Midnight Basketball

Author: Douglas Hartmann
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226374987
Release Date: 2016-07-28
Genre: History

Sport-based intervention programs designed to divert poor minority youth from gangs and crime got their start with the Midnight Basketball initiatives of the late 1980s. Hartmann explains the mystery of why a basketball- based program became popular as a solution to problems of crime and poverty in dozens of American cities. In part, then, this book is a history, but also a cultural analysis to explain the prominence of these programs at first (and then so controversial later on), and how they were expanded upon in the years that followed. In fact, it was in Chicagohome of Michael Jordan and the Bullsthat Midnight Basketball first achieved prominence. Under the direction of former Congressman Jack Kemp and the Chicago Housing Authority, two leagues were organized, in Rockwell Gardens and the Henry Horner Homes. To understand why the program caught on, Hartmann explores the policy transformations of the period (such as the new penology and neoliberal paternalism), and, at length, he gets into the cultural tensions and institutional realities that shaped this program and the entire field of sport-based social policy. In the end, Midnight Basketball, Race, and Neoliberal Social Policy provides a one-of-a-kind view of the culture of sport and race in America, and neoliberal policy broadly conceived."

Sport and Social Movements

Author: Jean Harvey
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9781780935577
Release Date: 2013-11-21
Genre: Sports & Recreation

From neighborhood coalitions organizing against the building of a sport facility for professional sports teams subsidized by public funds, to global campaigns for equity for women in sport, to worldwide bans of apartheid regimes, sites and levels of protest, resistance and activism have been present throughout the history of sport. Contentious forms of collective actions are now ever more present in various forms at the local, the national and the global levels. Sport and Social Movements: From the Local to the Global is the first book-length treatment of the way social movements have intersected and continue to intersect with sport. It traces the history of various social movements associated with labour, women, peace, the environment and rights (civil, racial, disability and sexual), and their relationship to sport and sports mega-events such as the Olympic Games. Based on research conducted by a multinational team of authors that draws on theories of social movements and new social movements, the book includes a valuable chronology of social movements, illustrations of key episodes in the development of the relationships between sport and different social movements and an agenda for future research and scholarship. Written in a clear and comprehensive style it is suitable for all levels of higher education, researchers and the general reader who want to know more about the role that sport has played in the development of social movements and campaigns for social justice.

Crossings to Adulthood

Author: Teresa Toguchi Swartz
Publisher: Youth in a Globalizing World
ISBN: 900433646X
Release Date: 2017
Genre: Family & Relationships

Crossings to Adulthood: How Diverse Young Americans Understand and Navigate Their Lives, draws on more than 400 interviews with diverse young adults to examine how young Americans understand their lives and the challenges they face as they move into adulthood.

Race Culture and the Revolt of the Black Athlete

Author: Douglas Hartmann
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226318567
Release Date: 2004-01-01
Genre: History

Ever since 1968 a single iconic image of race in American sport has remained indelibly etched on our collective memory: sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos accepting medals at the Mexico City Olympics with their black-gloved fists raised and heads bowed. But what inspired their protest? What happened after they stepped down from the podium? And how did their gesture impact racial inequalities? Drawing on extensive archival research and newly gathered oral histories, Douglas Hartmann sets out to answer these questions, reconsidering this pivotal event in the history of American sport. He places Smith and Carlos within the broader context of the civil rights movement and the controversial revolt of the black athlete. Although the movement drew widespread criticism, it also led to fundamental reforms in the organizational structure of American amateur athletics. Moving from historical narrative to cultural analysis, Hartmann explores what we can learn about the complex relations between race and sport in contemporary America from this episode and its aftermath.

Migration Incorporation and Change in an Interconnected World

Author: Syed Ali
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317556763
Release Date: 2015-01-09
Genre: Social Science

Written in engaging and approachable prose, Migration, Incorporation, and Change in an Interconnected World covers the bulk of material a student needs to get a good sense of the empirical and theoretical trends in the field of migration studies, while being short enough that professors can easily build their courses around it without hesitating to assign additional readings. Taking a unique approach, Ali and Hartmann focus on what they consider the important topics and the potential route the field is going to take, and incorporate a conceptual lens that makes this much more than a simple relaying of facts.

