Laughter Out of Place

Author: Donna Goldstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520955417
Release Date: 2013-09-20
Genre: Social Science

Donna M. Goldstein presents a hard-hitting critique of urban poverty and violence and challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty" in this compelling read. Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas, or urban shantytowns in Rio de Janeiro, who cope with unbearable suffering, violence and social abandonment. The book offers a clear-eyed view of socially conditioned misery while focusing on the creative responses—absurdist and black humor—that people generate amid daily conditions of humiliation, anger, and despair. Goldstein helps us to understand that such joking and laughter is part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation among residents of the shantytown.

Laughter Out of Place

Author: Donna M. Goldstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520276048
Release Date: 2013-09-29
Genre: Social Science

Drawing on the author's experience in Brazil, this text provides a portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas - a portrait that challenges much of what we think we know about the 'culture of poverty'. It helps us understand the nature of joking and laughter in the shantytown.

Laughter Out of Place

Author: Donna M. Goldstein
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520235977
Release Date: 2003-11-27
Genre: Social Science

Annotation Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Donna M. Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas--a portrait that challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty." Confronted with these women's absurdist and black-humored storytelling practices in the face of trauma and tragedy, Goldstein helps us to understand such joking and laughter--so disruptive of "universal" notions of normality and ethics--as part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation of the shantytown.

Classic Readings in Cultural Anthropology

Author: Gary Ferraro
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305177369
Release Date: 2015-05-29
Genre: Social Science

Practical and insightful, CLASSIC READINGS IN CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY is a concise, inexpensive, and accessible reader that presents core historical and contemporary works that have been instrumental in shaping anthropological thought and research over the past decades. Carefully edited by author Dr. Gary Ferraro, the text includes classic readings from the disciplines of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Selected from scholarly works on the basis of their enduring themes and contributions to the discipline, these eminently relevant selections enable you to further explore anthropological perspectives on such key topics as culture; language and communication; ecology and economics; marriage and family; gender; politics and social control; supernatural beliefs; and issues of culture change. By providing this wide array of classic reading on foundational topics, this book delivers an excellent introduction to the field of cultural anthropology and the contributions it makes to understanding the world around us. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Deaf in Japan

Author: Karen Nakamura
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080147356X
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

A groundbreaking study of deaf identity, minority politics, and sign language, traces the history of the deaf community in Japan.

Women s Health in Post Soviet Russia

Author: Michele R. Rivkin-Fish
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253217679
Release Date: 2005
Genre: History

"An unparalleled study of a transforming and privatizing Russian health care system, of the promises and perils of prescriptive programs for change, that points to the areas that need change in the change-makers themselves.... part of a larger story about the inherent dangers of current neoliberal economic transformations of fragile post-socialist social welfare arrangements.... "Rivkin-Fish takes the reader into a new understanding of the fragile and tense relations between state and market transitions, and into the deep and largely silent struggle for gender and health equity in Russia." —Adriana Petryna, author of Life Exposed: Biological Citizens after Chernobyl In the first decade after the collapse of the Soviet Union, deteriorating public health indicators such as below-replacement fertility and high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, abortions, birth traumas, and maternal mortality raised acute anxieties about Russia's future. This study documents the efforts of global and local experts, and ordinary Russian women in St. Petersburg, to explain Russia's maternal health problems and devise reforms to solve them. Examining both official health projects and informal daily practices, Michele Rivkin-Fish draws ethnographic and theoretical insights about the contested processes of interpreting and managing neo-liberal transitions in Russia and explores the challenges of bringing anthropological insights to public health interventions for women's empowerment.

Unimagined Community

Author: Robert Thornton
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520942655
Release Date: 2008-09-02
Genre: Social Science

This groundbreaking work, with its unique anthropological approach, sheds new light on a central conundrum surrounding AIDS in Africa. Robert J. Thornton explores why HIV prevalence fell during the 1990s in Uganda despite that country's having one of Africa's highest fertility rates, while during the same period HIV prevalence rose in South Africa, the country with Africa's lowest fertility rate. Thornton finds that culturally and socially determined differences in the structure of sexual networks—rather than changes in individual behavior—were responsible for these radical differences in HIV prevalence. Incorporating such factors as property, mobility, social status, and political authority into our understanding of AIDS transmission, Thornton's analysis also suggests new avenues for fighting the disease worldwide.

The Land of Open Graves

Author: Jason De Leon
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520958685
Release Date: 2015-10-23
Genre: Social Science

In his gripping and provocative debut, anthropologist Jason De León sheds light on one of the most pressing political issues of our time—the human consequences of US immigration policy. The Land of Open Graves reveals the suffering and deaths that occur daily in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona as thousands of undocumented migrants attempt to cross the border from Mexico into the United States. Drawing on the four major fields of anthropology, De León uses an innovative combination of ethnography, archaeology, linguistics, and forensic science to produce a scathing critique of “Prevention through Deterrence,” the federal border enforcement policy that encourages migrants to cross in areas characterized by extreme environmental conditions and high risk of death. For two decades, this policy has failed to deter border crossers while successfully turning the rugged terrain of southern Arizona into a killing field. In harrowing detail, De León chronicles the journeys of people who have made dozens of attempts to cross the border and uncovers the stories of the objects and bodies left behind in the desert. The Land of Open Graves will spark debate and controversy.

Righteous Dopefiend

Author: Philippe I. Bourgois
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520230884
Release Date: 2009-04-29
Genre: Social Science

Explores the world of homelessness and drug addiction in contemporary United States, discussing such themes as violence, race relations, sexuality, family trauma, social inequality, and power relations.

