Late Victorian Holocausts El Nino Famines and the Making of the Third World

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 9781859843826
Release Date: 2002-06-17
Genre: History

Shows how the droughts affecting northern Africa, China, and India in the 1870s and 1890s are consistant with El Niäno effects, and discusses the economic, racial, and political forces that allowed fifty million people to starve.

Late Victorian Holocausts

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 1859847390
Release Date: 2001-01-01
Genre: History

Shows how the droughts affecting northern Africa, China, and India in the 1870s and 1890s are consistant with El Nino effects, and discusses the economic, racial, and political forces that allowed 50 million people to starve.

Late Victorian Holocausts

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 9781781680612
Release Date: 2002-06-17
Genre: History

Bestselling, magisterial melding of global environmental history and global political history. Winner of the World History Association Book Award. Examining a series of El Niño-induced droughts and the famines that they spawned around the globe in the last third of the 19th century, Mike Davis discloses the intimate, baleful relationship between imperial arrogance and natural incident that combined to produce some of the worst tragedies in human history. Late Victorian Holocausts focuses on three zones of drought and subsequent famine: India, Northern China; and Northeastern Brazil. All were affected by the same global climatic factors that caused massive crop failures, and all experienced brutal famines that decimated local populations. But the effects of drought were magnified in each case because of singularly destructive policies promulgated by different ruling elites. Davis argues that the seeds of underdevelopment in what later became known as the Third World were sown in this era of High Imperialism, as the price for capitalist modernization was paid in the currency of millions of peasants’ lives.

Planet of Slums

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781844671601
Release Date: 2007-09-17
Genre: Political Science

Celebrated urban theorist Davis provides a global overview of the diverse religious, ethnic, and political movements competing for the souls of the new urban poor.

Mosquito Empires

Author: J. R. McNeill
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139484503
Release Date: 2010-01-11
Genre: History

This book explores the links among ecology, disease, and international politics in the context of the Greater Caribbean - the landscapes lying between Surinam and the Chesapeake - in the seventeenth through early twentieth centuries. Ecological changes made these landscapes especially suitable for the vector mosquitoes of yellow fever and malaria, and these diseases wrought systematic havoc among armies and would-be settlers. Because yellow fever confers immunity on survivors of the disease, and because malaria confers resistance, these diseases played partisan roles in the struggles for empire and revolution, attacking some populations more severely than others. In particular, yellow fever and malaria attacked newcomers to the region, which helped keep the Spanish Empire Spanish in the face of predatory rivals in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In the late eighteenth and through the nineteenth century, these diseases helped revolutions to succeed by decimating forces sent out from Europe to prevent them.

Ecology of Fear

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781466862845
Release Date: 2014-01-14
Genre: Science

Los Angeles has become a magnet for the American apocalyptic imagination. Riot, fire, flood, earthquake...only locusts are missing from the almost biblical list of disasters that have struck the city in the 1990s. From Ventura to Laguna, more than one million Southern Californians have been directly touched by disaster-related death, injury, or damage to their homes and businesses. Middle-class apprehensions about angry underclasses are exceeded only by anxieties about blind thrust faults underlying downtown L.A. or about the firestorms that periodically incinerate Malibu. And the force of real catastrophe has been redoubled by the obsessive fictional destruction of Los Angeles--by aliens, comets, and twisters--in scores of novels and films. The former "Land of Sunshine" is now seen by much of the world, including many of L.A.'s increasingly nervous residents, as a veritable Book of the Apocalypse theme park. In this extraordinary book, Mike Davis, the author of City of Quartz and our most fascinating interpreter of the American metropolis, unravels the secret political history of disaster, real and imaginary, in Southern California. As he surveys the earthquakes of Santa Monica, the burning of Koreatown, the invasion of "man-eating" mountain lions, the movie Volcano, and even Los Angeles's underrated tornado problem, he exposes the deep complicity between social injustice and perceptions of natural disorder. Arguing that paranoia about nature obscures the fact that Los Angeles has deliberately put itself in harm's way, Davis reveals how market-driven urbanization has for generations transgressed against environmental common sense. And he shows that the floods, fires, and earthquakes reaped by the city were tragedies as avoidable--and unnatural--as the beating of Rodney King and the ensuing explosion in the streets. Rich with detail, bold and original, Ecology of Fear is a gripping reconnaissance into the urban future, an essential portrait of America at the millennium.

