Across the Divide

Author: Steven J. Ramold
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814729199
Release Date: 2013-04-22
Genre: History

"Ramold disputes the old argument that citizen-soldiers in the Union Army differed little from civilians. He shows how a chasm of mutual distrust grew between soldiers and civilians during four years of fighting that led many Democratic soldiers to…build the groundwork for the postwar Republican Party. Filled with gripping anecdotes, this book makes for fascinating reading." —Scott Reynolds Nelson, College of William & Mary Union soldiers left home in 1861 with expectations that the conflict would be short, the purpose of the war was clear, and public support back home was universal. As the war continued, however, Union soldiers noticed growing disparities between their own expectations and those of their families at home with growing concern and alarm. Instead of support for the war, an extensive and oft-violent anti-war movement emerged. In this first study of the gulf between Union soldiers and northern civilians, Steven J. Ramold reveals the wide array of factors that prevented the Union Army and the civilians on whose behalf they were fighting from becoming a united front during the Civil War. In Across the Divide, Ramold illustrates how the divided spheres of Civil War experience created social and political conflict far removed from the better-known battlefields of the war. Steven J. Ramold, Associate Professor of American History at Eastern Michigan University, is the author of two previous books, Slaves, Sailors, Citizens: African Americans in the Union Navy and Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army. He and his wife reside in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469615974
Release Date: 2014-03-01
Genre: History

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 1 March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Nicholas Marshall The Great Exaggeration: Death and the Civil War Sarah Bischoff Paulus America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58 Ted Maris-Wolf "Of Blood and Treasure": Recaptive Africans and the Politics of Slave Trade Suppression Review Essay W. Caleb McDaniel The Bonds and Boundaries of Antislavery Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Craig A. Warren Lincoln's Body: The President in Popular Films of the Sesquicentennial Notes on Contributors

Illinois in the War of 1812

Author: Gillum Ferguson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252094552
Release Date: 2012-01-26
Genre: History

Russell P. Strange "Book of the Year" Award from the Illinois State Historical Society, 2012. On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. Split off from Indiana Territory in 1809, the new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and a part of Michigan. The extreme southern part of the region was rich in timber, but the dominant feature of the landscape was the vast tall grass prairie that stretched without major interruption from Lake Michigan for more than three hundred miles to the south. The territory was largely inhabited by Indians: Sauk, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, and others. By 1812, however, pioneer farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, a populous Illinois was confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, in which white settlers faced both Indians resistant to their encroachments and British forces poised to seize control of the upper Mississippi and Great Lakes. The war ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Sometimes led by skillful tacticians, at other times by blundering looters who got lost in the tall grass, the combatants showed each other little mercy. Until and even after the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, there were massacres by both sides, laying the groundwork for later betrayal of friendly and hostile tribes alike and for ultimate expulsion of the Indians from the new state of Illinois. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with so much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences. Endorsed by the Illinois Society of the War of 1812 and the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission.

American Educational History Journal

Author: Paul J. Ramsey
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 9781623964238
Release Date: 2013-08-01
Genre: Education

The American Educational History Journal is a peer?reviewed, national research journal devoted to the examination of educational topics using perspectives from a variety of disciplines. The editors of AEHJ encourage communication between scholars from numerous disciplines, nationalities, institutions, and backgrounds. Authors come from a variety of disciplines including political science, curriculum, history, philosophy, teacher education, and educational leadership. Acceptance for publication in AEHJ requires that each author present a well?articulated argument that deals substantively with questions of educational history.

Sundown Towns

Author: James W. Loewen
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 9781595586742
Release Date: 2005-09-29
Genre: History

“Don’t let the sun go down on you in this town.” We equate these words with the Jim Crow South but, in a sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, award-winning and bestselling author James W. Loewen demonstrates that strict racial exclusion was the norm in American towns and villages from sea to shining sea for much of the twentieth century. Weaving history, personal narrative, and hard-nosed analysis, Loewen shows that the sundown town was—and is—an American institution with a powerful and disturbing history of its own, told here for the first time. In Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, sundown towns were created in waves of violence in the early decades of the twentieth century, and then maintained well into the contemporary era. Sundown Towns redraws the map of race relations, extending the lines of racial oppression through the backyard of millions of Americans—and lobbing an intellectual hand grenade into the debates over race and racism today.

Nursing History Review Volume 4

Author: Joan E. Lynaugh
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812214536
Release Date: 1995-09-01
Genre: Medical

The official journal of the American Association for the History of Nursing

A Guide to the History of Illinois

Author: John Hoffmann
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313241104
Release Date: 1991-01-01
Genre: History

A guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. The second part includes 12 reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. "Reference & Research Book News" John Hoffmann's volume is the first comprehensive guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes full and careful descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. Eight chapters are devoted to specific areas, from 1673 to the present, while six chapters are thematic in nature, covering, for instance, the religious and educational history of the state, the voluminous literature on Chicago, and the subject of Abraham Lincoln in Illinois. These essays are preceded by introductory remarks on historical surveys, reference books, and periodicals in the field, studies of such topics as the medical and legal history of the state, and publications relating to maps and newspapers of Illinois. This long overdue guide will bring together the vast accumulation of primary and secondary materials that defines Illinois history. The nature and scope of this guide is unmatched by any previous work. The second part includes twelve reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. This section provides detailed information on specific collections within the context of related sources on particular periods and topics. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. As part of the series Reference Guides to State History and Research, this book provides a valuable resource for researchers, students, genealogists, and the interested public, and is an appropriate selection for reference collections in American, regional, or Illinois history.