Medical Malpractice and the American Jury

Author: Neil Vidmar
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472084798
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Law

In this landmark book, Neil Vidmar looks beyond the common perceptions of medical malpractice litigation and finds a system that is fair, impartial, and intelligent. Firmly grounded in a wealth of empirical data, the author presents a fresh look at a civil jury system that has been maligned as out-of-touch, capricious, and disposed to awarding exorbitant, unjustified amounts to plaintiffs whenever they have the opportunity. In an era when tort reform is high on the congressional agenda, Medical Malpractice and the American Jury is almost alone in voicing reason and fact. Written in a thoroughly inviting, jargon-free style, Medical Malpractice and the American Jury places those cases that go to trial in the broader context of litigation, noting that only about ten percent of malpractice cases ever result in trials. Of those that do go to trial, the author notes, more than two out of three cases are decided in the doctor's favor--repudiating the view that jurors are inherently biased against doctors and are motivated more by sympathy for the plaintiff than by the facts of the case. Neil Vidmar comprehensively addresses all the claims that have been leveled against the performance of malpractice juries. For example, he compares actual jury decisions on negligence with neutral physicians' ratings of whether negligence occurred in the medical treatment and finds a remarkable consistency--repudiating the view that jurors are unable to understand experts or uncritically defer to their opinion. "Medical Malpractice and the American Jury is quite simply the most compelling, comprehensive examination of the American jury system yet written. It brings reason and fact to the debate in a way that puts the lie to the many myths surrounding medical negligence cases. For anyone genuinely interested in just solutions, this book should be required reading. To act in ignorance of its findings invites disaster." --Trial "For anyone really interested in the evidence about the daily grind of the courthouse mill, Neil Vidmar's Medical Malpractice and the American Jury is a good place to start." --Washington Post Book World Neil Vidmar is Professor of Social Science and Law, Duke Law School, and Professor of Psychology, Duke University.

American Juries

Author: Neil Vidmar
Publisher: Prometheus Books
ISBN: 9781615929870
Release Date: 2007
Genre: Social Science

Although the right to trial by jury is enshrined in the U.S. Constitution, in recent years both criminal and civil juries have been criticized as incompetent, biased, and irresponsible. For example, the O.J. Simpson criminal jury's verdict produced a racial divide in opinions about that trial. And many Americans still hold strong views about the jury that awarded millions of dollars to a woman who spilled a cup of McDonald's coffee on herself. It's said that there are judicial hellholes where local juries provide jackpot justice in medical malpractice and product liability cases with corporate defendants. Are these claims valid?This monumental and comprehensive volume reviews over fifty years of empirical research on civil and criminal juries and returns a verdict that strongly supports the jury system. Rather than relying on anecdotes, Vidmar and Hans-renowned scholars of the jury system-place the jury system in its historical and contemporary context, giving the stories behind important trials while providing fact-based answers to critical questions. How do juries make decisions and how do their verdicts compare to those of trial judges and technical experts? What roles do jury consultants play in influencing trial outcomes? Can juries understand complex expert testimony? Under which circumstances do capital juries decide to sentence a defendant to die? Are juries biased against doctors and big business? Should juries be allowed to give punitive damages? How do juries respond to the insanity defense? Do jurors ignore the law?Finally, the authors consider various suggestions for improving the way that juries are asked to carry out their duties. After briefly comparing the American jury to its counterparts in other nations, they conclude that our jury system, despite occasional problems, is, on balance, fair and democratic, and should remain an indispensable component of the judicial process for the foreseeable future.Neil Vidmar, PhD, (Durham, NC), is both the Russell M. Robinson II Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law and a professor of psychology at Duke University. He has published over 100 research articles and is the author, coauthor, or editor of four books including Hans and Vidmar's widely acclaimed Judging the Jury (1986), Medical Malpractice and the American Jury, and World Jury Systems (2000).Valerie P. Hans, PhD (Ithaca, NY), is Professor of Law at Cornell University. She has published more than ninety research papers and articles and is the author, coauthor or editor of five books including Business on Trial (2000); Judging the Jury (1986) and The Jury System (2006). She also serves on the editorial boards of major professional journals in the field of law and social science.

