Native American Artifacts of Wisconsin

Author: Paul Schanen
Publisher:
ISBN: 1932113681
Release Date: 2013-09-01
Genre: Art

Native American Artifacts of Wisconsin is designed to bridge the gap between the professional and amateur archaeologist. In an easy and logical format, it serves as an excellent reference on the prehistoric artifacts found specifically in Wisconsin. The guide provides time periods, detailed drawings, artifact photos, and documented discovery locations quickly and easily, without the reader having to wade through lengthy journal entries or detailed scholarly papers. In addition, Paul Schanen and David Hunzicker provide guidelines to collectors about the importance of documenting the circumstances and locations of their own artifact finds and how best to share this information with others in order to increase our collective knowledge about these priceless, prehistoric artifacts and the populations who created and used them. Only through careful unearthing, detailed documentation and collaborative sharing will we learn about the people(s) that lived thousands of years ago. No doubt much remains for us to discover about Native Americans from the daily tools they used as they farmed, hunted, lived, hoped, dreamed, and died among the very same forests, hills and streams Wisconsin residents call home today.

Indian Mounds of Wisconsin

Author: Robert A. Birmingham
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres
ISBN: 9780299313647
Release Date: 2017-10-04
Genre: History

Wisconsin's thousands of effigy mounds and other ancient earthworks are a treasure of world civilization. This popular introduction for general readers, updated throughout with new archaeological findings and satellite imagery, answers the questions, Who built the mounds? When and why were they built? Where can they be viewed?

Aztalan

Author: Robert A. Birmingham
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 9780870205187
Release Date: 2014-03-07
Genre: Social Science

Aztalan has remained a mystery since the early nineteenth century when it was discovered by settlers who came to the Crawfish River, fifty miles west of Milwaukee. Who were the early indigenous people who inhabited this place? When did they live here? Why did they disappear? Birmingham and Goldstein attempt to unlock some of the mysteries, providing insights and information about the group of people who first settled here in 1100 AD. Filled with maps, drawings, and photographs of artifacts, this small volume examines a time before modern Native American people settled in this area.

Native American Communities in Wisconsin 1600 1960

Author: Robert E. Bieder
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299145239
Release Date: 1995-05-01
Genre: History

The first comprehensive history of Native American tribes in Wisconsin, this thorough and thoroughly readable account follows Wisconsin’s Indian communities—Ojibwa, Potawatomie, Menominee, Winnebago, Oneida, Stockbridge-Munsee, and Ottawa—from the 1600s through 1960. Written for students and general readers, it covers in detail the ways that native communities have striven to shape and maintain their traditions in the face of enormous external pressures. The author, Robert E. Bieder, begins by describing the Wisconsin region in the 1600s—both the natural environment, with its profound significance for Native American peoples, and the territories of the many tribal cultures throughout the region—and then surveys experiences with French, British, and, finally, American contact. Using native legends and historical and ethnological sources, Bieder describes how the Wisconsin communities adapted first to the influx of Indian groups fleeing the expanding Iroquois Confederacy in eastern America and then to the arrival of fur traders, lumber men, and farmers. Economic shifts and general social forces, he shows, brought about massive adjustments in diet, settlement patterns, politics, and religion, leading to a redefinition of native tradition. Historical photographs and maps illustrate the text, and an extensive bibliography has many suggestions for further reading.

Indian Names on Wisconsin s Map

Author: Virgil J. Vogel
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299129845
Release Date: 1991
Genre: History

