Nest in the Wind

Author: Martha C. Ward
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 9781478610540
Release Date: 2004-10-21
Genre: Social Science

During her first visit to the beautiful island of Pohnpei in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, anthropologist Martha Ward discovered people who grew quarter-ton yams in secret and ritually shared a powerful drink called kava. She managed a medical research project, ate dog, became pregnant, and responded to spells placed on her. Thirty years later she returned to Pohnpei to learn what had happened there since her first visit. Were islanders still relaxed and casual about sex? Were they still obsessed with titles and social rank? Was the island still lush and beautiful? Had the inhabitants remained healthy? This second edition of Wards best-selling account is a rare, longitudinal study that tracks people, processes, and a place through decades of change. It is also an intimate record of doing fieldwork that immerses readers in the sights, smells, tastes, sounds, and the sensory richness of Pohnpei. Ward addresses the ageless ethnographic questions about family life, politics, religion, traditional medicine, magic, and death together with contemporary concerns about postcolonial survival, the discontinuities of culture, and adaptation to the demands of a global age. Her insightful discoveries illuminate the evolution of a culture possibly distant from yet important to people living in other parts of the world.

Village on the Edge

Author: Michael French Smith
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824826094
Release Date: 2002-01
Genre: History

Kragur village lies on the rugged north shore of Kairiru, a steep volcanic island just off the north coast of Papua New Guinea. In 1998 the village looked much as it had some twenty-two years earlier when author Michael French Smith first visited. But he soon found that changing circumstances were shaking things up. Village on the Edge weaves together the story of Kragur villagers' struggle to find their own path toward the future with the story of Papua New Guinea's travails in the post-independence era. Smith writes of his own experiences as well, living and working in Papua New Guinea and trying to understand the complexities of an unfamiliar way of life. To tell all these stories, he delves into ghosts, magic, myths, ancestors, bookkeeping, tourism, the World Bank, the Holy Spirits, and the meaning of progress and development. Village on the Edge draws on the insights of cultural anthropology but is written for anyone interested in Papua New Guinea.

Nan

Author: Sharon Bohn Gmelch
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 9781478608820
Release Date: 1991-05-01
Genre: Social Science

Margaret Mead Award finalist! Nan Donohoe was an Irish Travelling woman, one of Ireland’s indigenous gypsies or “tinkers.” Traditionally, they traveled the countryside making and repairing tinware, sweeping chimneys, selling small household wares, and doing odd-job work. Over time, they came to live on the roadside in trailers and in government-built camps. Told largely in her own voice, Nan’s saga begins in 1919 with her birth in a tent in the Irish Midlands; it follows her life in Ireland and England, in countryside and city slums, through adversity and adventure. Gmelch brings to her task not only the resources of anthropology, but the skill of a sensitive writer and a warmth that allows her to see Nan as a person, not a subject. What emerges is a human story, filled with cruelty and compassion, sorrow and humor, bad luck and good.

Young and Defiant in Tehran

Author: Shahram Khosravi
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812206814
Release Date: 2011-09-28
Genre: Social Science

With more than half its population under twenty years old, Iran is one of the world's most youthful nations. The Iranian state characterizes its youth population in two ways: as a homogeneous mass, "an army of twenty millions" devoted to the Revolution, and as alienated, inauthentic, Westernized consumers who constitute a threat to the society. Much of the focus of the Islamic regime has been on ways to protect Iranian young people from moral hazards and to prevent them from providing a gateway for cultural invasion from the West. Iranian authorities express their anxieties through campaigns that target the young generation and its lifestyle and have led to the criminalization of many of the behaviors that make up youth culture. In this ethnography of contemporary youth culture in Iran's capital, Shahram Khosravi examines how young Tehranis struggle for identity in the battle over the right to self-expression. Khosravi looks closely at the strictures confronting Iranian youth and the ways transnational cultural influences penetrate and flourish. Focusing on gathering places such as shopping centers and coffee shops, Khosravi examines the practices of everyday life through which young Tehranis demonstrate defiance against the official culture and parental dominance. In addition to being sites of opposition, Khosravi argues, these alternative spaces serve as creative centers for expression and, above all, imagination. His analysis reveals the transformative power these spaces have and how they enable young Iranians to develop their own culture as well as individual and generational identities. The text is enriched by examples from literature and cinema and by livid reports from the author's fieldwork.