Old Gods New Enigmas

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 9781788732192
Release Date: 2018-06-26
Genre: Political Science

According to the United Nations, more than one billion people now live in the slums of the cities of the South. In this brilliant and ambitious book, Mike Davis explores the future of a radically unequal and explosively unstable urban world. From the sprawling barricadas of Lima to the garbage hills of Manila, urbanization has been disconnected from industrialization, even economic growth. Davis portrays a vast humanity warehoused in shantytowns and exiled from the formal world economy. He argues that the rise of this informal urban proletariat is a wholly original development unforeseen by either classical Marxism or neoliberal theory. Are the great slums, as a terrified Victorian middle class once imagined, volcanoes waiting to erupt? Davis provides the first global overview of the diverse religious, ethnic, and political movements competing for the souls of the new urban poor. He surveys Hindu fundamentalism in Bombay, the Islamist resistance in Casablanca and Cairo, street gangs in Cape Town and San Salvador, Pentecostalism in Kinshasa and Rio de Janeiro, and revolutionary populism in Caracas and La Paz.Planet of Slums ends with a provocative meditation on the “war on terrorism” as an incipient world war between the American empire and the new slum poor.

Nature s Government

Author: Richard Harry Drayton
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300059760
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Gardening

This daring attempt to juxtapose the histories of Britain, western science, and imperialism shows how colonial expansion, from the age of Alexander the Great to the 20th century, led to complex kinds of knowledge.

Famine

Author: Cormac Ó Gráda
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691122377
Release Date: 2009
Genre: History

History.

Magical Urbanism

Author: Mike Davis
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 185984328X
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Social Science

Winner of the 2001 Carey McWilliams Award Is the capital of Latin America a small island at the mouth of the Hudson River? Will California soon hold the balance of power in Mexican national politics? Will Latinos reinvigorate the US labor movement? These are some of the provocative questions that Mike Davis explores in this fascinating account of the Latinization of the US urban landscape. As he forefully shows, this is a demographic and cultural revolution with extraordinary implications. With Spanish surnames increasing five times faster than the general population, salsa is becoming the predominant ethnic rhythm (and flavor) of contemporary city life. In Los Angeles, Houston, San Antonio, and (shortly) Dallas, Latinos outnumber non-Hispanic whites; in New York, San Diego and Phoenix they outnumber Blacks. According to the Bureau of the Census, Latinos will supply fully two-thirds of the nation's population growth between now and the middle of the 21st century when nearly 100 millions Americans will boast Latin American ancestry. Davis focuses on the great drama of how Latinos are attempting to translate their urban demographic ascendancy into effective social power. Pundits are now unanimous that Spanish-surname voters are the sleeping giant of US politics. Yet electoral mobilization alone is unlikely to redress the increasing income and opportunity gaps between urban Latinos and suburban non-Hispanic whites. Thus in Los Angeles and elsewhere, the militant struggles of Latino workers and students are reinventing the American left. Fully updated throughout, and with new chapters on the urban Southwest and the explodiing counter-migration of Anglos to Mexico, Magical Urbanism is essential reading for anyone who wants to grasp the future of urban America This paperback edition of Mike Davis's investigation into the Latinization of America incorporates the extraordinary findings of the 2000 Census as well as new chapters on the militarization of the border and violence against immigrants.

No One Is Illegal

Author: Justin Akers Chac—n
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 9781608460526
Release Date: 2017-01-15
Genre: Political Science

No One Is Illegal debunks the leading ideas behind the often-violent right-wing backlash against immigrants.

Politics and Empire in Victorian Britain

Author: Antoinette Burton
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0312293356
Release Date: 2001-10-19
Genre: History

Politics and Empire in Victorian Britain: A Reader is the first source book to track the role the British Empire played in domestic politics, social attitudes and intellectual and cultural life. Unlike most other books on this subject, the reader also highlights women’s contributions to both domestic and imperial questions, and takes account of colonial men’s and women’s activities as well. The reader introduces the intersections of “home” and “empire” so that the effects of imperialism on Victorian politics and society can be fully appreciated.

Space in the Tropics

Author: Peter Redfield
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520923421
Release Date: 2000-12-19
Genre: Social Science

Rockets roar into space—bearing roughly half the world's commercial satellites—from the same South American coastal rainforest where convicts once did time on infamous Devil's Island. What makes Space in the Tropics enthralling is anthropologist Peter Redfield's ability to draw from these two disparate European projects in French Guiana a gleaming web of ideas about the intersections of nature and culture. In comparing the Franco-European Ariane rocket program with the earlier penal experiment, Redfield connects the myth of Robinson Crusoe, nineteenth-century prison reform, the Dreyfus Affair, tropical medicine, postwar exploration of outer space, satellite technology, development, and ecotourism with a focus on place, and the incorporation of this particular place into greater extended systems. Examining the wider context of the Ariane program, he argues that technology and nature must be understood within a greater ecology of displacement and makes a case for the importance of margins in understanding the trajectories of modern life.