The Medical Malpractice Myth Large Print 16pt

Author: Tom Baker
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 9781459615656
Release Date: 2011-03-01
Genre: Actions and defenses

n January 2005, President Bush declared the medical malpractice liability system ''out of control.''the president's speech was merely an echo of what doctors and politicians (mostly Republicans) have been saying for years - that medical malpractice premiums are skyrocketing due to an explosion in malpractice litigation. Along comes Baker, director of the Insurance Law Center at the University of Connecticut School of Law, to puncture ''the medical malpractice myth'' with a talent for reasoned argument and incisiveness. He counters that the real problem is ''too much medical malpractice, not too much litigation,'' and that the cost of malpractice is lost lives and the ''pain and suffering of tens of thousands of people every year'' - most of whom do not sue. Baker argues that the rise in medical premiums has more to do with economic cycles and the competitive nature of the insurance industry than runaway juries. Finally, Baker offers an alternative in the form of evidence-based medical liability reform that seeks to decrease the incidence of malpractice and also protect doctors from rising premium costs. Having worked with insurance companies, law firms and doctors, Baker brings experience and perspective to his book, which is sure to be important and controversial in future debates.

Medical Malpractice in Nineteenth Century America

Author: Kenneth De Ville
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814744161
Release Date: 1992-04-01
Genre: History

Highly readable . . . . interdisciplinary history of a high order. -- The Historian Well-written and superbly documented . . . . Both physicians and lawyers will find this book useful and fascinating. -- Journal of the American Medical Association This is the first book-length historical study of medical malpractice in 19th-century America and it is exceedingly well done . . . . The author reveals that, beginning in the 1840s, Americans began to initiate malpractice lawsuits against their physicians and surgeons. Among the reasons for this development were the decline in the belief in divine providence, increased competition between physicians and medical sects, and advances in medical science that led to unrealistically high expectations of the ability of physicians to cure . . . . This book is well written, often entertaining and witty, and is historically accurate, based on the best secondary, as well as primary sources from the time period. Highly recommended. -- Choice Adept at not only traditional historical research but also cultural studies, the author treats the reader to an intriguing discussion of how 19th-century Americans came truly to see their bodies differently . . . . a sophisticated new standard in the field of malpractice history. -- The Journal of the Early Republic By far the best compilation and analysis of early medical malpractice cases I have seen . . . . this excellently crafted study is bound to be of interest to a large number of readers. -- James C. Mohr, author of Abortion in America: The Origins and Evolution of a National Policy

Medical Malpractice on Trial

Author: Paul C. Weiler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674561201
Release Date: 1991
Genre: Law

Examines the medical malpractice crisis, suggests shifting insurance responsibility from doctors to hospitals, and proposes a no-fault liability system

New Jersey Medical Malpractice Law

Author: Abbott S. Brown
Publisher: New Jersey Law Journal
ISBN: 1576258084
Release Date: 2014-07-17
Genre: Law

"New Jersey Medical Malpractice Law "addresses issues as they commonly arise through the litigation process from considering the elements of a malpractice cause of action, through investigating and preparing a case, to managing trial issues."

A Measure of Malpractice

Author: Paul C. Weiler
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674558804
Release Date: 1993-01
Genre: Law

A Measure of Malpractice tells the story and presents the results of the Harvard Medical Practice Study, the largest and most comprehensive investigation ever undertaken of the performance of the medical malpractice system. The Harvard study was commissioned by the government of New York in 1986, in the midst of a malpractice crisis that had driven insurance premiums for surgeons and obstetricians in New York City to nearly $200,000 a year. The Harvard-based team of doctors, lawyers, economists, and statisticians set out to investigate what was actually happening to patients in hospitals and to doctors in courtrooms, launching a far more informed debate about the future of medical liability in the 1990s. Careful analysis of the medical records of 30,000 patients hospitalized in 1984 showed that approximately one in twenty-five patients suffered a disabling medical injury, one quarter of these as a result of the negligence of a doctor or other provider. After assembling all the malpractice claims filed in New York State since 1975, the authors found that just one in eight patients who had been victims of negligence actually filed a malpractice claim, and more than two-thirds of these claims were filed by the wrong patients. The study team then interviewed injured patients in the sample to discover the actual financial loss they had experienced: the key finding was that for roughly the same dollar amount now being spent on a tort system that compensates only a handful of victims, it would be possible to fund comprehensive disability insurance for all patients significantly disabled by a medical accident. The authors, who came to the project from very different perspectives about the present malpractice system, are now in agreement about the value of a new model of medical liability. Rather than merely tinker with the current system which fixes primary legal responsibility on individual doctors who can be proved medically negligent-legislatures should encourage health care organizations to take responsibility for the financial losses of all patients injured in their care.

