Murder Among Friends

Author: Jonnie Jacobs
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1523882905
Release Date: 2016-02-05
Genre:

Was Mona Sterling's death really a suicide? And who was that strange man lurking near Anna's school? As Kate searches for answers, she runs head-on into the unsavory side of suburban living.

Delivering the Truth

Author: Edith Maxwell
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide
ISBN: 9780738747859
Release Date: 2016-04-08
Genre: Fiction

Quaker midwife Rose Carroll discovers dark secrets in 1888 Massachusetts For Quaker midwife Rose Carroll, life in Amesbury, Massachusetts, provides equal measures of joy and tribulation. She delights in attending to the needs of mothers and newborns even as she mourns the recent death of her sister. Likewise, Rose enjoys the giddy feelings that come from being courted by a handsome doctor, but a suspicious fire and two murders leave her fearing for the well-being of her loved ones. Driven by her desire for safety and justice, Rose Carroll begins asking questions related to the crimes. Consulting with her friends and neighbors—including the famous Quaker poet John Greenleaf Whittier—Rose draws on her strengths as a counselor and problem solver in trying to bring the perpetrators to light. Praise: “First of hopefully many more to come, I believe that everyone will definitely enjoy this stand-out book.”—Suspense Magazine “A highly competent mystery.”—Kirkus Reviews “Rose Carroll is a richly crafted and appealing sleuth. A terrific historical read.”—Rhys Bowen, New York Times bestselling author "The historical setting is redolent and delicious, the townspeople engaging, and the plot a proper puzzle, but it's Rose Carroll—midwife, Quaker, sleuth—who captivates in this irresistible series debut."—Catriona McPherson, award-winning author of the Dandy Gilver series.

The Palatine Wreck

Author: Jill Farinelli
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 9781512601176
Release Date: 2017-09-05
Genre: History

Two days after Christmas in 1738, a British merchant ship traveling from Rotterdam to Philadelphia grounded in a blizzard on the northern tip of Block Island, twelve miles off the Rhode Island coast. The ship carried emigrants from the Palatinate and its neighboring territories in what is now southwest Germany. The 105 passengers and crew on board-sick, frozen, and starving-were all that remained of the 340 men, women, and children who had left their homeland the previous spring. They now found themselves castaways, on the verge of death, and at the mercy of a community of strangers whose language they did not speak. Shortly after the wreck, rumors began to circulate that the passengers had been mistreated by the ship's crew and by some of the islanders. The stories persisted, transforming over time as stories do and, in less than a hundred years, two terrifying versions of the event had emerged. In one account, the crew murdered the captain, extorted money from the passengers by prolonging the voyage and withholding food, then abandoned ship. In the other, the islanders lured the ship ashore with a false signal light, then murdered and robbed all on board. Some claimed the ship was set ablaze to hide evidence of these crimes, their stories fueled by reports of a fiery ghost ship first seen drifting in Block Island Sound on the one-year anniversary of the wreck. These tales became known as the legend of the Palatine, the name given to the ship in later years, when its original name had been long forgotten. The flaming apparition was nicknamed the Palatine Light. The eerie phenomenon has been witnessed by hundreds of people over the centuries, and numerous scientific theories have been offered as to its origin. Its continued reappearances, along with the attention of some of nineteenth-century America's most notable writers-among them Richard Henry Dana Sr., John Greenleaf Whittier, Edward Everett Hale, and Thomas Wentworth Higginson-has helped keep the legend alive. This despite evidence that the vessel, whose actual name was the Princess Augusta, was never abandoned, lured ashore, or destroyed by fire. So how did the rumors begin? What really happened to the Princess Augusta and the passengers she carried on her final, fatal voyage? Through years of painstaking research, Jill Farinelli reconstructs the origins of one of New England's most chilling maritime mysteries.