Targeting Investments in Children

Author: Phillip B. Levine
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226475837
Release Date: 2010-10-15
Genre: Business & Economics

A substantial number of American children experience poverty: about 17 percent of those under the age of eighteen meet the government’s definition, and the proportion is even greater within minority groups. Childhood poverty can have lifelong effects, resulting in poor educational, labor market, and physical and mental health outcomes for adults. These problems have long been recognized, and there are numerous programs designed to alleviate or even eliminate poverty; as these programs compete for scarce resources, it is important to develop a clear view of their impact as tools for poverty alleviation. Targeting Investments in Children tackles the problem of evaluating these programs by examining them using a common metric: their impact on earnings in adulthood. The volume’s contributors explore a variety of issues, such as the effect of interventions targeted at children of different ages, and study a range of programs, including child care, after-school care, and drug prevention. The results will be invaluable to educational leaders and researchers as well as policy makers.

Child s Play

Author: Michael A. Messner
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813571478
Release Date: 2016-05
Genre: Family & Relationships

Is sport good for kids? When answering this question, both critics and advocates of youth sports tend to fixate on matters of health, whether condemning contact sports for their concussion risk or prescribing athletics as a cure for the childhood obesity epidemic. Child’s Play presents a more nuanced examination of the issue, considering not only the physical impacts of youth athletics, but its psychological and social ramifications as well. The eleven original scholarly essays in this collection provide a probing look into how sports—in community athletic leagues, in schools, and even on television—play a major role in how young people view themselves, shape their identities, and imagine their place in society. Rather than focusing exclusively on self-proclaimed jocks, the book considers how the culture of sports affects a wide variety of children and young people, including those who opt out of athletics. Not only does Child’s Play examine disparities across lines of race, class, and gender, it also offers detailed examinations of how various minority populations, from transgender youth to Muslim immigrant girls, have participated in youth sports. Taken together, these essays offer a wide range of approaches to understanding the sociology of youth sports, including data-driven analyses that examine national trends, as well as ethnographic research that gives a voice to individual kids. Child’s Play thus presents a comprehensive and compelling analysis of how, for better and for worse, the culture of sports is integral to the development of young people—and with them, the future of our society.

Crime and the Punished

Author: Douglas Hartmann
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 0393920380
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Social Science

The second volume in this series tackles crime and punishment. As in the first volume, the chapters are organized into three main sections. “Core Contributions” exemplifies how sociologists and other social scientists think about otherwise familiar phenomena like crime, incarceration, and suicide. Chapters in the “Cultural Contexts” section engage crime in cultural realms—from politics to families to international crime and justice—that are often ignored or taken for granted among laypeople or in other social science disciplines. Finally, the “Critical Takes” chapters provide sociological commentary, perspective, and reflections on crime and its control.

Controlling Crime

Author: Philip J. Cook
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226115127
Release Date: 2011-10-15
Genre: Business & Economics

Criminal justice expenditures have more than doubled since the 1980s, dramatically increasing costs to the public. With state and local revenue shortfalls resulting from the recent recession, the question of whether crime control can be accomplished either with fewer resources or by investing those resources in areas other than the criminal justice system is all the more relevant. Controlling Crime considers alternative ways to reduce crime that do not sacrifice public safety. Among the topics considered here are criminal justice system reform, social policy, and government policies affecting alcohol abuse, drugs, and private crime prevention. Particular attention is paid to the respective roles of both the private sector and government agencies. Through a broad conceptual framework and a careful review of the relevant literature, this volume provides insight into the important trends and patterns of some of the interventions that may be effective in reducing crime.