"Of all the states of the American union, none has a name that has been spelled in more ways, or interpreted more variously, than Wisconsin. Among the spellings listed are Mesconsin, Meskousing, Mishkonsing, Ouisconsens, Ouisconsin, Ouisconsing, Ouiscousing, Ouiskonsin, Owisconsing, Quisconsing, Weeskonsan, Wisconsan, Wisconsin, Wishkonsing, and Wiskonsin. The name has been attributed to the French, Menominee, Ojibwa, Potawatami, Sauk-Fox, and Winnebago languages." Place names are cultural artifacts that tell us as much about how people lived as do relics dug from the ground, writes Virgil Vogel, one of America's foremost authorities on place names. They are historical records from which the location and migration of people, plants, and animals can be charted. Onalaska and Aztalan, not surprisingly, are place names transplanted to Wisconsin from the far north and south. Some names tell of topographic features that have long since disappeared or are little noticed today. Beaver Dam once had an Indian name meaning just that; Sheboygan, "big pipe" in Ojibwa, described the shape of a river bend. Other names are vestiges of ancient languages nowhere else recorded. Some commemorate historic events: Winneconne is believed by many to mean "place of the skulls." The Indian names of Wisconsin's towns, rivers, and lakes reveal the minds of the Indian peoples, their cosmic views, their values, their relation to their environment , and their ways of life and convey as well something of the history of their white invaders. Virgil Vogel's thirty years of research into Native American influence on geographical names has resulted in an absorbing account that illuminates the history and culture of Wisconsin Indians. Vogel tells his story thematically—names from the spirit world, names of trails and portages, French-Indian personal names, tribal names, and so on—to show that place names are part of a larger cultural and natural world. In recovering the history and meaning of these names, he has restored an important and colorful part of America's heritage.

Native People of Wisconsin Revised Edition

Author: Patty Loew
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 9780870207518
Release Date: 2015-10-06
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

"So many of the children in this classroom are Ho-Chunk, and it brings history alive to them and makes it clear to the rest of us too that this isn't just...Natives riding on horseback. There are still Natives in our society today, and we're working together and living side by side. So we need to learn about their ways as well." --Amy Laundrie, former Lake Delton Elementary School fourth grade teacher An essential title for the upper elementary classroom, "Native People of Wisconsin" fills the need for accurate and authentic teaching materials about Wisconsin's Indian Nations. Based on her research for her award-winning title for adults, "Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Survival," author Patty Loew has tailored this book specifically for young readers. "Native People of Wisconsin" tells the stories of the twelve Native Nations in Wisconsin, including the Native people's incredible resilience despite rapid change and the impact of European arrivals on Native culture. Young readers will become familiar with the unique cultural traditions, tribal history, and life today for each nation. Complete with maps, illustrations, and a detailed glossary of terms, this highly anticipated new edition includes two new chapters on the Brothertown Indian Nation and urban Indians, as well as updates on each tribe's current history and new profiles of outstanding young people from every nation.

Wisconsin Native Americans

Author: Carole Marsh
Publisher: Gallopade International
ISBN: 0635089815
Release Date: 2011-03-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

One of the most popular misconceptions about American Indians is that they are all the same-one homogenous group of people who look alike, speak the same language, and share the same customs and history. Nothing could be further from the truth! This book gives kids an A-Z look at the Native Americans that shaped their state's history. From tribe to tribe, there are large differences in clothing, housing, life-styles, and cultural practices. Help kids explore Native American history by starting with the Native Americans that might have been in their very own backyard! Some of the activities include crossword puzzles, fill in the blanks, and decipher the code.

Spirits of Earth

Author: Robert A. Birmingham
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299232634
Release Date: 2009-12-18
Genre: Social Science

Between A.D. 700 and 1100 Native Americans built more effigy mounds in Wisconsin than anywhere else in North America, with an estimated 1,300 mounds—including the world’s largest known bird effigy—at the center of effigy-building culture in and around Madison, Wisconsin. These huge earthworks, sculpted in the shape of birds, mammals, and other figures, have aroused curiosity for generations and together comprise a vast effigy mound ceremonial landscape. Farming and industrialization destroyed most of these mounds, leaving the mysteries of who built them and why they were made. The remaining mounds are protected today and many can be visited. explores the cultural, historical, and ceremonial meanings of the mounds in an informative, abundantly illustrated book and guide. Finalist, Social Science, Midwest Book Awards

Hidden Thunder

Author: Geri Schrab
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 9780870207686
Release Date: 2016-08-24
Genre: Art

In Hidden Thunder, renowned watercolor artist Geri Schrab and archaeologist Robert "Ernie" Boszhardt give readers an up-close-and-personal look at rock art. With an eye toward preservation, Schrab and Boszhardt take you with them as they research, document, and interpret at the ancient petroglyphs and pictographs made my Native Americans in past millennia. In addition to publicly accessible sites such as Wisconsin’s Roche-a-Cri State Park and Minnesota’s Jeffers Petroglyphs, Hidden Thunder covers the artistic treasures found at several remote and inaccessible rock art sites—revealing the ancient stories through words, full-color photographs, and artistic renditions. Offering the duo perspectives of scientist and artist, Boszhardt shares the facts that archaeologists have been able to establish about these important artifacts of our early history, while Schrab offers the artist's experience, describing her emotional and creative response upon encountering and painting these sites. Viewpoints by members of the Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Ojibwe, and other Native nations offer additional insight on the historic and cultural significance of these sites. Together these myriad voices reveal layers of meaning and cultural context that emphasize why these fragile resources—often marred by human graffiti and mishandling or damage from the elements—need to be preserved.