A History of the Pacific Islands

Author: Steven Roger Fischer
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9781137205957
Release Date: 2013-03-13
Genre: History

This wide-ranging study of the Pacific Islands provides a dynamic and provocative account of the peopling of the Pacific, and its broad impact on world history. Spanning nearly 50,000 years of human presence in an area which comprises one-third of our planet - Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia - the narrative follows the development of the region, from New Guinea's earliest settlement to the creation of the modern Pacific states. It also examines the fascinating processes which have contributed to the formation of the hybrid Pacific we know today. A History of the Pacific Islands - traces the extraordinarily varied genealogy of all Pacific peoples, looking at their descent from Papuan tribesmen, Austronesian mariners and foreign colonists - examines the rich inheritance of the Islands as a consequence of succeeding waves of invading, then dominating peoples - explores the effect on the region - as well as the corresponding global implications - of voyaging, whaling, pandemics, colonization, trade, exploitation, war, nuclear testing and nationhood Informed by the most recent research and scholarship, Steven Roger Fischer's unique text provides a comprehensive yet concise overview of the Pacific Island's past. It is a highly accessible and invaluable introduction to the history of an area which is currently emerging as pivotal in international affairs.

Border Landscapes

Author: Janet C. Sturgeon
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295801735
Release Date: 2012-06-27
Genre: Social Science

In this comparative, interdisciplinary study based on extensive fieldwork as well as historical sources, Janet Sturgeon examines the different trajectories of landscape change and land use among communities who call themselves Akha (known as Hani in China) in contrasting political contexts. She shows how, over the last century, processes of state formation, construction of ethnic identity, and regional security concerns have contributed to very different outcomes for Akha and their forests in China and Thailand, with Chinese Akha functioning as citizens and grain producers, and Akha in Thailand being viewed as "non-Thai" forest destroyers. The modern nation-state grapples with local power hierarchies on the periphery of the nation, with varied outcomes. Citizenship in China helps Akha better protect a fluid set of livelihood practices that confer benefits on them and their landscape. Denied such citizenship in Thailand, Akha are helpless when forests and other resources are ruthlessly claimed by the state. Drawing on current anthropological debates on the state in Southeast Asia and more generally on debates on property theory, states and minorities, and political ecology, Sturgeon shows how people live in a continuous state of negotiated boundaries - political, social, and ecological. This pioneering comparison of resource access and land use among historically related peoples in two nation-states will be welcomed by scholars of political ecology, environmental anthropology, ethnicity, and politics of state formation in East and Southeast Asia.

Never in Anger

Author: Jean L. Briggs
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674608283
Release Date: 1970
Genre: Social Science

Describes emotional patterning of the Utkuhikhalingmiut, a small group of Eskimos who live at the mouth of the Back River, in the context of their life as seen as lived by the author. Based on field work conducted between June 1963 and March 1965.

Nunavut Generations

Author: Ann McElroy
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 9781478609612
Release Date: 2007-10-08
Genre: Social Science

Change in arctic populations has not been a sudden phenomenon, but rather a gradual process that has occurred over a number of generations. In this longitudinal case study, McElroy introduces readers to four Baffin Island communities in the eastern Canadian Arctic and focuses on the challenges and hardships they face in transition from hunting-gathering lifestyles to wage employment and political participation in towns. Through long-term fieldwork, historical material, and life histories collected from elders, Nunavut Generations richly illustrates political and ecological change alongside native stability and self-determination.

Pacific Island Legends

Author: Bo Flood
Publisher: Bess Press
ISBN: 157306078X
Release Date: 1999-01
Genre: Fiction

Collects forty-three historical or traditional stories from the Pacific Islands, including creation myths and stories of gods, heroes, and ordinary people.

The Hidden Life of Tirol

Author: Martha Coonfield Ward
Publisher: Waveland PressInc
ISBN: UOM:39076001498729
Release Date: 1993
Genre: Tyrol (Austria)

This text is an ethnography that describes how the people of this high mountain region put meaning into their collective lives & how they organize the social structure of mountain survival. In addition, the author describes how the Tiroleans have suffered & solved major ethnic problems.

