-11-16
Genre: Americans

When the Japanese began their brutal occupation of the Philippines in early 1942, 76,000 ill and starving Filipinos and many Americans were left to defend Bataan, Manila, and surrounding islands. During the three violent years of occupation that followed, Allied sympathizers smuggled suppliesand information to guerilla fighters and prisoner camps around the country. Theresa Kaminski's Angels of the Underground tells the story of two such members of this lesser-known resistance movement - American women known only as Miss U and High Pockets. Incredibly adept at skirting occupationauthorities to support the Allied effort, the very nature of their clandestine wartime work meant that the truth behind their dangerous activities had to be obscured as long as the Japanese occupied the Philippines. Were their identities revealed, they would be arrested, tortured, and executed.Throughout the war, Miss U and High Pockets remained hidden behind a veil of deceit and subterfuge.Angels of the Underground offers the compelling tale of two ordinary American women propelled by extraordinary circumstances into acts of heroism. Married to servicemen, Peggy Utinsky and Claire Phillips, the women behind Miss U and High Pockets, hoped that their clandestine efforts would reunitethem with their husbands. Both men died at the hands of the Japanese, but Utinsky and Phillips stayed on through the occupation, working in hospitals, moving supplies, and building their networks. Utinsky narrowly survived a month of torture at Fort Santiago, then joined John Boone's guerilla bandand became a brevet second lieutenant before returning to the Red Cross until the end of the war. Phillips barely escaped execution in 1943, and was sentenced to hard labor in a prison camp, where she remained until February 1945.Angels of the Underground illuminates the complex political dimensions of the occupied Philippines and its importance to the war effort in the Pacific. Kaminski's narrative sheds light on the Japanese-occupied city of Manila; the Bataan Death March and subsequent incarceration of American militaryprisoners in camps O'Donnell and Cabanatuan under horrific conditions; and the formation of guerrilla units in the mountains of Luzon. Angels of the Underground makes a significant contribution to the work on women's wartime experiences. Through the lens of Utinksy and Phillips, who never wavered in their belief that it was their duty as patriotic American women to aid the Allied cause, Kaminksi highlights how women have alwaysbeen active participants in war, whether or not they wear a military uniform. An impressive work of scholarship grounded in archival research and personal interviews, this is also a stunning story of courage and heroism in wartime.

Dissenting Voices in America s Rise to Power

Author: David Mayers
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139463195
Release Date: 2007-02-15
Genre: History

This book offers a major rereading of US foreign policy from Thomas Jefferson's purchase of Louisiana expanse to the Korean War. This period of one hundred and fifty years saw the expansion of the United States from fragile republic to transcontinental giant. David Mayers explores the dissenting voices which accompanied this dramatic ascent, focusing on dissenters within the political and military establishment and on the recurrent patterns of dissent that have transcended particular policies and crises. The most stubborn of these sprang from anxiety over the material and political costs of empire while other strands of dissent have been rooted in ideas of exigent justice, realpolitik, and moral duties existing beyond borders. Such dissent is evident again in the contemporary world when the US occupies the position of preeminent global power. Professor Mayers's study reminds us that America's path to power was not as straightforward as it might now seem.

The Familiar Made Strange

Author: Brooke L. Blower
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801455452
Release Date: 2015-03-05
Genre: History

In The Familiar Made Strange, twelve distinguished historians offer original and playful readings of American icons and artifacts that cut across rather than stop at the nation’s borders to model new interpretive approaches to studying United States history. These leading practitioners of the “transnational turn” pause to consider such famous icons as John Singleton Copley’s painting Watson and the Shark, Albert Eisenstaedt’s photograph V-J Day, 1945, Times Square, and Alfred Kinsey’s reports on sexual behavior, as well as more surprising but revealing artifacts like Josephine Baker’s banana skirt and William Howard Taft’s underpants. Together, they present a road map to the varying scales, angles and methods of transnational analysis that shed light on American politics, empire, gender, and the operation of power in everyday life. Contributors: Brooke L. Blower, Boston University; Mark Philip Bradley, University of Chicago; Nick Cullather, Indiana University; Brian DeLay, University of California–Berkeley; Matthew Pratt Guterl, Brown University; Jesse Hoffnung-Garskof, University of Michigan–Ann Arbor; Fredrik Logevall, Cornell University; Mary A. Renda, Mount Holyoke College; Daniel T. Rodgers, Princeton University; Andrew J. Rotter, Colgate University; Brian Rouleau, Texas A&M University; Naoko Shibusawa, Brown University

