Navajo Sovereignty

Author: Lloyd L. Lee
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816536177
Release Date: 2017-04-11
Genre: Social Science

The last few decades have given rise to an electrifying movement of Native American activism, scholarship, and creative work challenging five hundred years of U.S. colonization of Native lands. Indigenous communities are envisioning and building their nations and are making decolonial strides toward regaining power from colonial forces. The Navajo Nation is among the many Native nations in the United States pushing back. In this new book, Diné author Lloyd L. Lee asks fellow Navajo scholars, writers, and community members to envision sovereignty for the Navajo Nation. He asks, (1) what is Navajo sovereignty, (2) how do various Navajo institutions exercise sovereignty, (3) what challenges does Navajo sovereignty face in the coming generations, and (4) how did individual Diné envision sovereignty? Contributors expand from the questions Lee lays before them to touch on how Navajo sovereignty is understood in Western law, how various institutions of the Navajo Nation exercise sovereignty, what challenges it faces in coming generations, and how individual Diné envision power, authority, and autonomy for the people. A companion to Diné Perspectives: Revitalizing and Reclaiming Navajo Thought, each chapter offers the contributors’ individual perspectives. The book, which is organized into four parts, discusses Western law’s view of Diné sovereignty, research, activism, creativity, and community, and Navajo sovereignty in traditional education. Above all, Lee and the contributing scholars and community members call for the rethinking of Navajo sovereignty in a way more rooted in Navajo beliefs, culture, and values. Contributors: Raymond D. Austin Bidtah N. Becker Manley A. Begay, Jr. Avery Denny Larry W. Emerson Colleen Gorman Michelle L. Hale Michael Lerma Leola Tsinnajinnie

Din Perspectives

Author: Lloyd Lance Lee
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816530922
Release Date: 2014-05-08
Genre: Social Science

"The contributors to this pathbreaking book, both scholars and community members, are Navajo (Dinâe) people who are coming to personal terms with the complex matrix of Dinâe culture. Their contributions exemplify how Indigenous peoples are creatively applying tools of decolonization and critical research to re-create Indigenous thought and culture for contemporary times"--

Guided by the Mountains

Author: Michael Lerma
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780190639877
Release Date: 2017-01-16
Genre: Political Science

What do traditional Indigenous institutions of governance offer to our understanding of the contemporary challenges faced by the Navajo Nation today and tomorrow? Guided by the Mountains looks at the tensions between Indigenous political philosophy and the challenges faced by Indigenous nations in building political institutions that address contemporary problems and enact "good governance." Specifically, it looks at Navajo, or Diné, political thought, focusing on traditional Diné institutions that offer "a new (old) understanding of contemporary governance challenges" facing the Navajo Nation. Arguing not only for the existence but also the persistence of traditional Navajo political thought and policy, Guided by the Mountains asserts that "traditional" Indigenous philosophy provides a model for creating effective governance institutions that address current issues faced by Indigenous nations. Incorporating both visual interpretations and narrative accounts of traditional and contemporary Diné institutions of government from Diné philosophers, the book is the first to represent Indigenous philosophy as the foundation behind traditional and contemporary governance. It also explains how Diné governance institutions operated during Pre-Contact and Post-Contact times. This path-breaking book stands as the first-time normative account of Diné philosophy.

Reclaiming Din History

Author: Jennifer Nez Denetdale
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816532711
Release Date: 2015-09-01
Genre: History

In this groundbreaking book, the first Navajo to earn a doctorate in history seeks to rewrite Navajo history. Reared on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico and Arizona, Jennifer Nez Denetdale is the great-great-great-granddaughter of a well-known Navajo chief, Manuelito (1816–1894), and his nearly unknown wife, Juanita (1845–1910). Stimulated in part by seeing photographs of these ancestors, she began to explore her family history as a way of examining broader issues in Navajo historiography. Here she presents a thought-provoking examination of the construction of the history of the Navajo people (Diné, in the Navajo language) that underlines the dichotomy between Navajo and non-Navajo perspectives on the Diné past. Reclaiming Diné History has two primary objectives. First, Denetdale interrogates histories that privilege Manuelito and marginalize Juanita in order to demonstrate some of the ways that writing about the Diné has been biased by non-Navajo views of assimilation and gender. Second, she reveals how Navajo narratives, including oral histories and stories kept by matrilineal clans, serve as vehicles to convey Navajo beliefs and values. By scrutinizing stories about Juanita, she both underscores the centrality of women’s roles in Navajo society and illustrates how oral tradition has been used to organize social units, connect Navajos to the land, and interpret the past. She argues that these same stories, read with an awareness of Navajo creation narratives, reveal previously unrecognized Navajo perspectives on the past. And she contends that a similarly culture-sensitive re-viewing of the Diné can lead to the production of a Navajo-centered history.

Claiming Turtle Mountain s Constitution

Author: Keith Richotte Jr.
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469634524
Release Date: 2017-08-04
Genre: History

In an auditorium in Belcourt, North Dakota, on a chilly October day in 1932, Robert Bruce and his fellow tribal citizens held the political fate of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians in their hands. Bruce, and the others, had been asked to adopt a tribal constitution, but he was unhappy with the document, as it limited tribal governmental authority. However, white authorities told the tribal nation that the proposed constitution was a necessary step in bringing a lawsuit against the federal government over a long-standing land dispute. Bruce's choice, and the choice of his fellow citizens, has shaped tribal governance on the reservation ever since that fateful day. In this book, Keith Richotte Jr. offers a critical examination of one tribal nation's decision to adopt a constitution. By asking why the citizens of Turtle Mountain voted to adopt the document despite perceived flaws, he confronts assumptions about how tribal constitutions came to be, reexamines the status of tribal governments in the present, and offers a fresh set of questions as we look to the future of governance in Native America and beyond.

