In the Name of Identity

Author: Amin Maalouf
Publisher: Arcade Publishing
ISBN: 1559705930
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Philosophy

Argues that people do not generally identify with one single nationality and culture but straddle two or more cultures.

Stories of Identity

Author: Facing History and Ourselves
Publisher: Facing History and Ourselves
ISBN: 9780979844034
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Children of immigrants

This resource book reflects the way that migration affects personal identity and offers educators and students the resources to examine this migration through methods of storytelling. It reveals experiences of immigrants from the individual to the collective through memoirs, journalistic accounts, and interviews. These experiences reflect a recent and global phenomenon where identity and citizenship are challenged by the greater blurring of national boundaries. By exploring the stories of young migrants and their changing communities, "Stories" takes into consideration the fluidity of identity. A glossary is included. Individual sections contain footnotes.

Fragile Spaces

Author: Steven E. Aschheim
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 9783110596939
Release Date: 2018-09-24
Genre: Social Science

This book consists of a range of essays covering the complex crises, tensions and dilemmas but also the positive potential in the meeting of Jews with Western culture. In numerous contexts and through the work of fascinating individuals and thinkers, the work examines some of the consequences of political, cultural and personal rupture, as well as the manifold ways in which various Jewish intellectuals, politicians (and occasionally spies!) sought to respond to these ruptures and carve out new, sometimes profound, sometimes fanciful, options of thought and action. It also delves critically into the attacks on liberal and Enlightenment humanism. In almost all the essays the fragility of things is palpably present and the book touches on some of the ironies, problematics and functions of responses to that condition. The work mirrors the author's ongoing fascination with the always fraught, fragile and creatively fecund confrontation of Jews (and others) with European modernity, its history, politics, culture and self-definition. In a time of increasing anxiety and feelings of fragility, this work may be helpful in understanding how people at an earlier (and sometimes contemporary) period sought to come to terms with a similar predicament.

Beyond Postmodernism

Author: Klaus Stierstorfer
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 9783110906813
Release Date: 2003-01-01
Genre: Literary Criticism

After the veritable hype concerning postmodernism in the 1980s and early 1990s, when questions about when it began, what it means and which texts it comprises were apt to trigger heated discussions, the excitement has notably cooled down at the turn of the century. Voices are now beginning to be heard which seem to suggest a new episteme in the making which points beyond postmodernism, while it remains at the same time very uncertain whether what appears as newness is not rather a return to traditional concepts, theoretical premises, and authorial practices. Contributors to this volume propose to explore new openings and recent developments in anglophone literatures and cultural theories which engage with issues seen to be central in the construction of a postmodern paradigm, but deal with them in ways that promise new openings or a new Zeitgeist.

Soul Self and Society

Author: Edward L. Rubin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199348671
Release Date: 2015-02-17
Genre: Political Science

Political and social commentators regularly bemoan the decline of morality in the modern world. They claim that the norms and values that held society together in the past are rapidly eroding, to be replaced by permissiveness and empty hedonism. But as Edward Rubin demonstrates in this powerful account of moral transformations, these prophets of doom are missing the point. Morality is not diminishing; instead, a new morality, centered on an ethos of human self-fulfillment, is arising to replace the old one. As Rubin explains, changes in morality have gone hand in hand with changes in the prevailing mode of governance throughout the course of Western history. During the Early Middle Ages, a moral system based on honor gradually developed. In a dangerous world where state power was declining, people relied on bonds of personal loyalty that were secured by generosity to their followers and violence against their enemies. That moral order, exemplified in the early feudal system and in sagas like The Song of Roland, The Song of the Cid, and the Arthurian legends has faded, but its remnants exist today in criminal organizations like the Mafia and in the rap music of the urban ghettos. When state power began to revive in the High Middle Ages through the efforts of the European monarchies, and Christianity became more institutionally effective and more spiritually intense, a new morality emerged. Described by Rubin as the morality of higher purposes, it demanded that people devote their personal efforts to achieving salvation and their social efforts to serving the emerging nation-states. It insisted on social hierarchy, confined women to subordinate roles, restricted sex to procreation, centered child-rearing on moral inculcation, and countenanced slavery and the marriage of pre-teenage girls to older men. Our modern era, which began in the late 18th century, has seen the gradual erosion of this morality of higher purposes and the rise of a new morality of self-fulfillment, one that encourages individuals to pursue the most meaningful and rewarding life-path. Far from being permissive or a moral abdication, it demands that people respect each other's choices, that sex be mutually enjoyable, that public positions be allocated according to merit, and that society provide all its members with their minimum needs so that they have the opportunity to fulfill themselves. Where people once served the state, the state now functions to serve the people. The clash between this ascending morality and the declining morality of higher purposes is the primary driver of contemporary political and cultural conflict. A sweeping, big-idea book in the vein of Francis Fukuyama's The End of History, Charles Taylor's The Secular Age, and Richard Sennett's The Fall of Public Man, Edward Rubin's new volume promises to reshape our understanding of morality, its relationship to government, and its role in shaping the emerging world of High Modernity.