Snowbound with Zombies

Author: John Greenleaf Whittier
Publisher: Post Mortem Press
ISBN: 0692525637
Release Date: 2015-09-10
Genre: Fiction

Snowbound with Zombies is a collection of 22 short supernatural stories inspired by the life and works of John Greenleaf Whittier. All proceeds benefit the Whittier Birthplace museum. Although primarily remembered for his poems celebrating rural life, Whittier also relished a good ghost story - his poetry includes tales of witchcraft, clairvoyance, deviltry, premonitions, and ghosts. His first book was not of poetry, but a study of local superstitions, The Legends of New England, which includes retelling such tales as a schoolmarm whose murdered child briefly appears and drives her to confess, a demon fiddler who forces a party to dance until their legs wear down to bloody stumps, and various references to the Robert Burns poem "Tam o' Shanter" with its witches sabbath in a haunted church. Stories from Samuel T. Pickard, John M. McIlveen, Peter Rawlik, Christopher Golden, Scott T. Goudsward, Morven Westfield, Celia Thaxter, Stuart Conover, W.H. Pugmire, Roxanne Dent, Ken Faig, Jr., Judi Calhoun, Tracy L. Carbone, K.H. Vaughan, Joseph A Citro, Kristi Petersen Schoonover, Karen Dent, Hannah Gonsman, David Bernard, Michelle Souliere, Gregory L. Norris, John G. Whittier, and Faye Ringel. Introduction by Tim Coco Edited by David Goudsward

American Bloomsbury

Author: Susan Cheever
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9780743298704
Release Date: 2006-12-19
Genre: History

Even the most devoted readers of nineteenth-century American literature often assume that the men and women behind the masterpieces were as dull and staid as the era's static daguerreotypes. Susan Cheever's latest work, however, brings new life to the well-known literary personages who produced such cherished works as The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, Walden, and Little Women. Rendering in full color the tumultuous, often scandalous lives of these volatile and vulnerable geniuses, Cheever's dynamic narrative reminds us that, while these literary heroes now seem secure of their spots in the canon, they were once considered avant-garde, bohemian types, at odds with the establishment. These remarkable men and women were so improbably concentrated in placid Concord, Massachusetts, that Henry James referred to the town as the "biggest little place in America." Among the host of luminaries who floated in and out of Concord's "American Bloomsbury" as satellites of the venerable intellect and prodigious fortune of Ralph Waldo Emerson were Henry David Thoreau -- perpetual second to his mentor in both love and career; Louisa May Alcott -- dreamy girl and ambitious spinster; Nathaniel Hawthorne -- dilettante and cad; and Margaret Fuller -- glamorous editor and foreign correspondent. Perhaps inevitably, given the smallness of the place and the idiosyncrasies of its residents, the members of the prestigious circle became both intellectually and romantically entangled: Thoreau serenaded an infatuated Louisa on his flute. Vying with Hawthorne for Fuller's attention, Emerson wrote the fiery feminist love letters while she resided (yards away from his wife) in his guest room. Herman Melville was, according to some, ultimately driven mad by his consuming and unrequited affection for Hawthorne. Far from typically Victorian, this group of intellectuals, like their British Bloomsbury counterparts to whom the title refers, not only questioned established literary forms, but also resisted old moral and social strictures. Thoreau, of course, famously retreated to a plot of land on Walden Pond to escape capitalism, pick berries, and ponder nature. More shocking was the group's ambivalence toward the institution of marriage. Inclined to bend the rules of its bonds, many of its members spent time at the notorious commune, Brook Farm, and because liberal theories could not entirely guarantee against jealousy, the tension of real or imagined infidelities was always near the surface. Susan Cheever reacquaints us with the sexy, subversive side of Concord's nineteenth-century intellectuals, restoring in three dimensions the literary personalities whose work is at the heart of our national history and cultural identity.

Tamerlane Other Poems

Author: Edgar Allan Poe
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 1522838368
Release Date: 2015-12-19
Genre:

'Tamerlane & Other Poems' represents Poe's first foray into the literary world. From my point of view, it's clear that he was hesitant about how his work would be received, and was further hesitant about being the individual associated with having produced it. This is something that, as a writer, I understand completely. Were I a writer of Poe's caliber, however, I would most assuredly worry a great deal less. This volume is a faithful reproduction of the original text of the seminal work, first published in a run of fifty volumes in 1897, of which only twelve are known to have survived to the modern day. I have chosen to exclude any and all of his future works so that the original compilation may be absorbed as a singular whole, with nothing more to cloud perceptions about the author's original desires to be heard and enjoyed.

The Perfect Murder

Author: Hugh Janes
Publisher:
ISBN: 0573019541
Release Date: 2001
Genre: Detective and mystery plays, English

Carla Moorland has been murdered, and John Hoskins, who had been having an affair with her, knows who did it - himself. John's wife Elizabeth, rather than calling the police, is determined to keep John out of prison, even if it means that an innocent man will be punished for the crime.