Indigenous Community based Education

Author: Stephen May
Publisher: Multilingual Matters
ISBN: 1853594504
Release Date: 1999-01-01
Genre: Education

This edited collection provides examples of indigenous community-based initiatives from around the world. Examples include programmes among Maori in Aotearoa/New Zealand, Sámi in Norway, Aboriginal People in Australia, Innu in Canada, and Native Americans in the mainland US, Hawai'i, Canada and South America. Contributors include indigenous educational practitioners, and indigenous and non-indigenous academics long associated with the study of indigenous education.

A Land Apart

Author: Flannery Burke
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816528417
Release Date: 2017-05-02
Genre: History

"A new kind of history of the Southwest (mainly New Mexico and Arizona) that foregrounds the stories of Latino and Indigenous peoples who made the Southwest matter to the nation in the twentieth century"--Provided by publisher.

Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law

Author: Raymond Darrel Austin
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816665358
Release Date: 2009
Genre: Social Science

The Navajo Nation court system is the largest and most established tribal legal system in the world. Since the landmark 1959 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Williams v. Lee that affirmed tribal court authority over reservation-based claims, the Navajo Nation has been at the vanguard of a far-reaching, transformative jurisprudential movement among Indian tribes in North America and indigenous peoples around the world to retrieve and use traditional values to address contemporary legal issues. A justice on the Navajo Nation Supreme Court for sixteen years, Justice Raymond D. Austin has been deeply involved in the movement to develop tribal courts and tribal law as effective means of modern self-government. He has written foundational opinions that have established Navajo common law and, throughout his legal career, has recognized the benefit of tribal customs and traditions as tools of restorative justice. In Navajo Courts and Navajo Common Law, Justice Austin considers the history and implications of how the Navajo Nation courts apply foundational Navajo doctrines to modern legal issues. He explains key Navajo foundational concepts like Hózhó (harmony), K'é (peacefulness and solidarity), and K'éí (kinship) both within the Navajo cultural context and, using the case method of legal analysis, as they are adapted and applied by Navajo judges in virtually every important area of legal life in the tribe. In addition to detailed case studies, Justice Austin provides a broad view of tribal law, documenting the development of tribal courts as important institutions of indigenous self-governance and outlining how other indigenous peoples, both in North America and elsewhere around the world, can draw on traditional precepts to achieve self-determination and self-government, solve community problems, and control their own futures.

Red Pedagogy

Author: Sandy Grande
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781610489904
Release Date: 2015-09-28
Genre: Education

This ground-breaking text explores the intersection between dominant modes of critical educational theory and the socio-political landscape of American Indian education. Grande asserts that, with few exceptions, the matters of Indigenous people and Indian education have been either largely ignored or indiscriminately absorbed within critical theories of education.

The Sign of the Beaver

Author: Elizabeth George Speare
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547348703
Release Date: 1983-04-27
Genre: Juvenile Fiction

Although he faces responsibility bravely, thirteen-year-old Matt is more than a little apprehensive when his father leaves him alone to guard their new cabin in the wilderness. When a renegade white stranger steals his gun, Matt realizes he has no way to shoot game or to protect himself. When Matt meets Attean, a boy in the Beaver clan, he begins to better understand their way of life and their growing problem in adapting to the white man and the changing frontier. Elizabeth George Speare’s Newbery Honor-winning survival story is filled with wonderful detail about living in the wilderness and the relationships that formed between settlers and natives in the 1700s. Now with an introduction by Joseph Bruchac.

Native Historians Write Back

Author: Susan Allison Miller
Publisher:
ISBN: 0896726991
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

"A first-of-its-kind anthology of historical articles by Indigenous scholars, framed in assumptions and concepts derived from the authors' respective Indigenous worldviews. Writings stand in sharp contrast to works by historians who may belong to tribes but work within the Euroamerican worldview"--Provided by publisher.

A Companion to the Anthropology of American Indians

Author: Thomas Biolsi
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781405156127
Release Date: 2008-04-15
Genre: Social Science

This Companion is comprised of 27 original contributions by leading scholars in the field and summarizes the state of anthropological knowledge of Indian peoples, as well as the history that got us to this point. Surveys the full range of American Indian anthropology: from ecological and political-economic questions to topics concerning religion, language, and expressive culture Each chapter provides definitive coverage of its topic, as well as situating ethnographic and ethnohistorical data into larger frameworks Explores anthropology’s contribution to knowledge, its historic and ongoing complicities with colonialism, and its political and ethical obligations toward the people 'studied'

Therapeutic Nations

Author: Dian Million
Publisher: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816530182
Release Date: 2013-09-26
Genre: Social Science

Therapeutic Nations is one of the first books to demonstrate trauma's wide-ranging historical origins, and it offers a new indigenous feminist critique ofthe conversation of healing. Million's theoretical sophistication and original research make the book relevant across a range of disciplines as it challenges key concepts of American Indian and indigenous studies

Language and Materiality

Author: Jillian R. Cavanaugh
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781107180949
Release Date: 2017-10-19
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines

Language and Materiality argues the importance of analyzing language use with an eye toward new materialisms, semiotics, and ideology.

A New Partnership

Author: Judith P. Zinsser
Publisher: Unesco
ISBN: UOM:39015033994313
Release Date: 1994
Genre: Education

A guide aimed at teachers in both primary and secondary schools, elucidating indigenous people's close links with their environment, discussing their rights, values, traditions and languages, and analysing the different phases in a growing partnership with the United Nations system. Includes resource material for classroom use.