Black Nature

Author: Camille T. Dungy
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820332772
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Poetry

Black Nature is the first anthology to focus on nature writing by African American poets, a genre that until now has not commonly been counted as one in which African American poets have participated. Black poets have a long tradition of incorporating treatments of the natural world into their work, but it is often read as political, historical, or protest poetry--anything but nature poetry. This is particularly true when the definition of what constitutes nature writing is limited to work about the pastoral or the wild. Camille T. Dungy has selected 180 poems from 93 poets that provide unique perspectives on American social and literary history to broaden our concept of nature poetry and African American poetics. This collection features major writers such as Phillis Wheatley, Rita Dove, Yusef Komunyakaa, Gwendolyn Brooks, Sterling Brown, Robert Hayden, Wanda Coleman, Natasha Trethewey, and Melvin B. Tolson as well as newer talents such as Douglas Kearney, Major Jackson, and Janice Harrington. Included are poets writing out of slavery, Reconstruction, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century African American poetic movements. Black Nature brings to the fore a neglected and vital means of considering poetry by African Americans and nature-related poetry as a whole. A Friends Fund Publication.

Earth My Likeness

Author: Walt Whitman
Publisher: North Atlantic Books
ISBN: 9781556439100
Release Date: 2010
Genre: Poetry

Viktoras Kulvinskas, co-founder of the Hippocrates Health Institute in Boston with Ann Wigmore, is considered to be the grandfather of the living foods movement and has a huge following

Towards a Romantic Conception of Nature

Author: Hendrik Roelof Rookmaaker
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027222150
Release Date: 1984-01-01
Genre: Poetry

This study describes in detail the development of Coleridge's attitude to nature as it is reflected in his poetry. It analyses the different stages of Coleridge's search for a meaningful relation to nature from an uncritical adoption of the eighteenth century conventions in his early poetry to a projectionist view in his poems of 1802. It offers challenging new readings of some of Coleridge's major poems like 'The Ancient Mariner' and 'Dejection: an Ode', and tries to rehabilitate some minor ones, like 'The Picture'. Attention is also paid to his relation with Wordsworth. It discusses in detail the philosophical background of Coleridge's views and considers the contribution of German thought to his development. As a whole this study affords a new insight into the genesis of romanticism in England.

In the First Country of Places

Author: Louise Chawla
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791420744
Release Date: 1994-09-08
Genre: Philosophy

These authors describe their relationships with nature and childhood in the context of major Western traditions of philosophy and religion. Each poet confronts the Western image of an alien nature within which histories of individuals are insignificant, and three poets elaborate alternative versions of connection with nature and their own past.

Can Poetry Save the Earth

Author: John Felstiner
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300155532
Release Date: 2009-04-01
Genre: Literary Criticism

In forty brief and lucid chapters, Felstiner presents those voices that have most strongly spoken to and for the natural world. Poets- from the Romantics through Whitman and Dickinson to Elizabeth Bishop and Gary Snyder- have helped us envision such details as ocean winds eroding and rebuilding dunes in the same breath, wild deer freezing in our presence, and a person carving initials on a still-living stranded whale.

Gale Researcher Guide for Nature Poetry

Author: Terry Gifford
Publisher: Gale, Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781535853576
Release Date:
Genre: Study Aids

Gale Researcher Guide for: Nature Poetry is selected from Gale's academic platform Gale Researcher. These study guides provide peer-reviewed articles that allow students early success in finding scholarly materials and to gain the confidence and vocabulary needed to pursue deeper research.

Women Poets in the Victorian Era

Author: Fabienne Moine
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781134776603
Release Date: 2016-03-09
Genre: Literary Criticism

Examining the place of nature in Victorian women's poetry, Fabienne Moine explores the work of canonical and long-neglected women poets to show the myriad connections between women and nature during the period. At the same time, she challenges essentialist discourses that assume innate affinities between women and the natural world. Rather, Moine shows, Victorian women poets mobilised these alliances to defend common interests and express their engagement with social issues. While well-known poets such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti are well-represented in Moine's study, she pays particular attention to lesser known writers such as Mary Howitt or Eliza Cook who were popular during their lifetimes or Edith Nesbit, whose verse has received scant critical attention so far. She also brings to the fore the poetry of many non-professional poets. Looking to their immediate cultural environments for inspiration, these women reconstructed the natural world in poems that raise questions about the validity and the scope of representations of nature, ultimately questioning or undermining social practices that mould and often fossilise cultural identities.

