Law and People in Colonial America

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 080185816X
Release Date: 1998-01-21
Genre: History

This revised edition of Law and People in Colonial America will incorporate recent scholarship and encompass American Indians, the French, and Spaniards as people who—on the fringes of English settlement—raised interesting questions. Among them: how in legal terms did the English deal with "marginal"societies; how does this posture help us to understand English law and the changes the New World forced upon it; and how did these people on the outside themselves view English law?

Law and People in Colonial America

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher:
ISBN: UOM:39015039901817
Release Date: 1998
Genre: Law

This revised edition of Law and People in Colonial America will incorporate recent scholarship and encompass American Indians, the French, and Spaniards as people who--on the fringes of English settlement--raised interesting questions. Among them: how in legal terms did the English deal with "marginal" societies; how does this posture help us to understand English law and the changes the New World forced upon it; and how did these people on the outside themselves view English law?

Law and people in colonial America

Author: Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr
ISBN: UOM:39015025007140
Release Date: 1992
Genre: History

Traces the development of the American legal system during colonial times, and examines the influence of law on social, political, and economic relationships

Law in American History

Author: G. Edward White
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195102475
Release Date: 2012-02-20
Genre: History

G. Edward White, a leading legal historian, presents Law in American History, a two-volume, comprehensive narrative history of American law from the colonial period to the present. In this first volume, White explores the key turning points in roughly the first half of the American legal system, from the development of order in the colonies, to the signing of the Constitution, to the dissolution of the Union just before the Civil War. Thought-provoking and artfully written, Law in American History, Vol. 1 is an essential text for both students of law and general readers alike.

The Cambridge History of Law in America

Author: Michael Grossberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521803052
Release Date: 2008-04-28
Genre: History

This volume covers American law from the earliest settlement and colonization of North America.

The Politics of Piracy

Author: Douglas R. Burgess, Jr.
Publisher: ForeEdge from University Press of New England
ISBN: 9781611685275
Release Date: 2014-12-02
Genre: History

The seventeenth-century war on piracy is remembered as a triumph for the English state and her Atlantic colonies. Yet it was piracy and illicit trade that drove a wedge between them, imperiling the American enterprise and bringing the colonies to the verge of rebellion. In The Politics of Piracy, competing criminalities become a lens to examine England's legal relationship with America. In contrast to the rough, unlettered stereotypes associated with them, pirates and illicit traders moved easily in colonial society, attaining respectability and even political office. The goods they provided became a cornerstone of colonial trade, transforming port cities from barren outposts into rich and extravagant capitals. This transformation reached the political sphere as well, as colonial governors furnished local mariners with privateering commissions, presided over prize courts that validated stolen wares, and fiercely defended their prerogatives as vice-admirals. By the end of the century, the social and political structures erected in the colonies to protect illicit trade came to represent a new and potent force: nothing less than an independent American legal system. Tensions between Crown and colonies presage, and may predestine, the ultimate dissolution of their relationship in 1776. Exhaustively researched and rich with anecdotes about the pirates and their pursuers, The Politics of Piracy will be a fascinating read for scholars, enthusiasts, and anyone with an interest in the wild and tumultuous world of the Atlantic buccaneers.

Colonial Law in America

Author: Robert M. Reed
Publisher: Schiffer Pub Limited
ISBN: 0764337807
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

Forty lashes for committing adultery? Children taken from their parents for being unruly? Loss of an ear - or even your life -- for stealing? These were the harsh punishments doled out for such crimes in Colonial America during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Learn what happened to horse thieves and Sabbath breakers or people engaging in idleness in the thirteen original colonies. Accompanied by 30 postcard images, more than twenty-five "crimes" are covered in this view of law and justice in the 1600s and 1700s. It will make you appreciate that you live in the twenty-first century.

The Transatlantic Constitution

Author: Mary Sarah Bilder
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674020944
Release Date: 2008-03-31
Genre: History

Departing from traditional approaches to colonial legal history, Mary Sarah Bilder argues that American law and legal culture developed within the framework of an evolving, unwritten transatlantic constitution that lawyers, legislators, and litigants on both sides of the Atlantic understood. The central tenet of this constitution--that colonial laws and customs could not be repugnant to the laws of England but could diverge for local circumstances--shaped the legal development of the colonial world.

Esteemed Bookes of Lawe and the Legal Culture of Early Virginia

Author: Warren M. Billings
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813939407
Release Date: 2017-02-24
Genre: Law

Virginia men of law constituted one of the first learned professions in colonial America, and Virginia legal culture had an important and lasting impact on American political institutions and jurisprudence. Exploring the book collections of these Virginians therefore offers insight into the history of the book and the intellectual history of early America. It also addresses essential questions of how English culture migrated to the American colonies and was transformed into a distinctive American culture. Focusing on the law books that colonial Virginians acquired, how they used them, and how they eventually produced a native-grown legal literature, this collection explores the law and intellectual culture of the Commonwealth and reveals the origins of a distinctively Virginian legal literature. The contributors argue that understanding the development of early Virginia legal history—as shown through these book collections—not only illuminates important aspects of Virginia’s history and culture; it also underlies a thorough understanding of colonial and revolutionary American history and culture.