Iran Divided

Author: Shireen T. Hunter
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9781442233201
Release Date: 2014-09-17
Genre: Political Science

Iranian politics has been marked by sharp ideological divisions and infighting. These divides, kept largely out of public view until the 1990s, came to greater light with the contested 2009 presidential elections. To explain the diverse and complex forces that led to this event and that animate Iran’s current fractured society and polity, author Shireen T. Hunter looks beyond the battle between the forces of reform and reaction, democracy and dictatorship, and considers the historic forces that created the conditions faced by Iran since the revolution. Iran Divided: The Historic Roots of Iranian Debates on Identity, Culture, and Governance in the 21st Century explains historical and political factors and their relevance to Iran today, shedding light on the forces behind Iranian politics and society. This book discusses: historical roots of Iran’s current divisions and debates; Iran versus Islam; secularism versus religion; constitutionalism versus Islamic government; fundamental issues of identity, culture, and governance; aging of the revolutionary coalition; development of new elites; experiences of the Islamic republic; and new international conditions moving the country beyond old divides and ideological rifts toward a new national consensus. A comprehensive survey, the book will be an indispensable tool to any student seeking to understand the Islamic Republic of Iran and its standing in the world today.

Essentials of Cultural Anthropology

Author: Garrick Bailey
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781285415550
Release Date: 2013-01-11
Genre: Social Science

Brief and affordable, Bailey and Peoples' ESSENTIALS OF CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, 3rd Edition, offers you a sound introduction to cultural anthropology. In its concise coverage of the course's core topics, you'll find strong scholarship, rich ethnographic examples, and a unique focus on modern ethnicity and the survival of indigenous peoples. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Cengage Advantage Books Culture Counts A Concise Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Author: Serena Nanda
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781285738512
Release Date: 2014-01-01
Genre: Social Science

Framed around the concept of culture, CULTURE COUNTS, 3rd Edition shows you how culture matters in driving and explaining human behavior, how culture is dynamic, and how it interrelates various cultural systems in adaptive (or maladaptive) ways. The book emphasizes why understanding culture is important for understanding the world today, and how humans can solve problems and effect positive change. The authors draw you into the book’s concepts via engaging ethnographic storytelling and a conversational writing style that connects you to the topics. You’ll focus on contemporary issues, issues of globalization, issues of gender, and issues of equalities and inequalities topics that are important to both the study of anthropology and your understanding of the world around you. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Women in the Age of Shakespeare

Author: Theresa D. Kemp
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313343049
Release Date: 2010
Genre: History

This book offers a look at the lives of Elizabethan era women in the context of the great female characters in the works of William Shakespeare. * Includes over 30 excerpts from letters and diaries, plays, poems, educational and religious treatises, and legal documents from the 16th and 17th centuries * Presents photos of actors playing female Shakespearean characters, including Emma Thompson, Claire Danes, Sarah Bernhardt, and Peggy Ashcroft

The Broken Village

Author: Daniel Ross Reichman
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801463082
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

In The Broken Village, Daniel R. Reichman tells the story of a remote village in Honduras that transformed almost overnight from a sleepy coffee-growing community to a hotbed of undocumented migration to and from the United States. The small village—called here by the pseudonym La Quebrada—was once home to a thriving coffee economy. Recently, it has become dependent on migrants working in distant places like Long Island and South Dakota, who live in ways that most Honduran townspeople struggle to comprehend or explain. Reichman explores how the new "migration economy" has upended cultural ideas of success and failure, family dynamics, and local politics. During his time in La Quebrada, Reichman focused on three different strategies for social reform—a fledgling coffee cooperative that sought to raise farmer incomes and establish principles of fairness and justice through consumer activism; religious campaigns for personal morality that were intended to counter the corrosive effects of migration; and local discourses about migrant "greed" that labeled migrants as the cause of social crisis, rather than its victims. All three phenomena had one common trait: They were settings in which people presented moral visions of social welfare in response to a perceived moment of crisis. The Broken Village integrates sacred and secular ideas of morality, legal and cultural notions of justice, to explore how different groups define social progress.