Polite Protest

Author: Richard B. Pierce
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 025311134X
Release Date: 2005-02-15
Genre: History

This history of the black community of Indianapolis in the 20th century focuses on methods of political action -- protracted negotiations, interracial coalitions, petition, and legal challenge -- employed to secure their civil rights. These methods of "polite protest" set Indianapolis apart from many Northern cities. Richard B. Pierce looks at how the black community worked to alter the political and social culture of Indianapolis. As local leaders became concerned with the city's image, black leaders found it possible to achieve gains by working with whites inside the existing power structure, while continuing to press for further reform and advancement. Pierce describes how Indianapolis differed from its Northern cousins such as Milwaukee, Chicago, and Detroit. Here, the city's people, black and white, created their own patterns and platforms of racial relations in the public and cultural spheres.

The Race between Education and Technology

Author: Claudia Dale Goldin
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674037731
Release Date: 2009-06-30
Genre: Business & Economics

This book provides a careful historical analysis of the co-evolution of educational attainment and the wage structure in the United States through the twentieth century. During the first eight decades of the twentieth century, the increase of educated workers was higher than the demand for them. This boosted income for most people and lowered inequality. However, the reverse has been true since about 1980. The authors discuss the complex reasons for this educational slow-down and what might be done to ameliorate it.

Twelve Weeks to Change a Life

Author: Max A. Greenberg
Publisher: University of California Press
ISBN: 9780520297746
Release Date: 2019-01-08
Genre: Social Science

Hailed as a means to transform cultural norms and change lives, violence prevention programs signal a slow-rolling policy revolution that has reached nearly two-thirds of young people in the United States today. Max A. Greenberg takes us inside the booming market for programming and onto the asphalt campuses of Los Angeles where these programs are implemented, many just one hour a week for 12 weeks. He spotlights how these ephemeral programs, built on troves of risk data, are disconnected from the lived experiences of the young people they were created to support. Going beyond the narrow stories told about at-risk youth through data and in policy, Greenberg sketches a vivid portrait of young men and women coming of age and forming relationships in a world of abiding harm and fleeting, fragmented support. At the same time, Greenberg maps the minefield of historical and structural inequalities that program facilitators must navigate to build meaningful connections with the youth they serve. Taken together, these programs shape the stories and politics of a generation and reveal how social policy can go wrong when it ignores the lives of young people.

The Contexts Reader

Author: Douglas Hartmann
Publisher: W. W. Norton
ISBN: 0393912329
Release Date: 2011-10-01
Genre: Social Science

At head of title: American Sociological Association.

Elite Transition

Author: Patrick Bond
Publisher: Pluto Press
ISBN: 0745334784
Release Date: 2014-09-20
Genre: History

Released to coincide with the 20th anniversary of the end of Apartheid in South Africa, this is a fully revised and updated edition of a best-selling work of political analysis. Patrick Bond, a former adviser to the African National Congress (ANC), investigates how groups such as the ANC went from being a force of liberation to a vehicle now perceived as serving the economic interests of an elite few. This edition includes new analysis looking at the 2004 election and the crisis which shook the country following the massacre of miners at Marikana in 2012. Bond also asses the historiography of the transition written since 2000 from nationalist, liberal and radical perspectives, and replies to critics of his work, both from liberal and nationalist perspectives. The provocative and though-provoking final chapter, 'From Racial to Class Apartheid', is a compelling conclusion to this essential text on post-Apartheid South Africa, which will be vital reading for all who study or have an interest in this part of the continent, and in social change more widely.

Writing the World of Policing

Author: Didier Fassin
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226497648
Release Date: 2017-10-25
Genre: Social Science

In his edited collection Writing the World of Policing: The Difference Ethnography Makes, renowned anthropologist-sociologist Didier Fassin brings together some of the greatest minds in the social sciences to reflect on the question of urban policing in disadvantaged neighborhoods worldwide. The aim of the volume is both to show how ethnography can illuminate the role of policing in society as well as to show how an attention to law enforcement can alter and provoke the practice of ethnography itself. Spanning five continents and tackling such concepts as accountability, complicity, morality, detention, alibi, and others, this volume is bound to become one of the major statements on a topic of increasing interest. Structured around three sections--position, observation, and description--the book mirrors the process of the ethnographic method itself, taking us deep within each local context it investigates while never losing sight of the global relevance of crime, law, and the exercise of power inherent to both.