A Book of Nature Poems

Author: William Cole
Publisher: Viking Pr
ISBN: 0670180068
Release Date: 1969-04-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

A collection of poems, both old and new, about the many facets of nature throughout the year.

Green Voices

Author: Terry Gifford
Publisher: Manchester University Press
ISBN: 0719043468
Release Date: 1995
Genre: Literary Criticism

The author here argues that the traditions of Pope and Goldsmith are continued in the present day by the likes of R.S. Thomas, George Mackay Brown, and others work in an 'anti-pastoralist' tradition of Crabbe and Clare. A chapter examining the attitudes towards the environment of sixteen contemporary poets concludes a lively ecological introduction to modern poetry.

The Life Around Us

Author: Denise Levertov
Publisher: New Directions Publishing
ISBN: 0811213528
Release Date: 1997
Genre: Poetry

Gathered here in one handy volume are 62 poems about nature and the ecology. But, as the author notes in her preface, these are not all praise-poems"celebration and fear of loss are necessarily conjoined". This compact gift-book will have special appeal to those who love Mother Earth.

Back from the Far Field

Author: Bernard W. Quetchenbach
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813919541
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Literary Criticism

Many poets writing after World War II have found the individual focus of contemporary poetics poorly suited to making statements directed at public issues and public ethics. The desire to invest such individualized poetry with greater cultural authority presented difficulties for Vietnam-protest poets, for example, and it has been a particular challenge for nature writers in the Thoreau tradition who have attempted to serve as advocates for the natural world. Examining the implications of this dilemma, Bernard W. Quetchenbach locates the poets Robert Bly, Gary Snyder, and Wendell Berry within two traditions: the American nature-writing tradition, and the newer tradition of contemporary poetics. He compares the work of two other twentieth-century poets, Robinson Jeffers and Theodore Roethke, to illustrate how the "contemporary shift" toward a poetics focused on the poet's life has affected portrayals of nature and the "public voice" in poetry. Turning back to the work of Bly, Snyder, and Berry, Quetchenbach assesses their attempts to reinvent the public voice in the context of contemporary poetics and what effect these attempts have had on their work. He argues that these poets have learned from their postwar generation techniques for adapting a personalized poetics to environmental advocacy. In addition to modifying what critics have called the "poetics of immediacy," these poets have augmented their poetic output with prose and identified themselves with long-standing traditions of poetic, ethical, and spiritual authority. In doing so, Bly, Snyder, and Berry have attempted to solve not only a problem inherent in contemporary poetics but also the larger problem of the role of the poet in a society that does not recognize poetry. While it would be an overstatement to suggest that these three figures have found a place for the poet in American life, they have reached audiences that extend beyond traditional readers of poetry. At the end of the twentieth century, Quetchenbach concludes, poets have begun to identify, and direct their writing to, specific audiences defined less by aesthetic preferences and more by a shared interest in and dedication to the work's subject matter. Whether revealing a disturbing trend for poetry or an encouraging one for environmentalism and other political causes, it is one of many provocative conclusions Quetchenbach draws from his examination of postwar nature poetry.

Nature Poetry

Author: Sheila Griffin Llanas
Publisher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 9781464404313
Release Date: 2014-01-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction

Nature poetry discovers the deep connection between humanity and nature. Beyond describing the wild beauty found in nature, the poetry discusses nature's impact on humans and people's impact on nature. Author Sheila Griffin Llanas explores eight poems and poets, with chapters on William Wordsworth, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and five others. Accompanied by biographical information on the poet and end-of-chapter questions for further study, Llanas closely examines each poem, including detailed analysis of form, content, poetic technique, and theme, encouraging readers to develop the tools to understand and appreciate poetry.