A Guide to the History of Illinois

Author: John Hoffmann
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 0313241104
Release Date: 1991-01-01
Genre: History

A guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. The second part includes 12 reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. "Reference & Research Book News" John Hoffmann's volume is the first comprehensive guide to the literature and sources of Illinois history. It includes full and careful descriptions of both primary and secondary sources. The first part of the book consists of bibliographical essays that focus on particular periods and topics in Illinois history. Eight chapters are devoted to specific areas, from 1673 to the present, while six chapters are thematic in nature, covering, for instance, the religious and educational history of the state, the voluminous literature on Chicago, and the subject of Abraham Lincoln in Illinois. These essays are preceded by introductory remarks on historical surveys, reference books, and periodicals in the field, studies of such topics as the medical and legal history of the state, and publications relating to maps and newspapers of Illinois. This long overdue guide will bring together the vast accumulation of primary and secondary materials that defines Illinois history. The nature and scope of this guide is unmatched by any previous work. The second part includes twelve reports on the principal archival and manuscript repositories for documentation in the field of Illinois history. This section provides detailed information on specific collections within the context of related sources on particular periods and topics. A final chapter surveys Illinois-related collections in the Library of Congress and the National Archives. As part of the series Reference Guides to State History and Research, this book provides a valuable resource for researchers, students, genealogists, and the interested public, and is an appropriate selection for reference collections in American, regional, or Illinois history.

Manhood Citizenship and the National Guard

Author: Eleanor L. Hannah
Publisher: Ohio State University Press
ISBN: 9780814210451
Release Date: 2007
Genre: History

"During the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, thousands upon thousands of American men devoted their time and money to the creation of an unsought - and in some quarters unwelcome - revived state militia. In this book, Eleanor L. Hannah studies the social history of the National Guard, focusing on issues of manhood and citizenship as they relate to the rise of the state militias." "The implications of this book are far-reaching, for it offers historians a fresh look at a long-ignored group of men and unites social and cultural history to explore changing notions of manhood and citizenship during years of frenetic change in the American landscape."--BOOK JACKET.

African Americans and the Color Line in Ohio 1915 1930

Author: William Wayne Giffin
Publisher: Ohio State University Press
ISBN: 9780814210031
Release Date: 2005
Genre: History

Writing in true social history tradition, William W. Giffin presents a magisterial study of African Americans focusing on times that saw the culmination of trends that were fundamentally important in shaping the twentieth century. While many scholars have examined African Americans in the south and such large cities as New York and Chicago during this time, other important urban areas have been ignored. Ohio, with its large but very different urban centers-notably, Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati-provides Giffin with the wealth of statistical data and qualitative material that he uses to argue that the "color line" in Ohio hardened during this time period as the Great Migration gained force. His data shows, too, that the color line varied according to urban area-it hardened progressively as one traveled South in the state. In addition, whereas previous studies have concentrated on activism at the national level through such groups as the NAACP, Giffin shows how African American men and women in Ohio constantly negotiated the color line on a local level, through both resistance and accommodation on a daily and very interpersonal level with whites, other blacks, and people of different ethnic, class, and racial backgrounds. This early grassroots resistance provided the groundwork for the Civil Rights movement that would gain momentum some twenty years later.

Forgotten Reformer

Author: Frank Morn
Publisher: University Press of America
ISBN: 9780761853008
Release Date: 2010-12-01
Genre: Law

This book traces criminal justice practice and reform developments in late nineteenth-century America through Robert McClaughry's career as a prison warden, a chief of police of Chicago, a reformatory superintendent, and one of the first federal prison wardens. McClaughry developed and led a reform movement that resonates today.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469615974
Release Date: 2014-03-01
Genre: History

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 1 March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Nicholas Marshall The Great Exaggeration: Death and the Civil War Sarah Bischoff Paulus America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58 Ted Maris-Wolf "Of Blood and Treasure": Recaptive Africans and the Politics of Slave Trade Suppression Review Essay W. Caleb McDaniel The Bonds and Boundaries of Antislavery Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Craig A. Warren Lincoln's Body: The President in Popular Films of the Sesquicentennial Notes on Contributors

Illinois in the War of 1812

Author: Gillum Ferguson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252094552
Release Date: 2012-01-26
Genre: History