Freedom Bound

Author: Christopher Tomlins
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139490931
Release Date: 2010-08-31
Genre: History

Freedom Bound is about the origins of modern America - a history of colonizing, work and civic identity from the beginnings of English presence on the mainland until the Civil War. It is a history of migrants and migrations, of colonizers and colonized, of households and servitude and slavery, and of the freedom all craved and some found. Above all it is a history of the law that framed the entire process. Freedom Bound tells how colonies were planted in occupied territories, how they were populated with migrants - free and unfree - to do the work of colonizing and how the newcomers secured possession. It tells of the new civic lives that seemed possible in new commonwealths and of the constraints that kept many from enjoying them. It follows the story long past the end of the eighteenth century until the American Civil War, when - just for a moment - it seemed that freedom might finally be unbound.

A Colony in a Nation

Author: Chris Hayes
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393254235
Release Date: 2017-03-21
Genre: Social Science

New York Times best-selling author and Emmy Award–winning news anchor Chris Hayes argues that there are really two Americas: a Colony and a Nation. America likes to tell itself that it inhabits a postracial world, yet nearly every empirical measure—wealth, unemployment, incarceration, school segregation—reveals that racial inequality has barely improved since 1968, when Richard Nixon became our first “law and order” president. With the clarity and originality that distinguished his prescient bestseller, Twilight of the Elites, Chris Hayes upends our national conversation on policing and democracy in a book of wide-ranging historical, social, and political analysis. Hayes contends our country has fractured in two: the Colony and the Nation. In the Nation, we venerate the law. In the Colony, we obsess over order, fear trumps civil rights, and aggressive policing resembles occupation. A Colony in a Nation explains how a country founded on justice now looks like something uncomfortably close to a police state. How and why did Americans build a system where conditions in Ferguson and West Baltimore mirror those that sparked the American Revolution? A Colony in a Nation examines the surge in crime that began in the 1960s and peaked in the 1990s, and the unprecedented decline that followed. Drawing on close-hand reporting at flashpoints of racial conflict, as well as deeply personal experiences with policing, Hayes explores cultural touchstones, from the influential “broken windows” theory to the “squeegee men” of late-1980s Manhattan, to show how fear causes us to make dangerous and unfortunate choices, both in our society and at the personal level. With great empathy, he seeks to understand the challenges of policing communities haunted by the omnipresent threat of guns. Most important, he shows that a more democratic and sympathetic justice system already exists—in a place we least suspect. A Colony in a Nation is an essential book—searing and insightful—that will reframe our thinking about law and order in the years to come.

The World of Colonial America

Author: Ignacio Gallup-Diaz
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317662136
Release Date: 2017-04-28
Genre: History

The World of Colonial America: An Atlantic Handbook offers a comprehensive and in-depth survey of cutting-edge research into the communities, cultures, and colonies that comprised colonial America, with a focus on the processes through which communities were created, destroyed, and recreated that were at the heart of the Atlantic experience. With contributions written by leading scholars from a variety of viewpoints, the book explores key topics such as -- The Spanish, French, and Dutch Atlantic empires -- The role of the indigenous people, as imperial allies, trade partners, and opponents of expansion -- Puritanism, Protestantism, Catholicism, and the role of religion in colonization -- The importance of slavery in the development of the colonial economies -- The evolution of core areas, and their relationship to frontier zones -- The emergence of the English imperial state as a hegemonic world power after 1688 -- Regional developments in colonial North America. Bringing together leading scholars in the field to explain the latest research on Colonial America and its place in the Atlantic World, this is an important reference for all advanced students, researchers, and professionals working in the field of early American history or the age of empires.

English Common Law in the Early American Colonies

Author: Paul Samuel Reinsch
Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.
ISBN: 9781584774877
Release Date: 2004
Genre: History

Reinsch, Paul Samuel. English Common Law in the Early American Colonies. Madison: [Bulletin of the University of Wisconsin], 1899. 64 pp. Reprint available December, 2004 by the Lawbook Exchange, Ltd. ISBN 1-58477-487-8. Cloth. $65. * This focused study of the institutional framework of colonial government addresses the colonial policy of the European powers, the motives and methods of colonial expansion, the general forms of colonial government and how the administrative and legislative methods of each colony grew to accommodate them.

Conquest by Law

Author: Lindsay G. Robertson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199881994
Release Date: 2005-08-25
Genre: History

In 1823, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a Supreme Court decision of monumental importance in defining the rights of indigenous peoples throughout the English-speaking world. At the heart of the decision for Johnson v. M'Intosh was a "discovery doctrine" that gave rights of ownership to the European sovereigns who "discovered" the land and converted the indigenous owners into tenants. Though its meaning and intention has been fiercely disputed, more than 175 years later, this doctrine remains the law of the land. In 1991, while investigating the discovery doctrine's historical origins Lindsay Robertson made a startling find; in the basement of a Pennsylvania furniture-maker, he discovered a trunk with the complete corporate records of the Illinois and Wabash Land Companies, the plaintiffs in Johnson v. M'Intosh. Conquest by Law provides, for the first time, the complete and troubling account of the European "discovery" of the Americas. This is a gripping tale of political collusion, detailing how a spurious claim gave rise to a doctrine--intended to be of limited application--which itself gave rise to a massive displacement of persons and the creation of a law that governs indigenous people and their lands to this day.