Lincoln and the Court

Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674040823
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: History

In a meticulously researched and engagingly written narrative, McGinty rescues the story of Abraham Lincoln and the Supreme Court from long and undeserved neglect, recounting the compelling history of the Civil War president's relations with the nation's highest tribunal and the role it played in resolving the agonizing issues raised by the conflict.

Lincoln s Supreme Court

Author: David Mayer Silver
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252067193
Release Date: 1956
Genre: History

More than four decades after its initial publication this book is still the only one to focus exclusively on President Abraham Lincoln's role in modifying the Supreme Court membership to secure the power he needed to save the Union.

The Body of John Merryman

Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674061552
Release Date: 2011-10-05
Genre: History

When Chief Justice Taney declared Lincoln’s suspension of habeas corpus unconstitutional and demanded the release of John Merryman, Lincoln defied the order, offering a forceful counter-argument for the constitutionality of his actions. The result was one of the most significant cases in American legal history—a case that resonates in our own time.

Lincoln s Greatest Case The River the Bridge and the Making of America

Author: Brian McGinty
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780871407856
Release Date: 2015-02-09
Genre: History

The untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight. In May of 1856, the steamboat Effie Afton barreled into a pillar of the Rock Island Bridge, unalterably changing the course of American transportation history. Within a year, long-simmering tensions between powerful steamboat interests and burgeoning railroads exploded, and the nation’s attention, absorbed by the Dred Scott case, was riveted by a new civil trial. Dramatically reenacting the Effie Afton case—from its unlikely inception, complete with a young Abraham Lincoln’s soaring oratory, to the controversial finale—this “masterful” (Christian Science Monitor) account gives us the previously untold story of how one sensational trial propelled a self-taught lawyer and a future president into the national spotlight.

Lincoln on Law Leadership and Life

Author: Jonathan White
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 9781492613992
Release Date: 2015-03-17
Genre: Reference

Wisdom and stories from one of America's most unique legal minds Abraham Lincoln's success as a politician was rooted in experience in the courtroom. Despite a presidency plagued with moral and legal crises, this self-taught prairie lawyer deftly led the nation by relying on the core principles he honed in his early career: honestly, self-discipline, and a powerful sense of social responsibility. Aspiring and practicing lawyers alike often looked to Lincoln for guidance—and his hard-won wisdom is as relevant today as ever. Drawn from his correspondence with aspiring attorneys as well as observations from friends and colleagues, Lincoln on Law, Leadership, and Life is an insightful collection of Lincoln's timeless quotes, quips, and stories. "This should be required reading in every law school in America."—Frank J. Williams, retired Chief Justice, Rhode Island Supreme Court, and founding chair of The Lincoln Forum.

Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation

Author: Mark E. Neely
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807835180
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

The Civil War placed the U.S. Constitution under unprecedented--and, to this day, still unmatched--strain. Neely examines for the first time in one book the U.S. Constitution and its often overlooked cousin, the Confederate Constitution, and the ways the documents shaped the struggle for national survival.

American Justice 2016

Author: Lincoln Caplan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812248906
Release Date: 2016-10-10
Genre: Law

When the Democrat-appointed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, she triggered concerns about judicial ethics. But the political concerns were even more serious. The Supreme Court is supposed to be what Alexander Hamilton called "the least dangerous" branch of government, because it is the least political. Justices have lifetime appointments to ensure their "complete independence" when deciding cases and controversies. But in the Roberts Court's most contested and important rulings, it has divided along partisan lines for the first time in American history: Republican presidents appointed the conservatives, Democrats appointed the liberals. Justice Ginsburg's criticisms suggested that partisan politics drive the Court's most profound disagreements. Well-respected political science supports that view. Has this partisan turn made the Court less independent and less trustworthy than the nation requires? The term ending in 2016 included more decisions and developments in almost fifty years for analyzing this question. Among them were major cases about abortion rights, the death penalty, immigration, and other wedge issues, as well as the death of Justice Antonin G. Scalia, leaving the Court evenly divided between conservatives and liberals. Legal journalist Lincoln Caplan dissects the recent term, puts it in historical context, and recommends ways to strengthen trust in the Supreme Court as the pinnacle of the American constitutional system.

Abraham Lincoln and the Supreme Court

Author: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection
Publisher: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 1334961549
Release Date: 2017-01-10
Genre: Political Science

Excerpt from Abraham Lincoln and the Supreme Court: Roger Taney; Excerpts From Newspapers and Other Sources We do notpropose to discuss this decision. It was the lowest depth. It probably did more than all legislative and executive usurpations to revive the spirit Of liberty, - to recall the'country to the principles Of the founders Of the Constitution. It began the good work,1 evoking the truth, by showing its own fiendish principles, - which the war' is likely to finish forever. We wish, how ever, to give an analysis Of the doctrines and reasons on which his decision was based, and therefrom to show what is the true place Of Roger Brooke Taney as a jurist and a patriot. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Abraham Lincoln and Treason in the Civil War

Author: Jonathan W. White
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807142165
Release Date: 2011-11-07
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

In Abraham Lincoln and Treason in the Civil War, Jonathan White reveals how the arrest and prosecution of this little-known Baltimore farmer had a lasting impact on the Lincoln administration and Congress as they struggled to develop policies to deal with both northern traitors and southern rebels. His work sheds significant new light on several perennially controversial legal and constitutional issues in American history, including the nature and extent of presidential war powers, the development of national policies for dealing with disloyalty and treason, and the protection of civil liberties in wartime.