Law Power and Justice in Ancient Israel

Author: Douglas A. Knight
Publisher: Westminster John Knox Press
ISBN: 9780664221447
Release Date: 2011
Genre: Religion

Using socio-anthropological theory and archaeological evidence, Knight argues that while the laws in the Hebrew Bible tend to reflect the interests of those in power, the majority of ancient Israelites--located in villages--developed their own unwritten customary laws to regulate behavior and resolve legal conflicts in their own communities. This book includes numerous examples from village, city, and cult. --from publisher description

Breaking the Spell

Author: Daniel C. Dennett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 110121886X
Release Date: 2006-02-02
Genre: Religion

For all the thousands of books that have been written about religion, few until this one have attempted to examine it scientifically: to ask why—and how—it has shaped so many lives so strongly. Is religion a product of blind evolutionary instinct or rational choice? Is it truly the best way to live a moral life? Ranging through biology, history, and psychology, Daniel C. Dennett charts religion’s evolution from “wild” folk belief to “domesticated” dogma. Not an antireligious screed but an unblinking look beneath the veil of orthodoxy, Breaking the Spell will be read and debated by believers and skeptics alike.

Essays from the Margins

Author: Luis N. Rivera-Pagán
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 9781630876753
Release Date: 2014-11-18
Genre: Religion

These essays emerge from different crucial and complex conflicts: from the memory of a bishop, Bartolome de las Casas, urging the pope of his time to cleanse the church of complicity with violence, oppression, and slavery; from the lament and defiance of so many Middle Eastern women, victims of male domination and too many wars; from the voices bursting out from the colonial margins that dare to question and transgress the norms and laws imposed by colonizers and conquerors; from the emerging and diverse theological disruptions of traditional orthodoxies and rigid dogmatisms; from the denial of human rights to immigrant communities, living in the shadows of opulent societies; from the use of the sacred Hebrew Scriptures to displace and dispossess the indigenous peoples of Palestine. The essays belong to different intellectual genres and conceptual crossroads and are thus illustrative of the dialogic imagination that the Russian intellectual Mikhail Bakhtin considered basic to any serious intellectual enterprise. They are also the literary sediment of years of sharing lectures, dialogues, and debates in several academic institutions in the United States, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Malaysia, Switzerland, Germany, and Palestine.

Black Hawk

Author: Kerry A. Trask
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 9781466860926
Release Date: 2013-12-24
Genre: History

A stirring retelling of the Black Hawk War that brings into dramatic focus the forces struggling for control over the American frontier Until 1822, when John Jacob Aster swallowed up the fur trade and the trading posts of the upper Mississippi were closed, the 6,000-strong Sauk Nation occupied one of North America's largest and most prosperous Indian settlements. Its spacious longhouse lodges and council-house squares, supported by hundreds of acres of planted fields, were the envy of white Americans who had already begun to encroach upon the rich Indian land that served as the center of the Sauk's spiritual world. When the inevitable conflicts between natives and white squatters turned violent, Black Hawk's Sauks were forced into exile, banished forever from the east side of the Mississippi River. Longing for what their culture had been, Black Hawk and his followers, including 700 warriors, rose up in a rage in the spring of 1832, and defiantly crossed the Mississippi from Iowa to Illinois in order to reclaim their ancestral home. Though the war lasted only three months, no other violent encounter between white America and native peoples embodies so clearly the essence of the Republic's inner conflict between its belief in freedom and human rights and its insatiable appetite for new territory. Kerry A. Trask gives new and vivid life to the heroic efforts of Black Hawk and his men, illuminating the tragic history of frontier America through the eyes of those who were cast aside in the pursuit of the new nation's manifest destiny.

Our Faith in Evil

Author: Gregory E. Desilet
Publisher: McFarland & Company Incorporated Pub
ISBN: 078642348X
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Performing Arts

"The text examines violence in film, analyzing psychological and social effects, the dramatic structure of melodrama and its context in reality"--Provided by publisher.

Racisms in the new world order

Author: Narayan Gopalkrishnan
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105123321445
Release Date: 2007-07-01
Genre: Law

Racism is a significant social problem that diminishes the social fabric of society, creates social tension and impacts on the life chances of the people involved. It impacts upon those who perpetuate it, on those who are at the 'receiving end', as well as on those who are not directly involved in the problem. Within the complexities of a globalized world, with its networks of actors and processes, racism is constantly changing its form and impacts. This book examines the contemporary forms of racisms evolving within this context, moving beyond the traditional idea of a single monolithic racism based on biology or culture.It offers new perspectives on theorising the new racisms and looks at the intersections with different forms of prejudice and discrimination such as sexism and ageism. The book places the discussion of racism within the contemporary discussions of the 'War on Terror' and the allied issues of 'Islamaphobia' and the 'New Antisemitism', excavating the many elements involved including the media and the State, using case studies from across the world to highlight these. The final section focuses on the challenges in developing a discourse on anti-racism as well as presents strategies towards a platform for action.

Human Insecurity in a Global World

Author: Lincoln C. Chen
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674014545
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Political Science

The decade of the 1990s witnessed enormous changes in the international environment. The Cold War conclusively ended. Biotechnology and communications technology made rapid advances. Barriers to international trade and investment declined. Taken together, these developments created many opportunities for peace and prosperity. At the same time, with the end of superpower domination, ethnically based intranational conflicts brought on widespread suffering. And while globalization expanded opportunity, growth, and incomes, it increased inequality of incomes and decreased human security. Moreover, as countries have become more closely linked, insecurity in one country has affected security in other countries.