Stone Age Spear and Arrow Points of the Midcontinental and Eastern United States

Author: Noel D. Justice
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253209854
Release Date: 1995
Genre: History

"This is an important new reference work for the professional archaeologist as well as the student and collector." —Central States Archaeological Journal "Justice... admirably synthesizes the scientific information integrating it with the popular approach. The result is a publication that readers on both sides of the spectrum should enjoy as well as comprehend." —Choice "... an indispensable guide to the literature. Attractive layout, design, and printing accent the useful text.... it should remain the standard reference on point typology of the midwest and eastern United States for many years to come." —Pennsylvania Archaeologist Archaeologists and amateur collectors alike will rejoice at this important reference work that surveys, describes, and categorizes the projectile points and cutting tools used in prehistory by the Indians in what are now the middle and eastern sections of the United States, from 12,000 B.C. to the beginning of the historic period. Mr. Justice describes over 120 separate types of stone arrowheads and spear points according to period, culture, and region. His detailed drawings show how Native Americans shaped their tools, what styles were peculiar to which regions, and how the various types can best be identified. There are over 485 drawings organized by type cluster and other identifying characteristics. The work also includes distribution maps and 111 examples in color.

Native People of Wisconsin

Author: Patty Loew
Publisher: Wisconsin Historical Society
ISBN: 9780870203480
Release Date: 2003
Genre: Social Science

Introduces the twelve Indian nations that live in Wisconsin, presenting tribal stories that incorporate various ways Native people remember the past, and emphasizing the value of oral tradition.

Wisconsin Underground

Author: Doris Green
Publisher: Big Earth Publishing
ISBN: 0915024853
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Travel

Details and gives directions to more than 20 accessible caves, including some in northeastern Iowa; descriptions of lead and zinc mines in Wisconsin and northern Illinois, and copper and iron mines in Michigan's Upper Peninsula; includes a guide to railroad tunnels and other underground spaces that were created for specific purposes, including beer and wine storage, human escape routes, and lead shot production.

Indian Culture and European Trade Goods

Author: George Irving Quimby
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299040747
Release Date: 1966
Genre: History

In an absorbing account of the archaeology and culture of Indian tribes in the Great Lakes region from 1600 to 1820, George Quimby recounts the results of decades of careful study of archaeological sites in this 1966 classic.

Twelve Millennia

Author: James L Theler
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 9781587294396
Release Date: 2005-04-01
Genre: History

The people of Taquile Island on the Peruvian side of beautiful Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable lake in the Americas, are renowned for the hand-woven textiles that they both wear and sell to outsiders. One thousand seven hundred Quechua-speaking peasant farmers, who depend on potatoes and the fish from the lake, host the forty thousand tourists who visit their island each year. Yet only twenty-five years ago, few tourists had even heard of Taquile. In Weaving a Future: Tourism, Cloth, and Culture on an Andean Island, Elayne Zorn documents the remarkable transformation of the isolated rocky island into a community-controlled enterprise that now provides a model for indigenous communities worldwide. Over the course of three decades and nearly two years living on Taquile Island, Zorn, who is trained in both the arts and anthropology, learned to weave from Taquilean women. She also learned how gender structures both the traditional lifestyles and the changes that tourism and transnationalism have brought. In her comprehensive and accessible study, she reveals how Taquileans used their isolation, landownership, and communal organizations to negotiate the pitfalls of globalization and modernization and even to benefit from tourism. This multi-sited ethnography set in Peru, Washington, D.C., and New York City shows why and how cloth remains central to Andean society and how the marketing of textiles provided the experience and money for Taquilean initiatives in controlling tourism. The first book about tourism in South America that centers on traditional arts as well as community control, Weaving a Future will be of great interest to anthropologists and scholars and practitioners of tourism, grassroots development, and the fiber arts.