Global Outlaws

Author: Carolyn Nordstrom
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520940635
Release Date: 2007-06-20
Genre: Social Science

Carolyn Nordstrom explores the pathways of global crime in this stunning work of anthropology that has the power to change the way we think about the world. To write this book, she spent three years traveling to hot spots in Africa, Europe, Asia, and the United States investigating the dynamics of illegal trade around the world—from blood diamonds and arms to pharmaceuticals, exotica, and staples like food and oil. Global Outlaws peels away the layers of a vast economy that extends from a war orphan in Angola selling Marlboros on the street to powerful transnational networks reaching across continents and oceans. Nordstrom's extraordinary fieldwork includes interviews with scores of informants, including the smugglers, victims, power elite, and profiteers who populate these economic war zones. Her compelling investigation, showing that the sum total of extra-legal activities represents a significant part of the world's economy, provides a new framework for understanding twenty-first-century economics and economic power. Global Outlaws powerfully reveals the illusions and realities of security in all areas of transport and trade and illuminates many of the difficult ethical problems these extra-legal activities pose.

Chocolate and Corn Flour

Author: Laura A. Lewis
Publisher: Duke University Press Books
ISBN: 0822351323
Release Date: 2012-05-14
Genre: Social Science

Located on Mexico's Pacific coast in a historically black part of the Costa Chica region, the town of San Nicolás has been identified as a center of Afromexican culture by Mexican cultural authorities, journalists, activists, and foreign anthropologists. The majority of the town's residents, however, call themselves morenos (black Indians). In Chocolate and Corn Flour, Laura A. Lewis explores the history and contemporary culture of San Nicolás, focusing on the ways that local inhabitants experience and understand race, blackness, and indigeneity, as well as on the cultural values that outsiders place on the community and its residents. Drawing on more than a decade of fieldwork, Lewis offers a richly detailed and subtle ethnography of the lives and stories of the people of San Nicolás, including community residents who have migrated to the United States. San Nicoladenses, she finds, have complex attitudes toward blackness—as a way of identifying themselves and as a racial and cultural category. They neither consider themselves part of an African diaspora nor deny their heritage. Rather, they acknowledge their hybridity and choose to identify most deeply with their community.

Standing in the Need

Author: Katherine E. Browne
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9781477307397
Release Date: 2015-09-01
Genre: Social Science

Standing in the Need presents an intimate account of an African American family’s ordeal after Hurricane Katrina. Before the storm struck, this family of one hundred fifty members lived in the bayou communities of St. Bernard Parish just outside New Orleans. Rooted there like the wild red iris of the coastal wetlands, the family had gathered for generations to cook and share homemade seafood meals, savor conversation, and refresh their interconnected lives. In this lively narrative, Katherine Browne weaves together voices and experiences from eight years of post-Katrina research. Her story documents the heartbreaking struggles to remake life after everyone in the family faced ruin. Cast against a recovery landscape managed by outsiders, the efforts of family members to help themselves could get no traction; outsiders undermined any sense of their control over the process. In the end, the insights of the story offer hope. Written for a broad audience and supported by an array of photographs and graphics, Standing in the Need offers readers an inside view of life at its most vulnerable.

Conformity and Conflict

Author: James P. Spradley
Publisher: Jill Potash
ISBN: 9780205234103
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Social Science

Demonstrate the nature of culture and its influence on people's lives. For over 40 years, the best-selling Conformity and Conflict has brought together original readings and cutting edge research alongside classic works as a powerful way to study human behavior and events. Its readings cover a broad range of theoretical perspectives and demonstrate basic anthropological concepts. The Fourteenth Edition incorporates successful articles from past editions and fresh ideas from the field to show fascinating perspectives on the human experience. Teaching and Learning Experience Personalize Learning - MyAnthroLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals. Improve Critical Thinking - Articles, article introductions and review questions encourage students to examine their assumptions, discern hidden values, evaluate evidence, assess their conclusions, and more! Engage Students - Section parts, key terms, maps, a glossary and subject index all spark student interest and illustrate the reader's main points with examples and visuals from daily life. Support Instructors - Teaching your course just got easier! You can create a Customized Text or use our Instructor's Manual, Electronic “MyTest” Test Bank or PowerPoint Presentation Slides. Additionally, Conformity and Conflict's part introductions parallel the basic concepts taught in introductory courses – which allow the book to be used alone as a reader or in conjunction with a main text. Note: MyAnthroLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MyAnthroLab, please visit www.MyAnthroLab.com or you can purchase a valuepack of the text + MyAnthroLab (at no additional cost): VP ISBN-10: 0205176011/ISBN-13: 9780205176014

The Everyday Language of White Racism

Author: Jane H. Hill
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444304747
Release Date: 2009-01-30
Genre: Social Science

In The Everyday Language of White Racism, Jane H. Hill provides an incisive analysis of everyday language to reveal the underlying racist stereotypes that continue to circulate in American culture. provides a detailed background on the theory of race and racism reveals how racializing discourse—talk and text that produces and reproduces ideas about races and assigns people to them—facilitates a victim-blaming logic integrates a broad and interdisciplinary range of literature from sociology, social psychology, justice studies, critical legal studies, philosophy, literature, and other disciplines that have studied racism, as well as material from anthropology and sociolinguistics Part of the Blackwell Studies in Discourse and Culture Series