The Presidents and the Supreme Court

Author: James F. Simon
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451671636
Release Date: 2012-02-07
Genre: History

Collected together, James F. Simon’s books share the bitter struggles and compromises that have characterized the relationship between the presidents and the Supreme Court Chief Justices across US history. The bitter and protracted struggle between President Thomas Jefferson and Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall; the frustration and grudging admiration between FDR and Chief Justice Hughes; the clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney. These were the conflicts that ended slavery, that rescued us from the Great Depression, and that defined a nation—for better and for worse. And, Simon brings them to brilliant and compelling life.

James Madison Hood

Author: George C. Kingston
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 9780786471942
Release Date: 2013-01-24
Genre: History

Captain James Madison Hood was the real U.S. Consul in the novel Anna and the King of Siam, but before his arrival in Bangkok, he was also a merchant ship captain, builder of clipper ships, legislator in both Massachusetts and Illinois, industrialist, and land speculator. He was present at the birth of the Republican Party. As U.S. Consul, he presided over the trial of Dr. Dan Beach Bradley for libel of the French Consul, Gabriel Aubaret, a case which influenced the course of Southeast Asian history and got Anna Leonowens in trouble with King Mongkut. Captain Hood lived large and was not above a little extralegal maneuvering to support his lifestyle. His life is a tour through the politics, economics and deal making of the mid-19th century.

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney

Author: James F. Simon
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743250337
Release Date: 2007-11-20
Genre: History

Traces the clashes between the sixteenth president and his Chief Justice, profiling their disparate views about African-American rights, the South's legal ability to secede, and presidential constitutional powers during wartime.

The Case of Abraham Lincoln

Author: Julie M. Fenster
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 0230610811
Release Date: 2007-11-13
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

The year 1856 was a pivotal one for this country, witnessing the birth of the Republican Party as we know it. But it was also a critical year in the troubled political life of Abraham Lincoln. As a lawyer, he tried his most scandalous murder case. At the same time, he made a decision which unleashed his soaring abilities for the first time, a decision which reverberates to this day: whether or not to join the new Republican Party. The Case of Abraham Lincoln offers the first-ever account of the suspenseful Anderson Murder Case, and Lincoln's role in it. Bestselling historian Fenster not only examines the case that changed Lincoln's fate, but portrays his day-to-day life as a circuit lawyer and how it shaped him as a politician. In a book that draws a picture of Lincoln in court and at home during that memorable season of 1856, Fenster also offers a close-up look at Lincoln's political work, much of it masterful, some of it adventurous, in building the party that would change his fate – and that of the nation.

The Court and the World

Author: Stephen Breyer
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9781101912072
Release Date: 2016-08
Genre: Law

"In this original, far-reaching, and timely book, Justice Stephen Breyer examines the work of the Supreme Court of the United States in an increasingly interconnected world, a world in which all sorts of activity, both public and private--from the conduct of national security policy to the conduct of international trade--obliges the Court to understand and consider circumstances beyond America's borders. It is a world of instant communications, lightning-fast commerce, and shared problems (like public health threats and environmental degradation), and it is one in which the lives of Americans are routinely linked ever more pervasively to those of people in foreign lands. Indeed, at a moment when anyone may engage in direct transactions internationally for services previously bought and sold only locally (lodging, for instance, through online sites), it has become clear that, even in ordinary matters, judicial awareness can no longer stop at the water's edge. To trace how foreign considerations have come to inform the thinking of the Court, Justice Breyer begins with that area of the law in which they have always figured prominently: national security in its constitutional dimension--how should the Court balance this imperative with others, chiefly the protection of basic liberties, in its review of presidential and congressional actions? He goes on to show that as the world has grown steadily "smaller," the Court's horizons have inevitably expanded: it has been obliged to consider a great many more matters that now cross borders. What is the geographical reach of an American statute concerning, say, securities fraud, antitrust violations, or copyright protections? And in deciding such matters, can the Court interpret American laws so that they might work more efficiently with similar laws in other nations? While Americans must necessarily determine their own laws through democratic process, increasingly, the smooth operation of American law--and, by extension, the advancement of American interests and values--depends on its working in harmony with that of other jurisdictions. Justice Breyer describes how the aim of cultivating such harmony, as well as the expansion of the rule of law overall, with its attendant benefits, has drawn American jurists into the relatively new role of "constitutional diplomats," a little remarked but increasingly important job for them in this fast-changing world."--Publisher's description.