Vietnam

Author: Stanley Karnow
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9780712659659
Release Date: 1994
Genre: United States

This monumental narrative clarifies, analyses and demystifies the terrible ordeal of the Vietnam war. Free of ideological bias, profound in its understanding and compassionate in its portrayal of humanity, it is filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with the participants - French, American, Vietnamese, Chinese: diplomats, military commanders, high government officials, journalists, nurses, workers and soldiers. The Vietnam war was the most convulsive tragedy of recent times. This is its definitive history.

The Columbia Guide to Asian American History

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231505956
Release Date: 2005-03-30
Genre: History

Offering a rich and insightful road map of Asian American history as it has evolved over more than 200 years, this book marks the first systematic attempt to take stock of this field of study. It examines, comments, and questions the changing assumptions and contexts underlying the experiences and contributions of an incredibly diverse population of Americans. Arriving and settling in this nation as early as the 1790s, with American-born generations stretching back more than a century, Asian Americans have become an integral part of the American experience; this cleverly organized book marks the trajectory of that journey, offering researchers invaluable information and interpretation. Part 1 offers a synoptic narrative history, a chronology, and a set of periodizations that reflect different ways of constructing the Asian American past. Part 2 presents lucid discussions of historical debates—such as interpreting the anti-Chinese movement of the late 1800s and the underlying causes of Japanese American internment during World War II—and such emerging themes as transnationalism and women and gender issues. Part 3 contains a historiographical essay and a wide-ranging compilation of book, film, and electronic resources for further study of core themes and groups, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Hmong, Indian, Korean, Vietnamese, and others.

We Band of Angels

Author: Elizabeth Norman
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9780307799579
Release Date: 2011-06-29
Genre: History

In the fall of 1941, the Philippines was a gardenia-scented paradise for the American Army and Navy nurses stationed there. War was a distant rumor, life a routine of easy shifts and dinners under the stars. On December 8 all that changed, as Japanese bombs began raining down on American bases in Luzon, and this paradise became a fiery hell. Caught in the raging battle, the nurses set up field hospitals in the jungles of Bataan and the tunnels of Corregidor, where they tended to the most devastating injuries of war, and suffered the terrors of shells and shrapnel. But the worst was yet to come. After Bataan and Corregidor fell, the nurses were herded into internment camps where they would endure three years of fear, brutality, and starvation. Once liberated, they returned to an America that at first celebrated them, but later refused to honor their leaders with the medals they clearly deserved. Here, in letters, diaries, and riveting firsthand accounts, is the story of what really happened during those dark days, woven together in a deeply affecting saga of women in war. Praise for We Band of Angels “Gripping . . . a war story in which the main characters never kill one of the enemy, or even shoot at him, but are nevertheless heroes . . . Americans today should thank God we had such women.”—Stephen E. Ambrose “Remarkable and uplifting.”—USA Today “[Elizabeth M. Norman] brings a quiet, scholarly voice to this narrative. . . . In just a little over six months these women had turned from plucky young girls on a mild adventure to authentic heroes. . . . Every page of this history is fascinating.”—Carolyn See, The Washington Post “Riveting . . . poignant and powerful.”—The Dallas Morning News Winner of the Lavinia Dock Award for historical scholarship, the American Academy of Nursing National Media Award, and the Agnes Dillon Randolph Award

Cinema Transnationalism and Colonial India

Author: Babli Sinha
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781136765001
Release Date: 2013-07-18
Genre: History