Russell P. Strange "Book of the Year" Award from the Illinois State Historical Society, 2012. On the eve of the War of 1812, the Illinois Territory was a new land of bright promise. Split off from Indiana Territory in 1809, the new territory ran from the junction of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers north to the U.S. border with Canada, embracing the current states of Illinois, Wisconsin, and a part of Michigan. The extreme southern part of the region was rich in timber, but the dominant feature of the landscape was the vast tall grass prairie that stretched without major interruption from Lake Michigan for more than three hundred miles to the south. The territory was largely inhabited by Indians: Sauk, Potawatomi, Kickapoo, and others. By 1812, however, pioneer farmers had gathered in the wooded fringes around prime agricultural land, looking out over the prairies with longing and trepidation. Six years later, a populous Illinois was confident enough to seek and receive admission as a state in the Union. What had intervened was the War of 1812, in which white settlers faced both Indians resistant to their encroachments and British forces poised to seize control of the upper Mississippi and Great Lakes. The war ultimately broke the power and morale of the Indian tribes and deprived them of the support of their ally, Great Britain. Sometimes led by skillful tacticians, at other times by blundering looters who got lost in the tall grass, the combatants showed each other little mercy. Until and even after the war was concluded by the Treaty of Ghent in 1814, there were massacres by both sides, laying the groundwork for later betrayal of friendly and hostile tribes alike and for ultimate expulsion of the Indians from the new state of Illinois. In this engrossing new history, published upon the war's bicentennial, Gillum Ferguson underlines the crucial importance of the War of 1812 in the development of Illinois as a state. The history of Illinois in the War of 1812 has never before been told with so much attention to the personalities who fought it, the events that defined it, and its lasting consequences. Endorsed by the Illinois Society of the War of 1812 and the Illinois War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission.

A History of Illinois

Author: Thomas Ford
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252021401
Release Date: 1854
Genre: History

A history of the state's first thirty years by Illinois' seventh governor includes coverage of the ouster of Mormons from the state, the Black Hawk War, and the murder of Elijah Lovejoy.

Stephen A Douglas

Author: Robert Walter Johannsen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252066359
Release Date: 1973
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

For the quarter-century before 1860, Stephen A. Douglas was the dominant figure on the American political scene, far outshadowing Abraham Lincoln. This first paperback edition of Robert Johannsen's authoritative biography includes a new preface.

Divided Loyalties

Author: Craig Phelan
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791420884
Release Date: 1994-09-08
Genre: Business & Economics

John Mitchell was a contradictory figure, representing the best and worst labor leadership had to offer at the turn of the century. Articulate, intelligent, and a skillful negotiator, Mitchell made effective use of the press and political opportunities as well as the muscle of his union. He was also manipulative, calculating, tremendously ambitious, and prone to place more trust in the business community than in his own rank and file. Phelan relates Mitchell’s life to many issues currently being debated by labor historians, such as organized labor’s search for respectability, its development of a large bureaucracy, its ambiguous relationship to the state, and its suppression of worker input. In addition, he shows how Mitchell’s life illuminates broad economic and political developments in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Sundown Towns

Author: James W. Loewen
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 9781595586742
Release Date: 2005-09-29
Genre: History

“Don’t let the sun go down on you in this town.” We equate these words with the Jim Crow South but, in a sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, award-winning and bestselling author James W. Loewen demonstrates that strict racial exclusion was the norm in American towns and villages from sea to shining sea for much of the twentieth century. Weaving history, personal narrative, and hard-nosed analysis, Loewen shows that the sundown town was—and is—an American institution with a powerful and disturbing history of its own, told here for the first time. In Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, sundown towns were created in waves of violence in the early decades of the twentieth century, and then maintained well into the contemporary era. Sundown Towns redraws the map of race relations, extending the lines of racial oppression through the backyard of millions of Americans—and lobbing an intellectual hand grenade into the debates over race and racism today.

Baseball

Author: Harold Seymour
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195069075
Release Date: 1991
Genre: Sports & Recreation

In Baseball: The People's Game, Dorothy Seymour Mills and Harold Seymour produce an authoritative, multi-volume chronicle of America's national pastime. The first two volumes of this study -The Early Years and The Golden Age -won universal acclaim. The New York Times wrote that they "will grip every American who has invested part of his youth and dreams in the sport," while The Boston Globe called them "irresistible." Now, in The People's Game, the authors offer the first book devoted entirely to the history of the game outside of the professional leagues, revealing how, from its early beginnings up to World War II, baseball truly became the great American pastime. They explore the bond between baseball and boys through the decades, the game's place in institutions from colleges to prisons to the armed forces, the rise of women's baseball that coincided with nineteenth century feminism, and the struggles of black players and clubs from the later years of slavery up to the Second World War. Whether discussing the birth of softball or the origins of the seventh inning stretch, the Seymours enrich their extensive research with fascinating details and entertaining anecdotes as well as a wealth of baseball experience. The People's Game brings to life the central role of baseball for generations of Americans. Note: On August 2, 2010, Oxford University Press made public that it would credit Dorothy Seymour Mills as co-author of the three baseball histories previously "authored" solely by her late husband, Harold Seymour. The Seymours collaborated on Baseball: The Early Years (1960), Baseball: The Golden Age (1971) and Baseball: The People's Game (1991).

Journal

Author: Illinois State Archaeological Society
Publisher:
ISBN: STANFORD:36105003749954
Release Date: 1943
Genre: Archaeology