Civil Juries and the Politics of Reform

Author: Stephen Daniels
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810111217
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Law

Stephen Daniels and Joanne Martin have analyzed patterns in jury verdicts in a number of substantive legal areas, including medical malpractice, products liability, and punitive damages, against the background of the larger political and academic debate over tort reform. Civil Juries and the Politics of Reform brings together and summarizes the authors' extensive empirical research on civil jury verdicts in the context of that debate. Some commentators are arguing that there is a substantial gap between the image of juries and civil justice that is driving tort reform and what is known of the reality of the civil justice system. The authors use their discussion of juries not simply to help inform the policy debate but to analyze tort reform as a public policy issue for what it tells about the policy process itself.

Why Lawsuits are Good for America

Author: Carl T. Bogus
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814737941
Release Date: 2003-07-01
Genre: Law

Judging by the frequency with which it makes an appearance in television news shows and late night stand up routines, the frivolous lawsuit has become part and parcel of our national culture. A woman sues McDonald’s because she was scalded when she spilled her coffee. Thousands file lawsuits claiming they were injured by Agent Orange, silicone breast implants, or Bendectin although scientists report these substances do not cause the diseases in question. The United States, conventional wisdom has it, is a hyperlitigious society, propelled by avaricious lawyers, harebrained judges, and runaway juries. Lawsuits waste money and time and, moreover, many are simply groundless. Carl T. Bogus is not so sure. In Why Lawsuits Are Good for America, Bogus argues that common law works far better than commonly understood. Indeed, Bogus contends that while the system can and occasionally does produce “wrong” results, it is very difficult for it to make flatly irrational decisions. Blending history, theory, empirical data, and colorful case studies, Bogus explains why the common law, rather than being outdated, may be more necessary than ever. As Bogus sees it, the common law is an essential adjunct to governmental regulation—essential, in part, because it is not as easily manipulated by big business. Meanwhile, big business has launched an all out war on the common law. “Tort reform”—measures designed to make more difficult for individuals to sue corporations—one of the ten proposals in the Republican Contract With America, and George W. Bush’s first major initiative as Governor of Texas. And much of what we have come to believe about the system comes from a coordinated propaganda effort by big business and its allies. Bogus makes a compelling case for the necessity of safeguarding the system from current assaults. Why Lawsuits Are Good for America provides broad historical overviews of the development of American common law, torts, products liability, as well as fresh and provocative arguments about the role of the system of “disciplined democracy” in the twenty-first century.

The Preparation and Trial of Medical Malpractice Cases

Author: Richard E. Shandell
Publisher: Law Journal Press
ISBN: 1588520080
Release Date: 2017-09-28
Genre: Law

This book offers comprehensive coverage of the questions surrounding health maintenance organizations, including case law on the right to sue an HMO as well as its participating physicians.

Defending Medical Malpractice Claims

Author:
Publisher: Aspatore Books
ISBN: 0314284672
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Law

Defending Medical Malpractice Claims provides an authoritative, insiders perspective on developing an effective medical malpractice defense. Featuring partners from law firms across the nation, these experts guide the reader through the process of representing doctors and health care providers in medical malpractice cases. These top lawyers offer advice on navigating the discovery process, selecting good experts, demonstrating the client acted appropriately, and helping clients avoid future medical malpractice claims. Additionally, these attorneys discuss legal protections for doctors and health care providers, common types and targets of lawsuits, and the increasing role of technology in this area of law. The different niches represented and the breadth of perspectives presented enable readers to get inside some of the great legal minds of today, as these experienced lawyers offer up their thoughts on the keys to success within this ever-evolving field.

Civil Juries and Civil Justice

Author: Brian H. Bornstein
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 0387744908
Release Date: 2007-12-03
Genre: Psychology

At last, here is an empirical volume that addresses head-on the thorny issue of tort reform in the US. Ongoing policy debates regarding tort reform have led both legal analysts and empirical researchers to reevaluate the civil jury’s role in meting out civil justice. Some reform advocates have called for removing certain types of more complex cases from the jury’s purview; yet much of the policy debate has proceeded in the absence of data on what the effects of such reforms would be. In addressing these issues, this crucial work takes an empirical approach, relying on archival and experimental data. It stands at the vanguard of the debate and provides information relevant to both state and national civil justice systems.

Medical Professional Liability and the Delivery of Obstetrical Care

Author: Institute of Medicine
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309185955
Release Date: 1989-01-01
Genre: Medical

This is the first part of an in-depth study focusing on medical liability and its effect on access to and delivery of obstetrical care. The book addresses such questions as: Do liability concerns impede the use of new technologies? Have liability issues affected the physician-patient relationship? Are community health and maternity centers being harmed? What specific remedies are being considered and what are their prospects for success?