Through the lens of cinema, this book explores the ways in which the United States, Britain and India impacted each other politically, culturally and ideologically. It argues that American films of the 1920s posited alternative notions of whiteness and the West to that of Britain, which stood for democracy and social mobility even at a time of virulent racism. The book examines the impact that the American cinema has on Indian filmmakers of the period, who were integrating its conventions with indigenous artistic traditions to articulate an Indian modernity. It considers the way American films in the 1920s presented an orientalist fantasy of Asia, which occluded the harsh realities of anti-Asian sentiment and legislation in the period as well as the exciting engagement of anti-imperial activists who sought to use the United States as the base of a transnational network. The book goes on to analyse the American ‘empire films’ of the 1930s, which adapted British narratives of empire to represent the United States as a new global paradigm. Presenting close readings of films, literature and art from the era, the book engages cinema studies with theories of post-colonialism and transnationalism, and provides a novel approach to the study of Indian cinema.

New World Strategy

Author: Harry G. Summers
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684812088
Release Date: 1995-11-09
Genre: History

Reviews American foreign policy, examining events in Bosnia, Haiti, and Rwanda, and recommends a new national role

Twelve American Wars

Author: Eugene G. Windchy
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 9781491730546
Release Date: 2014-07-23
Genre: History

Eugene G. Windchy, author of Tonkin Gulf (“Superb investigative reporting”—NY Times), lays bare the tricks, errors, and secret plans that have taken the American people into avoidable wars. Our nation's greatest catastrophe was the Civil War, in which more than 620,000 people died. The war began when Southerners fired on Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina. Windchy reports that the rebels had an opportunity to take the fort peacefully. Why did they open fire? We find out who made the final decision and why. World War I was a “war to make the world safe for democracy.” Instead, it gave birth to totalitarian Fascist and Communist regimes. World War II was a continuation of World War I, and that was followed by America's anti-Communist struggles in Korea and Vietnam. Today there are Communist countries with nuclear missiles aimed at American territory. We are still trying to cope with the effects of World War I, the greatest crime in modern history. How did the Great War begin? The history books tell us that it was sparked by an assassination. A young Serb shot an Austrian archduke, and Austria's retaliation on Serbia led to war between two great European alliances. Germany has received most of the blame for having promised to back up its Austrian ally. Twelve American Wars reveals that the archduke's assassination was a Serbian plot guided by Russian officials. The textbooks fail to mention that a month later there was another assassination. The silencing of a anti-war French politician covered up years of secret war planning by France and Russia. How did the United States get involved? One factor was the outrage provoked by the sinking of the huge passenger liner Lusitania, a British ship with Americans on board.Twelve American Wars presents overwhelming evidence that the British Admiralty, headed by Winston Churchill, deliberately put the Lusitania at risk, hoping to bring the United States into the war. Contrary to what we hear from Mexicans, the United States did not steal California from Mexico in the Mexican War of 1846 to 1848. Native Californians, called “Californios,” had expelled their last Mexican governor in 1845. Eugene Windchy's book is full of surprising facts. He believes that policy makers hoping to prevent war need to know the truth about our past wars, not just the politically acceptable stories in the textbooks.

The Coldest Winter

Author: David Halberstam
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 9780330540162
Release Date: 2011-01-14
Genre: History

Up until now, the Korean War has been the black hole of modern American history. The Coldest Winter changes that, giving readers a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. He charts the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu, and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides astonishingly vivid and nuanced portraits of all the major figures -- Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway. At the heart of the book are the individual stories of the soldiers on the front lines who were left to deal with the consequences of the dangerous misjudgments and competing agendas of powerful men. We meet them, follow them, and see some of the most dreadful battles in history through their eyes. As ever, Halberstam was concerned with the extraordinary courage and resolve of people asked to bear an extraordinary burden. Contemporary history in its most literary and luminescent form, The Coldest Winter provides crucial perspective on the Vietnam War and the events of today.